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Old 08-25-2018, 09:53 PM   #1
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Comparison shopping

Not sure if this is the right forum for this so Mods, change it if needed. We are looking for our first travel trailer. We've looked at many different trailers and have found a few floor plans that we really like. What I'm wanting to do, since we wont be buying for a while yet, is to be able to compare different floorplans and rigs from different manufacturers without having to keep hopping from website to website. I know its probably too much to hope for but is there a website out there that allows you to compare multiple manufacturers in a side by side comparison? Thanks!
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Old 08-25-2018, 11:06 PM   #2
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I suggest just taking screenprints of the floor plans you like so that you can easily compare them.
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Old 08-25-2018, 11:18 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by MisterShockley View Post
What I'm wanting to do, since we wont be buying for a while yet, is to be able to compare different floorplans and rigs from different manufacturers without having to keep hopping from website to website. I know its probably too much to hope for but is there a website out there that allows you to compare multiple manufacturers in a side by side comparison? Thanks!
to answer your question, Nope.
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Old 08-26-2018, 06:49 AM   #4
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A side by side comparison website would make life so much easier when shopping for a rig. There are so many manufacturers with so many different brands that who knows all of them out there, especially if you are new to the game. About the best you could do it just open each floor plan in a new window and have them on screen side by side. Otherwise print out the floor plans and specs to compare old school. LOL. Good luck with your search.
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Old 08-26-2018, 07:13 AM   #5
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I agree, that would be great - maybe someone on this forum could build it so there is "an app for that". We started RVing before the internet (gasp) so we did it the old fashioned way. We walked RV lots and RV shows, and we rented different types of RVs for our trips for a couple of years to get an idea of what we wanted when it came time to buy one. Camping in a large campground is also an excellent way to see trailers and most people would be happy to talk to you about their rig and whether they are happy with it. Hint: don't ask to see inside, if they want you to see it, they will invite you in. Most will .

You could also do google searches on a particular feature you like/want/need such as "Travel trailers with a U-dinette". Good luck in your search!
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Old 08-26-2018, 11:09 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by HappyCamper1962 View Post
I agree, that would be great - maybe someone on this forum could build it so there is "an app for that".
What would be the incentive for someone to do that?

Quote:
We started RVing before the internet (gasp) so we did it the old fashioned way. We walked RV lots and RV shows, and we rented different types of RVs for our trips for a couple of years to get an idea of what we wanted when it came time to buy one. Camping in a large campground is also an excellent way to see trailers and most people would be happy to talk to you about their rig and whether they are happy with it. Hint: don't ask to see inside, if they want you to see it, they will invite you in. Most will .

You could also do google searches on a particular feature you like/want/need such as "Travel trailers with a U-dinette". Good luck in your search!
I think the oft cited phrase: "Joy is in the journey, not the destination" applies here. Half the fun in buying an RV is in the research, talking with people, comparing different brands, going to RV shows, etc. In fact, even though we are completely satisfied with our present trailer, we continue to look and compare what's out there to reaffirm that we made the right decision. But you never know, we might fall in love with something else and jump on it. Making it easy takes away half of the fun!
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Old 08-26-2018, 12:26 PM   #7
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If you're stuck with your current TV, then spend a little time finding out how much payload the TV can handle, and go from there. If you're limited on payload, then look for trailers that don't have a lot of tongue weight.
Find a trailer that when maxed out(not the dry weight on the sticker, but loaded), won't be more then the TV can handle. Be very carefull about listenning to them say "Oh yeah!! You can pull it".
IIRC, Mrs. Shockly was thinking about climbing some hills in Colorado to visit family. Don't go so big, the TV can't drag it uphill. This will all be about compromise. There are some nice A-frames out there in the pop-up world, so don't ignore all the possibilities. Stick to a hard sided camper, if you think ylou'll be in bear country

As JayArras mentioned, this part of the experience is all about the search. It's about the journey.
Leave your money at home, and start hitting some RV sales places, and shows that happen in your area. They will all work to get you to sign on the line before you leave. Keep in mind, you're just sight seeing. Familiarize yourself with whats out there. Look at fit and finish, as well as floor plans.

