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Old 01-26-2019, 09:02 AM   #1
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Question How to Protect During the Winter

Newbie to owning an RVs and have only distant memories of traveling with my parents in their trailers and RV, so we are reading a lot to keep from making too many mistakes. Our 2018 SunSeeker 2400W is stored at the dealer in winterize mode and we have only spent one night in it there. Want to get it home after we dig out a spot in our mountain and start using it this winter. Question is - Do we have to winterize it every time we come back from a weekend trip or just hook up electric and turn on the Arctic Package. If it is going to sit for several months, I can see winterizing, but if we are going to use it once a month, I think - Electric? Also, I assume the Arctic heaters run off batteries, so shore power will keep them charged, but is solar a better alternative? I'm sure we will have more questions, but this is it for now.
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Old 01-26-2019, 09:52 AM   #2
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You will not want to rely on anything electric or gas to keep the pipes from freezing when you are not there.

I would drain the pipes and at minimum blow them out with an air compressor when not in use in the winter.

And keep a good supply of the pink stuff (RV antifreeze) on hand.

Where are you at?

That could also make a difference on our answers...
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Old 01-26-2019, 03:50 PM   #3
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just like someone who 'lives' or travels in their RV all the time, if you have interior heating in place, then you'd rarely have to worry about it since the 'pipes' are going to be not only receiving some of that heat, but are probably going to be 'encompassed' in the heated area of the RV, in the basement.

One thing we do, in western NC, is to simply drain the lines and the water tank. I don't do anything else. If you've drained the tanks, even if a little water might be sitting in some p-trap or line somewhere, chances are it is never going to get 'cold' enough, for long enough, for any issue - and our coach is not plugged in, or has any heat. The water lines are in the coach and the basement, not outside.
If you're in Canada or northern Minnesota, maybe a different approach is warranted, but where temps only fall below freezing 'every now and then', I think the worry is not warranted.
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Old 01-26-2019, 03:53 PM   #4
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also, if you have access to power for the coach while it sits, then certainly adding a few 'thermostat' controlled small heaters would be an easy solution...I would not have my furnace set to come on, though. The tank heaters are only for the tanks, not the water lines that you are concerned about, so using that would simply be a 'waste' of energy.

Drain the lines, turn on the heaters to come on when it gets 'really' low outside. One in the wet bay wouldn't be a bad idea, either.
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Old 01-26-2019, 05:57 PM   #5
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Thanks. That is just the info I needed. We are in Gatlinburg, TN so it doesn't get frozen too often, but mighty frosty occasionally. I have a small heater and will drain the water in between trips. someone mentioned blowing out the water lines. I assume low air pressure. would you do it at the water inlet? Or is that really necessary?
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Old 01-26-2019, 06:38 PM   #6
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Also, don't use those tank heaters unless there is water in the tanks. I've heard a few people mention they burnt their tanks a bit with those things.
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Old 01-26-2019, 07:21 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blacksmith View Post
Thanks. That is just the info I needed. We are in Gatlinburg, TN so it doesn't get frozen too often, but mighty frosty occasionally. I have a small heater and will drain the water in between trips. someone mentioned blowing out the water lines. I assume low air pressure. would you do it at the water inlet? Or is that really necessary?
Not really necessary...but good insurance just in case!

30PSI is the most air pressure you'll need.

You can buy this fitting in the RV section at at Walmart or Camping World for under $5.00 (I think it is $2.99) that screws into the city water-in connection and should limit the pressure to what you'll need.

You can also use it on your tank flush system if you have it as well, and don't forget to do the outside shower and just flush the toilet with the water turned off and hold the pedal down for a few seconds to allow the water to drain down from the toilet water-in line:
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Old 01-27-2019, 03:37 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by JohnD10 View Post
Not really necessary...but good insurance just in case!

30PSI is the most air pressure you'll need.

You can buy this fitting in the RV section at at Walmart or Camping World for under $5.00 (I think it is $2.99) that screws into the city water-in connection and should limit the pressure to what you'll need.

You can also use it on your tank flush system if you have it as well, and don't forget to do the outside shower and just flush the toilet with the water turned off and hold the pedal down for a few seconds to allow the water to drain down from the toilet water-in line:
I work for 14 days at a time and often can't get back home to take care of our RV during that time so in the winter I winterize it every time we use it.

I use that same fitting and a lever locking air chuck to connect it to my small compressor. I set the output pressure at 40 PSI and go inside turning each and every faucet on and off several times in a pattern to insure I have all the water out.

Yes, the toilet and outside shower need to be purged as well and they aer included in the rotation schedule I establish each time.

It is fast, easy and a one man job with that locking air chuck.

Draining the two low point drains and a cup of RV anti Freeze in the three P traps (sink, Lav and shower) and Im all set in about 25-30 minutes
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Old 01-27-2019, 05:49 PM   #9
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I do winter camping and choose to just not dewinterize the water lines once the pink stuff is in there. I drink bottled water and use the bath houses. I have a 5gal bucket with a seat for the wife at night.

It gets really cold here in winter. In the fall I will blow the lines out between trips just in case using this and my compressor at 50 PSI.
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Old 01-27-2019, 06:57 PM   #10
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I live in the Houston burbs. We get a hard freeze once in a while. Most RV owners just drain the water and put antifreeze in the traps. Never have heard of people having problems, at least in newer rigs with PEX.
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