Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-09-2013, 10:08 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
CoachPJG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 22
So I am a newbie, heading out on my first long trip today (Saturday). Thursday night I went out and started the fridge up. Friday morning everything looked good. We loaded it up and I even ran the generator for a hour to recharge the batteries. Saturday morning I came out and everything was dead. The batteries must have given out Friday night, because the fridge was now warm. Shouldn't the batteries last longer than that? Any ideas what I did wrong? How long does the generator take to recharge the coach batteries?
__________________

__________________
CoachPJG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2013, 10:03 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 956
Yes the batteries should last much longer. Were they fully charged after the generator run? Using the generator to charge the batteries is a very costly and inefficient method. Can't you run a simple extension cord to plug in? Don't need much current to run frig and charge batteries.
__________________

__________________
ATVer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2013, 10:57 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
VinceU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 3,502
Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachPJG View Post
So I am a newbie, heading out on my first long trip today (Saturday). Thursday night I went out and started the fridge up. Friday morning everything looked good. We loaded it up and I even ran the generator for a hour to recharge the batteries. Saturday morning I came out and everything was dead. The batteries must have given out Friday night, because the fridge was now warm. Shouldn't the batteries last longer than that? Any ideas what I did wrong? How long does the generator take to recharge the coach batteries?
You haven't said how old the Coach/batteries are. If its 3-4 years old then the battery has probably reached its useful life. If its relatively new when the last time it was charged? The generator powers the converter for DC bus and small battery charger. A couple of hours would not bring a weak battery back to life. Charging all day and night would make it useful. The fridge on propane and battery takes very little power, lights and other loads take much more. The battery will last a couple of days with reasonable care, with heater running its down to overnight for most folks.
__________________
VinceU is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2013, 07:08 PM   #4
Junior Member
 
CoachPJG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 22
My coach is brand new, it just rolled out of the factory in January. I checked my batteries before I turned on the fridge and it was reading 2/3 charge. I thought that would be enough for two days, but I still ran the genorator for a cushion. I guess it was not enough. I was a little worried about plugging in to a house outlet. I guess if I don't run the A/C or heater I should be ok to plug into my garage?
__________________
CoachPJG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2013, 08:38 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
VinceU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 3,502
Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachPJG View Post
My coach is brand new, it just rolled out of the factory in January. I checked my batteries before I turned on the fridge and it was reading 2/3 charge. I thought that would be enough for two days, but I still ran the genorator for a cushion. I guess it was not enough. I was a little worried about plugging in to a house outlet. I guess if I don't run the A/C or heater I should be ok to plug into my garage?
By all means yes, use your garage A/C . Just make sure the water heater is off or breaker open on electric. That pulls probably 12-14 amps by itself. As you mentioned with minimual loads, converter, some lights and alarms you'll probably draw no more than 6-8 amps. Of course that will include the fridge for a few more amps, plenty of room on a 15 amp circuit. I've done it for years in various coaches. The converter running this way will charge the batteries in 1-2 days or less depending on their condition. As Herk says the 2/3 charge really means in on the downside and fast. Better to go by voltage or hydrometer of acid level. The "gauge" really should be used to confirm "charging", not condition. Have fun this year, we got a good start, just finished 3 months in FL, great weather. Next year you should consider a trickle charge or periodic charging of your battery. Left in cold for months can only shorten its life dramatically.
__________________
VinceU is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2013, 09:26 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 956
You could leave the unit plugged in especially in cold weather to keep the battery charged. The converter is supposed to be a three stage unit and you could leave it plugged in all the time. I prefer to use a Deltran battery tender Jrs, actually two, one on the coach battery and one on the chassis battery for the winter. I have my unit stored in a garage but if you are in a really cold climate and outside it might be good to move the batteries to the basement or more temperate location.
__________________

__________________
ATVer is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:40 PM.