Get an idea of what you want and make a list. Think about pre owned as well as new. Some people move up almost immediately. Although the trailer would be used, it may be like new. There are some great deals out there, if you're patient.

The size of TT you'll be able to pull, will narrow down what's out there. Go online to the various TT manufacturers, and see what they offer. Come back here, and do a search and see whats been said. Remember, Google is your friend.
This can be very fun and very time consuming project, but here is where you avoid buyers remorse. Look at it as a time to spend together, and enjoy a good meal at the many places you'll stumble on in your search. This is a great time to really see different ideas, and embrace the creativity of TT manufacturers.
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Old 08-26-2018, 02:00 PM   #8
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Making it easy takes away half of the fun!
I dont think it would take away half the fun myself. We have been doing online research and as we find out about new rigs, we check them out. Our problem is that where we live, there are very limited options near by to purchase and even more limited to rent. We will continue to look online, I was just hoping against hope that there was an easy way to eliminate some. We do have some VERY specific wants and needs and will continue to look for those in a potential purchase. Thank you very much for your input.
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Old 08-26-2018, 02:11 PM   #9
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If you're stuck with your current TV, then spend a little time finding out how much payload the TV can handle, and go from there. If you're limited on payload, then look for trailers that don't have a lot of tongue weight.
Find a trailer that when maxed out(not the dry weight on the sticker, but loaded), won't be more then the TV can handle. Be very carefull about listenning to them say "Oh yeah!! You can pull it".
IIRC, Mrs. Shockly was thinking about climbing some hills in Colorado to visit family. Don't go so big, the TV can't drag it uphill. This will all be about compromise. There are some nice A-frames out there in the pop-up world, so don't ignore all the possibilities. Stick to a hard sided camper, if you think ylou'll be in bear country

As JayArras mentioned, this part of the experience is all about the search. It's about the journey.
Leave your money at home, and start hitting some RV sales places, and shows that happen in your area. They will all work to get you to sign on the line before you leave. Keep in mind, you're just sight seeing. Familiarize yourself with whats out there. Look at fit and finish, as well as floor plans.

Get an idea of what you want and make a list. Think about pre owned as well as new. Some people move up almost immediately. Although the trailer would be used, it may be like new. There are some great deals out there, if you're patient.

The size of TT you'll be able to pull, will narrow down what's out there. Go online to the various TT manufacturers, and see what they offer. Come back here, and do a search and see whats been said. Remember, Google is your friend.
This can be very fun and very time consuming project, but here is where you avoid buyers remorse. Look at it as a time to spend together, and enjoy a good meal at the many places you'll stumble on in your search. This is a great time to really see different ideas, and embrace the creativity of TT manufacturers.
We're not "stuck" with our current TV. We like it and would like to keep it but will upgrade if needed. Our main concern is getting what we want int the TT, then matching the TV to it if needed. We dont have any kind of camper right now and probably wont buy for several years. We retire in six years max and thats what this is about.

She doesnt want a pop up. She just told me its the canvas sides she doesnt like. She likes the A frames but they just dont meet our criteria for bathroom size and bed layout. Yeah, we already figured out about the seller saying we can pull it. Our problem is the one we really like is right at the upper end of our tow capacity (if we've figured it correctly we can tow a max of 6K lbs and the current trailer we're looking at would hit 1k of gear) that with and since we have ZERO towing experience, we have no idea how well it will work in mountains.

We have been looking at pre-owned. As I said, our main issue is can we keep our current TV or not. Several have mentioned RV shows. Any idea how to find them? Cant say I've ever seen one in our area.

Crap, gotta get ready for work. Thanks again for all the help!
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Old 08-26-2018, 03:08 PM   #10
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Excellent. Time is on your side.
Look at those campers you can pull now. If you donít find anything, decide how much TV you need, based on what you want, and what fits your budget.

