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Old 06-12-2015, 03:16 PM   #91
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I went to the lot to see a 2012 wrangler and ended up buying new. The price was 1000$ different so it made since to buy new.
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Old 06-12-2015, 03:24 PM   #92
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We bought new. The newer ones have no steering wheel lock. The 2 door sport soft top weighs about 3700 lbs or so. We bought a rubicon because looks nice right off showroom and weighs 4000
I think you could get a 2 door sport for not much more than 20k
Shop around, look for a leftover 2015
The 2016 are coming out


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Old 06-12-2015, 04:01 PM   #93
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Originally Posted by Sandiegodoug View Post
We bought new. The newer ones have no steering wheel lock. The 2 door sport soft top weighs about 3700 lbs or so. We bought a rubicon because looks nice right off showroom and weighs 4000
I think you could get a 2 door sport for not much more than 20k
Shop around, look for a leftover 2015
The 2016 are coming out


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Thanks Doug. Didn't know about the steering wheel lock. We usually buy new and keep for a long time. I really like the Rubicon model.


2015 Solera 24R
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Old 06-12-2015, 04:20 PM   #94
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This will be the last jeep we buy because I got the life time warrantee
Through Chrysler. We are not off road freaks but really liked the rubicon looks and I'm not a jeep builder. I would hesitate buying used because some people beat up their jeeps and I wouldn't know which parts might be wrecked. I got auto because I'm to old to mess with a stick. I'm sure you could find 4-6 percent below invoice if you shop around.


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Old 06-12-2015, 09:11 PM   #95
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As I mentioned a while back, I took a look at the new Honda HR-V...and drove one home today.

It's quite a bit bigger than a Fit, and, at 2,900 lbs, about 500 lbs heavier, but the two vehicles are quite similar. They share the same trim levels (LX, EX, EX with Navigation), the same onboard electronics, the same transmission choices (towable 6 sp manual, non-towable CVT), and very similar seating and cargo layouts. The HR-V uses a 1.8 liter (Civic?) engine, while the Fit engine is 1.4 liter. As I drove them both, the HR-V seemed to be more in the same size range with the typical smallish cars while the Fit felt quite a bit smaller. Neither has performance that's gonna knock your socks off, but both seemed to be at least a little peppy and both seemed to handle well.

Models of the HR-V seem to list for 2k-3k more than the comparable Fits. The HR-V does appear to be one of the hottest introductions in recent memory. One report indicated that Honda had seeded the dealers with about 7,000 units and that somewhat more than 6,500 were sold in the first couple of weeks. I purchased in Tucson and the dealers I spoke with all said that I ended up with one of the three remaining EX manual transmission units in a three state area. One dealer also reported that the HR-V and the Fit are built on the same assembly line, but that the line is dedicated to one or the other (ie, when they're building Fits, they're not building HR-Vs.) He also said that the high demand for HR-Vs is impacting the availability of Fits as they run the line with HR-Vs to catch up with the initial demand.

Given the high current demand for HR-Vs and the limited supply, I was surprised how aggressive the pricing was from both Tucson dealerships. Both offered top dollar for my trade (a 2007 Toyota Sienna with 120k miles) and at least a token discount off of MRSP. I ended up going with the dealer that actually had the EX / manual in stock.

As for towing, both Roadmaster and Blue Ox are planning to produce HR-V baseplates. It appears that Roadmaster is still looking for someone up in the northwest to bring one in - Blue Ox reported that they have an HR-V and expect to have the baseplate designed in the next few days. But Blue Ox also said that they don't expect production baseplates to be available to the public until early July.

I'm sure hoping it all works out!

Fit web site:
Shop for a Honda Fit - Official Honda Website

HR-V web site:
2016 Honda HR-V - Official Site

Dave
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Old 07-01-2015, 11:10 PM   #96
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Acme Car dolly.

