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Old 05-31-2016, 10:57 AM   #11
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Toyo 245/75R/22.5 tire pressure

After driving on my new Toyo tires on my Georgetown 378TS I looked closer to the weight of the rig and its relationship to the tire pressure.
To Toyo's have a stiffer side wall than the Michelins so I think my Toyo tire pressure needs some tweaking.

I originally started out with 100 psi which seems to be a bit high for my rig.
Didn't like the ride. Hard and steering hard to manage.

Then I dropped them to 90 psi and still didn't like the steering or ride.

Front single tire weight is about 3,630 lbs on each tire.
The rear dually's are 6,804 lbs for set of dually's which is 3,400 lbs per tire.

I will be dropping all the tires down to 80 psi as per the chart below.

I will let you know my results on my next trip in a few weeks.
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Old 05-31-2016, 02:13 PM   #12
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I may try 85 psi first for a few days and see how that feels.
If it still hard riding I will take it down to 80 psi.

I'm presently at 1,000 ft above sea level and plan to drive up to Yellowstone that is higher and cold air pressure should decrease up there.

Thoughts?
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Old 05-31-2016, 05:01 PM   #13
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Iggy mine called for 80 also but found 85 to fit my Bill. What made mine ride like a dream is the Sumo's I installed. Handling and ride are so much different now that it is now a dream to drive.
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Old 05-31-2016, 05:05 PM   #14
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You have a smaller Georgetown than I do and probably has a less GVW.
85 will do you well that's ok but I have a few more pounds of extra in my 378XL

So the Sumo shocks or springs? I may just do some research on them.
Do you know the models you got and cost?
Did you install them yourself?

Thanks
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Old 05-31-2016, 08:40 PM   #15
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I talked the the company and gave them all my info and they said to use the maxims so that is what I bought through etrailer @$589 front and $589 rear. I did the install myself, fronts are easy rears a little more difficult. To make it a little easier I removed the rear duels. I am @ 24000 gvw and I would guess you are at 26000. There is a thread going on IRV2 in the Ford file. You just won't believe how they dampen the complete ride of the F53
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Old 06-03-2016, 05:54 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iggy View Post
I may try 85 psi first for a few days and see how that feels.
If it still hard riding I will take it down to 80 psi.

I'm presently at 1,000 ft above sea level and plan to drive up to Yellowstone that is higher and cold air pressure should decrease up there.

Thoughts?
You need to be sure your cold inflation pressure is always sufficient to support the measured load on the heavier end of each axle. If not, you can be doing permanent damage to the tires.
Do not adjust inflation on the "look" of a tire or "thumping" it or the "feel" of a sidewall.

Cold inflation means not being driven on or in direct sunlight for at least two hours. Be sure your digital tire gauge is accurate to better than +/- 3psi from a master gauge such as one used by your tire dealer. You do not need to worry about adjusting for elevation or changes in ambient temperature as long as you meet the minimum inflation level at the start of each travel day.

A TPMS is the best way to monitor tire inflation. Just checking each day does not work any better than checking the oil or water in your engine. That's one reason you have gauges on your instrument panel is because things happen as you drive down the road.

You might also want to read THIS post on tire failure.
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