Which brings you back to options for seeing floor plans. Google the manufacturer(s)and look at what they have.
Look for any RVing periodicals at local bookstores, and youíll probably find ads for upcoming RV shows. When youíre snooping at local RV sellers, look for fliers advertising shows. You could post here on the Forum regarding shows in your particular area. Be specific in the thread title, and youíll get more responses.
There really is no substitute for seeing them first hand. After you both get a good feel for size and whatís there, the floor plans you see on the web make more sense. I donít think there is a simple shopping solution.
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Old 08-27-2018, 09:46 PM   #11
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Here's a link to some upcoming shows over the next few months:
https://www.rvia.org/upcoming-consumer-rv-shows

(there are others, I'm sure; I was searching on this a few days ago and found the above)

I personally love the Chicago RV show held in Rosemont, IL - but it's months away (February, IIRC)

There's a guy who does YT videos for a Haylett RV in MI - he'll spend 15-20min on a trailer going over everything, and I've definitely learned a few things from him. Watched his video on a Cherokee 264DBH today, and really liked that model.

For floor plans, and finding what you might think you'd like - I came across this page today that gives a decent overview. Not 100% perfect / accurate, but it'll get you started on what might work for you: https://www.veurinksrv.com/shop-floor-plan/

I started out thinking (some of this based on a rental a few years back):
- Queen walkaround
- Easy access to bathroom from outside trailer (no extending slides or crawling around them)
- If it had a slide, then no appliances in it
- If there was one access door, it couldn't be on the opposite end from the bedroom.
- Biggest 'gray' tank I could find (or at least bigger than 30gal - see 'rental', above)

What worked for me, using those criteria, was a rear living / rear dining plan.

While I still love the view you get with them, I'm now starting to seriously consider a 'double' bunkhouse, so that I can rip out the bunks and gain office / storage space.
I'm also giving serious consideration to a laminated TT this time around, rather than another stick-and-tin

In short, discuss together what's important to each of you (I know a big bath is important, based on your earlier posts - and I understand, after living with the one in my 20' Grey Wolf for a couple of weeks!) I'll bet each of you bring up something the other didn't consider. Cooking outside, or inside (or at all)? Storage aplenty, or are you minimalists? Want a private bedroom, or would having a Murphy layout appeal to you? That type of thing.

After you get a chance to see some models at shows, etc., you'll start to figure out who is giving you the quality / features you want at your price point.

As far as 'right time' to buy...I've heard that:

- fall is the best season (might be wrong),
- that you'll 'always get the best pricing' at a show (some truth to this, from what I've seen),
- if you're OK with a year-end closeout, Jun-Sep are good months to shop (also for a 'new' / revised model, but don't expect a similar price break as on a MY closeout, of course).

I think letting the mfg 'build out a few' of a new model, before putting down the coin to buy one, is a smart thing. Really trying to adhere to this myself, right now, with an Alpha Wolf I've been looking at.

Finally, there's no law that says your first trailer has to be brand new. Advantages / disadvantages to buying 'new' as well as 'used'.
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Old 09-05-2018, 07:26 AM   #12
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Reprise, nice post you laid out, maybe you can answer my question. I see you may be considering a Alpha Wolf-how come? The reason i ask is Im thinking of upgrading from a 2017 FR wolf pup which is a nice tt, so my shopping is a little frustrating because its worse than car shopping and house shopping. With that said FR has a ton of models that i am looking at, Coleman has a bunch, so on so on. Which product line is considered low budget to medium budget

good find on the 2 web sites, explaining the different floor plans helped me out
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Old 09-05-2018, 08:01 AM   #13
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Make sure you can live with the floorplan with the slides CLOSED.

I have seen a few that block access to the bathroom with the slides closed. THAT is a show stopper IMO. A little planning ahead can work around a blocked refrigerator, but I need quick access to the bathroom.

The new ladder steps are GREAT in camp, but could be a real hassle in a side of the road (crowded rest area) bathroom break. They stick out a LOT farther than the folding steps on our previous rig.

