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Old 06-14-2011, 12:14 PM   #11
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Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Hillsboro
Posts: 109
One more idea for coming down steep slopes would be to make sure your brakes have been properly maintained, are adjusted per the manufacturers suggestions, and fine tuned by the operator before making long descents. If most of the braking force is required by either the vehicle or the trailer rather than both systems working together, the brakes doing the work could overheat and become less effective, even damaging the systems. Most modern brakes work very well but no braking system can take into effect my wife's desire to bring everything we own with us. So don't get crazy with overloading and make sure the brakes are adjusted properly with both braking systems working in conjunction with each other.

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Old 06-14-2011, 03:31 PM   #12
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 87
I was just posting this more for others as I believe a lot of people have this question but might not ask. Tis a good way to get the discussion going ;-)

And agreed, I don't let the impatient ones behind me dictate how fast or slow I drive

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Old 06-14-2011, 07:16 PM   #13
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Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Southern Alberta
Posts: 458
Georgetown has been fine in the mountains

We have a 2011 Georgetown (the bunk model). Honestly I've been surprised at how well it does on hills. I can not recall not being able to maintain the speed limit. The little map below shows the places we've been last summer so lots of mountain driving. One thing that did take getting used to for me is the SOUND the engine makes. Sweet husband says "it's a Ford Truck get used to it". Yes it is louder than my minivan when working up a hill. A number of folks have suggested not being afraid to put your foot in it and I guess that is an accurate description.

The other big surprise is how well it does in wind. Yes you can feel really gusty conditions, but on a trip coming up into Idaho we were really feeling the wind - even heard knocking from the antenna. I was going a good deal slower than the speed limit. Stopped to figure out what was making that noise and were practically blown over standing up. The radio revealed 70 - 90 MPH gusts.

All in all I have been pleased. Certainly not the gutless shoebox I was fearing.

Getting the thing stuck is another fear - we turn it around in our meadow. Right now the meadow is under a few inches of water and soggy enough to suck your gum boots off as you walk. Nope I wouldn't risk a turn in that swamp now. But it has done well in fairly soft ground.

The biggest problem has been it's bigness. Parking in Monterey for example is tough first to find a long enough spot and then one without branches. When you parallel park you have to watch the tail swing. A spotter is good for that.
***** ***** *****
2011 Georgetown 320DS new June 2010
days camped in 2010: 61
days camped in 2011: 37 (up to Aug 1st)
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Old 06-14-2011, 10:23 PM   #14
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Wind in Idaho??? That's unheard of isn't it? LOL
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Old 06-14-2011, 11:10 PM   #15
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Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 1,283
One thing about going downhill, don't depend on your brakes to stop in case of an emergency if you've been riding them all the way down. Slow down and use the same gear you used going uphill, then the engine will do a lot of the braking.
Someone mentioned that the wind resistance will provide most of the braking force. That would apply only to the most gentle slopes. Many mountain roads can be in the 6 to 8% grades, and those require a heck of a lot more than the breeze whistling through your hair to slow a 20,000lb+ rig.
The main thing is to relax, take your time, and don't kill anyone.

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