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Old 01-01-2011, 10:48 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by yvesm
Here is what we should do: The world should tell the oil companies that we will pay them $20.00 per barrel for the oil! if they say no who else would buy it?
China. Their appetite for oil exceeds ours. Just paid $3.40 for diesel. No reason diesel is more than gas other than because they can get it.
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Old 01-02-2011, 11:23 AM   #22
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I feel for those that have diesel vehicles, i myself have a gas engine. In the past diesel has all ways been cheaper then gas and the only time that there was an increase in diesel was during the Winter because of home heating oil.
Now that there is more of a demand for diesel because of more of use are buying diesel vehicles, but this isn't the only cause of the price increase more people are buy on line so there are more home deliveries, your State and federal sales tax have increased now people are being charged an added fuel charge for services.....This on going.

Now correct me if i am wrong, my understanding is that diesel is the first thing that comes from crude oil and is cheaper to make, the second thing is that it cost more to refine crude into gasoline.

Less face it we are stuck and until we come up with an alternative fuel and the fuel companies can be stopped from intertfering with this development we will pay the price and my out look is that it is going to get worse.
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Old 01-02-2011, 11:30 AM   #23
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Crude prices are a direct function of the value of the US dollar. As the dollar drops the price of crude increases. Oil prices are stated in US dollars so as our currency drops in value, the price of oil goes up. In theory the dropping US dollar will make imports more expensive and increase employment in the US. That's the theory at least. My guess is that US prices will see diesel somewhere in the $4.50 range and gas in the $4 range. Just a guess on my part. We are still going to plan a major trip this summer and another one next summer. If I do a 10,000 mile trip and I get 10 miles to the gallon then a $1 increase in diesel will mean my trip will cost an extra $1,000. If I can't afford that cost then I shouldn't be travelling. I'm sure I can find somewhere else to cut to come up with those $$ if I need to.
This is also the reason for the current "bull market" Stocks, gold, silver, oil, etc. all are commodities that are priced in dollars. As the value of the US dollar (USD) on the world market falls, the stuff that the dollar buys becomes more expensive. Since the payroll (in dollars) has not increased (how the government reports inflation) our buying power is reduced. It is the "hidden tax" on the economy. 1/100 ounce of gold at 65 dollars an ounce in 1970 bought a loaf of bread. In 2010 1/100 ounce of gold at 1400 dollars an ounce still buys that loaf of bread. QED
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Old 01-02-2011, 03:17 PM   #24
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"Now correct me if i am wrong, my understanding is that diesel is the first thing that comes from crude oil and is cheaper to make, the second thing is that it cost more to refine crude into gasoline."

that was true before low sulfur and now ultra low sulfur diesel. another process is added to remove the sulfur to meet the 15 part per million spec.
diesel is the product right under Kerosene in an atmospheric topping unit (first processing unit). from there it use to go straight to product. now some of it goes to a hydrotreater before going to product.

gasoline is a blend from several product streams. primarily, diesel (Light Gas Oil) and/or HGO are cracked to get gasoline as well as other things ie propane, butane, etc. the short answer, gasoline goes thru more processes.

diesel still offers more energy/volume.
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Old 01-02-2011, 03:57 PM   #25
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"Now correct me if i am wrong.
Jim,

Here are two articles that explain the process much better than I can.
My Chemistry degree from Villanova University is a bit dated but refining has not changed much.

There are two sources of very high quality "Light Sweet Crude." The "light" part means a high percentage of low boiling point organics (thus yields a better percentage of fuel products) and "Sweet" which means VERY low percentages of Sulphur bearing compounds.

Most Light Sweet Crude being used today comes from Venezuela, England, and Libya. The North Sea source is almost gone and England has now become a net importer of oil for the first time since oil first started being pumped out of it.

The Arabian Shield crude is mostly "Light Sour" or high in Sulphur. It is very expensive to "de-sulphate" for use in diesel.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf refining.pdf (431.2 KB, 25 views)
File Type: pdf Crude Oil Fractions.pdf (37.5 KB, 21 views)
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Old 01-02-2011, 06:09 PM   #26
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Jim,

Here are two articles that explain the process much better than I can.
My Chemistry degree from Villanova University is a bit dated but refining has not changed much.

There are two sources of very high quality "Light Sweet Crude." The "light" part means a high percentage of low boiling point organics (thus yields a better percentage of fuel products) and "Sweet" which means VERY low percentages of Sulphur bearing compounds.

Most Light Sweet Crude being used today comes from Venezuela, England, and Libya. The North Sea source is almost gone and England has now become a net importer of oil for the first time since oil first started being pumped out of it.

the overview explamation is very good. even had the H-Oil that i worked 5

The Arabian Shield crude is mostly "Light Sour" or high in Sulphur. It is very expensive to "de-sulphate" for use in diesel.
the refinery overview is a good explanation. Even had the H-Oil (synthetic crude oil unit) in it on p.17. i worked 5 yrs in it.
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Old 01-06-2011, 08:40 PM   #27
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Diesel in Arizona

I just filled up and paid $3.099 for Diesel.
Reg Gas is running $2.899

That trip to Branson MO in the spring will be getting more and more expensive. Oh well.
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Old 01-06-2011, 09:55 PM   #28
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Leaving for Florida at the end of the month.
Not looking forward to that diesel bill either.
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Old 01-06-2011, 10:16 PM   #29
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Leaving for Florida at the end of the month.
Not looking forward to that diesel bill either.
I just checked on a trip planner and it seems the diesel prices will be lower as you get out of PA. and further south. But it still looks like $3.199 to $3.259 is a good ballpark price.
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Old 01-07-2011, 08:39 AM   #30
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Filled up yesterday in North Little Rock, AR for $3.12, but on the interstate not more than 10 miles from this Kroger station it was $3.39. If you have the time and a GPS that gives you fuel prices you can save some money. Of course the big question is why?
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