Ditto on having to open a slide to use the facilities. Our dinette slide has to open a minimum of 36 inches to access the kitchen and even that is a tight squeeze. Forgetting your reservations (or dog's rabies paperwork) in the living room while traveling can be embarrassing.
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Old 09-05-2018, 08:06 AM   #14
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We purchased our best choice fiver last Thanksgiving.

Picking one out is not easy. Too many choices.

This is what I did for a living. I was an engineer. Comparing and choosing is what we do.

Study, study, study. What is important. Cheap, quality, durable is part of this.

It took the DW and I a year to decide.

Our biggest mistake was not fully understanding the tow vehicle thing. Our bad choice limited our fiver.

If you are towing read everything about people asking can I tow it?

Hitches are also a big issue. Very complex.
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Old 09-05-2018, 09:03 AM   #15
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What they say about access without opening a slide, is excellent.
Our WFKSS has two doors situated where we can use the entire kitchen bathroom and even bed, without opening anything other then one of the doors.
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Old 09-05-2018, 09:43 AM   #16
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I agree with previous posters. If you see a rig you think you will like, have them close it up to see if you can access the bed, ‘fridge, and bathroom. Maybe even the dinette, so you can grab a lunch or get out (!!!!!) an actual map or something. Or, bring a tape measure or a piece if string to get an idea how far the slides will come in when closed.

Those 4 things were important to us while traveling. Your needs may differ. Many of the newer rigs have an island in/near the kitchen. Most of those islands block the ‘fridge or access to the table while closed up. I had wanted the hard folding stairs as seen on a lot of the newer rigs, until I saw a rig with them out at a rest area. They went out into the next spot, and may be hard to deploy in a tight spot. However, I really like the feel they have when using them. So, I currently use a small scissors jack under the bottom stair.
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Old 09-05-2018, 09:51 AM   #17
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We also spent a year researching and looking and comparing before buying.

Here's the advice I'll add to this:

Do not buy solely because of floor plan. They are all too similar, in a size grouping. That's what most folks talk about, it's what motivates them, it's what they research (since it's all you can see online). Mistake! Quality trumps floor plan. Find what is built the best. Are you physically able to level it manually? Do you know the pros and cons of having an LP reefer that works by an adjustable thermister? Can you both fit in an "RV size 'Queen'" bed? Does it have the storage you need? How thick is the frame, and how is it built compared to others? What size and kind of tire/wheel is on it? What hitch is best for that trailer? How accessible is the water, batteries, converter, LP? Will it fit where you are going to store it? Have you truly figured ALL the towing considerations, ignoring much of the anecdotal comments? Can you afford it?

Those are more important than floor plan, IMHO.
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Old 09-05-2018, 09:54 AM   #18
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Just another thought. When we were looking, my T.V. Was needing replacement soon anyway (200k+ mi) So, a tow behind or 5th wheel was an option as our replacement to the pop up camper. The 5er pulls oh so sweet compared to anything bumper pull I have towed. No weight or sway bars to fiddle with. Drop n go, easy to rehook. Plus, your overall length is shorter. But, you have to commit to a truck. As we were then about 5 years out from retirement, we had time. We kept good notes on ones we hated, and started compiling a top 5 list. Changing it to a top 10 as time went on.

As BandJCarm says, look at the build quality. A biggie for me, this rig already had the heavy duty upgrades to the suspension-bigger rims and tires, heavier axles, etc. Watch for that, as too many out there have barely enough suspension to use the trailer empty, let alone with all the stuff we put in, like water and groceries....lol.

We looked at new vs used, so we had an idea of values of a used rig. Take good notes and keep them handy or in mind as you go out looking. We came across our rig at a grand opening as a special-had to meet 8 pre-qualifying items to get it. Stupid stuff like...same job for 15 years, credit scores above 820 from all 3, you get the idea. Bought it 3 years earlier than planned, but got it at a really killer price, as it was our 3rd choice, but could not pass the deal. (Sales Mgr was not happy, as he said I have been doing this for 40 years, and nobody had ever qualified for his “deal”) It was several grand less than anything used we were considering. My only dislike to the rig, I have to move the recliners when we pull in the slides.

