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Old 04-30-2015, 07:10 AM   #31
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Our 97 Chevy 350 gets better mileage using non-ethanol fuel by 2-3 MPG, but cost wise not worth it....
no difference between regular or premium ethanol.
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Old 04-30-2015, 08:03 AM   #32
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I WISH we could buy non-ethanol fuel where I live!!! Especially for winter
storage in small engines and my motorcycle. I can't find it anywhere around me. Same goes for my sons. One has a Corvette and the other a GTO. Both driven very little in winter and they would both love to be able to put no-ethanol in them at least over the winter.

What states do you live where you can get it??
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Old 04-30-2015, 08:09 AM   #33
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Gas premium vs regular

Quote:
Originally Posted by KyDan View Post
I WISH we could buy non-ethanol fuel where I live!!! Especially for winter
storage in small engines and my motorcycle. I can't find it anywhere around me. Same goes for my sons. One has a Corvette and the other a GTO. Both driven very little in winter and they would both love to be able to put no-ethanol in them at least over the winter.

What states do you live where you can get it??

You can buy it in select stations around me in Wisconsin, Dan. Although, it is becoming harder every year as more of the "Real Gas" pumps switch over.

I typically find real gas in boating (Door County Peninsula and Lake Counties in WI) and heavy snowmobiling communities.

This might help those looking ... http://pure-gas.org
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Old 04-30-2015, 08:31 AM   #34
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F150 Ecoboost owner's manual states when towing heavy loads premium fuel is "recommended". Now I am not sure exactly what constitutes a "heavy" load but in three trips from Florida to Rookies and beyond I have used all three grades of gasoline and kept hand calculated milage records. I have found that in my case the grade of gasoline made no difference in mpg and the only change was how much I spent. I never felt or heard any pinging or difference in power.

My new plan is to use regular until I get to really big climbs and I don't know why.
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Old 04-30-2015, 09:31 AM   #35
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I did the test on a company car in 1997. A v6 mini van that had no spark knock spark knock when running on premium. The difference in fuel economy would almost pay for the premium but never go to the positive creating a savings.
All 3 of my vehicles today are premium only. They will spark knock badly if I accidentally put regular or even mid grade in them. The timing is advanced from the factory requiring the different octane rating. Vehicles today are a nissan z roadster, the srt jeep and a 98 5.9 grand cherokee I've had since 98.
One time since 1998 i've pumped premium in the old jeep and it was not premium. A hole in the wall station off the interstate in southern Alabama. It took only to the top of the on ramp before the engine starting pinging or rattling badly. I stopped at the next exit and dumped in two bottles of octane boost which corrected the problem within a few minutes.
The jeep now has 220k on the odometer. Underneath the valve cover is a brand new valve train, zero carbon build up. And it's been abused nearly all it's life. It was born titled the fastest suv in the world and I have enjoyed it.
Growing up I had been into numerous engines and nearly every one in the oil pan or valve cover were gunked with carbon.
Today the 5.9 does not burn oil. Normally oil burning is caused by carbon building up on the valve stems dragging the oil into the combustion chamber through the valve stem seal. It also wears out the valve seal.
So yes, a tuner can change the timing to add horse power and benefit more from pumping premium in the tank but...there are other benefits if you plan to keep that vehicle and use it after it has high milage.
Most people don't keep cars after 100k miles. I don't either unless its a special model or just a plain fun car to drive. No plans on selling the 98 5.9. One can't even buy leather like that any more lol
As info
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Old 05-05-2015, 01:23 AM   #36
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Gas premium vs regular

I have carefully computed gas mileage with and without high octane gas. There is no difference in gas mileage pulling the mini lite with my Chevy silverado half ton.

Why did my dad always say he was going to put ethyl gas in the old Packard when he wanted a tank of high octane? Isn't ethyl gas=ethanol gas which is the bane of high octane gas lovers everywhere? Thinking back I could never figure this out. My horse feels strongly that the term "horse power" is a racist remark. 
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Old 05-05-2015, 06:19 AM   #37
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Quote:
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I have carefully computed gas mileage with and without high octane gas. There is no difference in gas mileage pulling the mini lite with my Chevy silverado half ton.