So, we then had to go truck shopping. Now retired, still pleased with our choice, but....yea, we are always looking and comparing.
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Old 09-05-2018, 10:20 AM   #19
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Reprise, nice post you laid out, maybe you can answer my question. I see you may be considering a Alpha Wolf-how come? The reason i ask is Im thinking of upgrading from a 2017 FR wolf pup which is a nice tt, so my shopping is a little frustrating because its worse than car shopping and house shopping. With that said FR has a ton of models that i am looking at, Coleman has a bunch, so on so on. Which product line is considered low budget to medium budget

good find on the 2 web sites, explaining the different floor plans helped me out
Thanks for the kind words; glad the info was helpful.

I'm considering an Alpha because:
- The insulation factor, in a TT (see my recent post history for some info on R-factors and the like). I don't want to do 'winter camping', but 'late / early season' certainly is appealing, in that I don't need to worry about moving the trailer the second the temps are in danger of dropping below freezing.
- It's a couple of steps up from what I have now (using the Cherokee lines as an example - Pup / Wolf / Cherokee / Alpha & Arctic are pretty much 'bottom' to 'top' of that brand (to me, Alpha & Arctic are equivalent, just that one is a TT line and the other is comprised of 5ers.) The Alphas are laminated (that's why you see the '-L' in all their descriptions).
- They have a floorplan (23RD-L) that looks to work 'for me'.

One reason I'm shying *away* from another 'Cherokee' product is FR's support - I'm in the middle of some contentious debate with one of their support people on my Grey Wolf, right now - and I already know I'd be dealing with this same person on an 'Alpha' purchase (unfortunately, the floorplan I want is brand-new, so there are no 'used' in the channel.) Pretty sad that that, in itself, is likely to sway my decision on whether or not to purchase.

As far as the other manufacturers...you mentioned Coleman, specifically. When I reviewed Coleman's floorplans, none worked for me (based on my original criteria). About all I can say here is... 'do your homework'. It takes time, because there is no all-encompassing worksheet / grid available. Review online, see in person (shows are great, as I mentioned earlier - you can crawl around to your heart's content w/o a sales person hovering...most of the time...LOL)

For the person shopping for their first TT (or popup, or 5er, etc.), it can be daunting. Many here recommend something 'used' as a first purchase; the one drawback with that (there are several 'pluses') is that it can be hard for the first-time buyer to know how much 'life' is left in that used purchase.

I had another recent post here asking about "what are the good brands?" There are some good suggestions there, and I mention some (non-FR) brands I'd been looking at, as well.

If you're staying within FR, it seems that the Rockwood and Flagstaff seem to be regarded as the 'cream' of the TT offerings. I was in a friend's Rockwood recently - the finishes were definitely a step up, but I didn't think it was a 'night and day' difference overall (some components / subsystems are common between most of the brands). 'Better', yes...but not prompting me to drop everything and go get one (no offence intended to our Rockwood / Flagstaff owners here!)
Cherokee, from what I can tell, is more toward the 'entry' / 'value' level, in FR's brand palette of TTs (so everything else, hard-sided, slots roughly in-between them and Rockwood / Flagstaff.)
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Old 09-05-2018, 10:48 AM   #20
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First, I think you'll need to decide what it is you 'like' about a particular floor plan more so than just the floor plan itself. As others have stated, sometimes a small variation in the floor plan might be acceptable. I wouldn't worry too much about brands, or colour/pattern choices yet. Get down the basics of what 'features' you want in a rig.

Next, since I'm a big advocate of buying local, is to shop your local dealers. Not for a particular rig, but for a particular dealer. These are the people you're going to likely have a lasting relationship with over the years. Make sure you're comfortable with them, check their service department, check out reviews of them, etc... While there are alternatives to having a good relationship with a dealer, (like using a Mobile RV Tech for instance) often things tend to be inherently easier if you have somebody you can trust and has a good history of your rig. If you find a dealer you like and trust, then take a look at what brands they carry and see if there's a model that meets your 'features' you want.
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