Why did my dad always say he was going to put ethyl gas in the old Packard when he wanted a tank of high octane? Isn't ethyl gas=ethanol gas which is the bane of high octane gas lovers everywhere? Thinking back I could never figure this out. My horse feels strongly that the term "horse power" is a racist remark. Attachment 76185
Ethyl gas was a premium gas can't remember which brand & was not with ethanol. Two different animals. I can't remember when they started putting ethanol in gas but long after the old Packard was gone I think it was the late 70s early 1980s. My 76 Ford pickup was one of the last to use leaded fuels & that was long before ethanol was added. Horse power was even measured differently back then.
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Old 05-05-2015, 07:23 AM   #38
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Ethyl gas was a premium gas can't remember which brand & was not with ethanol. Two different animals.
Correct, Ethyl back in the day was leaded gasoline and get's it's name from tetraethyl lead .

Here is a snippet of the history:

Tetraethyllead - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

History of TEL in fuels

Regardless of the details of the chemical discoveries, tetraethyl lead remained unimportant commercially until the 1920s. In 1921, at the direction of Dupont Corporation which manufactured TEL, it was found to be an effective antiknock agent by Thomas Midgley, working under Charles Kettering at General Motors Corporation Research.

General Motors patented the use of TEL as an antiknock agent and used the name "Ethyl" that had been proposed by Kettering in its marketing materials, thereby avoiding the negative connotation of the word "lead". Early research into "engine knocking" (also called "pinging" or "pinking") was also led by A.H. Gibson and Harry Ricardo in England and Thomas Boyd in the United States. The discovery that additives modified this behavior led to the widespread adoption of their use in the 1920s, and therefore more powerful, higher compression engines.


In 1924, Standard Oil of New Jersey(ESSO/EXXON) and General Motors created the Ethyl Gasoline Corporation to produce and market TEL. Deepwater, NJ across the river from Wilmington, was the site for production of some of DuPont's most important chemicals, particularly tetraethyl lead (TEL). After TEL production at the Bayway Refinery was shut down, Deepwater was the only plant in the Western hemisphere producing TEL up to 1948, when it accounted for the bulk of the Dupont/Deepwater's production.


PHASEOUT:



In the 1970s, Herbert Needleman found that higher lead levels in children were correlated with decreased school performance. Needleman was repeatedly accused of scientific misconduct by individuals within the lead industry, but he was eventually cleared by a scientific advisory council. Needleman also wrote the average US child's blood lead level was 13.7 μg/dl in 1976 and that Patterson believed that everyone was to some degree poisoned by TEL in gasoline.


In the U.S. in 1973, the United States Environmental Protection Agency issued regulations to reduce the lead content of leaded gasoline over a series of annual phases, which therefore came to be known as the "lead phasedown" program. EPA's rules were issued under section 211 of the Clean Air Act, as amended 1970. The Ethyl Corp challenged the EPA regulations in Federal court. Although the EPA's regulation was initially dismissed, the EPA won the case on appeal, so the TEL phasedown began to be implemented in 1976. Additional regulatory changes were made by EPA over the next decade (including adoption of a trading market in "lead credits" in 1982 that became the precursor of the Acid Rain Allowance Market, adopted in 1990 for SO2), but the decisive rule was issued in 1985.


Then EPA mandated that lead additive be reduced by 91 percent by the end of 1986. A 1994 study had indicated that the concentration of lead in the blood of the U.S. population had dropped 78% from 1976 to 1991.

In 1995, leaded fuel accounted for only 0.6% of total gasoline sales and less than 2000 short tons (1814 t) of lead per year. From 1 January 1996, the U.S. Clean Air Act banned the sale of leaded fuel for use in on-road vehicles. Thus, what had begun in the U.S. as a phasedown ultimately ended in a phase-out. Similar bans in other countries have resulted in lowering levels of lead in people's bloodstreams.
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