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Originally Posted by Roger64 View Post
We bought a Honda Fit 2015 but it cannot be flat towed. Didn't want to flat tow the vehicle so we are considering the Acme Car dolly.
Acme "EZE-TOW" Tow Dolly - Car Tow Dolly
Check it out
Hi,
I have a 2013 Solera and use a Acme Car dolly. Works Great

This year I did add a Hitch Dolly, Makes it easy to move, it bolts on.

Jim
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Old 07-02-2015, 12:07 PM   #97
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Solera Dinghy Towing 101 (For Smart Folks)

Although we’ve managed to park our Solera in “normal” parking lots, our ambition was to explore new places using the RV as a base camp. Naturally, this led to exploring tow vehicles and the economics of towing a dinghy. Our options were limited to an automatic transmission. Our choice would be an older Suzuki Samurai, Sidekick or Tracker since the 4 wd automatics had a transfer case to isolate the drivetrain when towing. They are rugged, inexpensive and don’t weigh very much. Finding one already equipped for towing is rare and when you do, they command a premium price.

Then we encountered a Smart Car dinghy in an RV park. The owner was very pleased with it but wasn’t a “car guy” and couldn’t provide detailed information about towing one. I thought sharing what I learned would be helpful to other folks.

First, I managed to find a Roadmaster 5000 tow bar at an estate sale for $50; new ones retail for $599. Check your local Craigslist using “Roadmaster” as a search term and you’ll find similar deals. You’ll need one of these no matter which vehicle you decide to tow.

Next, I read all I could about Smart Cars on the web. They can be towed because they have an automatic clutch, so when the car is in Neutral, the drivetrain is isolated from the wheels. Otherwise, it’s a 5 speed, automatically shifted by a computer. Confusing? It’s the computer that engages and disengages the clutch. There is a bit of delay in the shifting, but you can make decisions for the computer using “paddles” or by moving the floor mounted shift selector. How aggressively the clutch will engage/disengage is totally up to the car’s computer. Don’t expect “lightning” speed shifts; they’ll be more like your grandpa driving a column shift Chevy. Nevertheless, the car is entertaining to drive.

Third, we looked at used Smarts. We found them at over 100,000 miles, still reliably driven every day. We thought how fun it would be to get a “vinyl wrap” to match our Solera’s body paint. The one we settled on was for sale by owner on Craigslist, ’09 model, with 19,000 miles which lived in a garage for $7k. It actually matched the design and color cues of our Solera! Also, it weighs only 1,700 pounds and so we’d be OK towing it without a supplemental braking system (which could cost up to $2k, installed!). By the way, Smarts get good safety ratings in Europe. You can find crash tests on YouTube. In one, they crashed a Smart into an S500 Benz, head on, at 30 mph. The Smarts cabin interior remained intact and the passenger door opened and closed normally. Though they look small, they’re VERY easy to enter because the seats are higher than many other cars. Inside, they feel much larger than you’d think.

Fourth, after saving money on the tow bar, I decided to have the Roadmaster tow brackets professionally installed. The total was $903 which included the brackets (retail $499), safety cables and wiring the lights to run off our Solera connector.

Fifth, the Smart Owners Manual discusses flat towing extensively. Benz requires that the battery be disconnected. Some folks never do that and tow without incident; others experienced locked brakes and other misfortunes. I chose to install a battery disconnect switch as cheap insurance. The idea that a bump in the road might jostle the computer into doing something unexpected bothers me. A cutoff switch equals peace of mind.

Our experience is totally positive so far. Our fuel mileage took a slight hit … we were running close to 15 mpg while towing Smartie we get 13.5 mpg. By itself, the Smartie is getting close to 40 mpg (drinks Premium). The Smart has not affected the driving characteristics of the Solera. Without the rear camera, we might forget its there. I’ve heard the expression “you won’t even know its there” with each of my 4 previous travel trailers. Baloney; I always did. Truthfully, its very easy to forget the Smartie is behind the Solera.

There are some caveats to owning a Smartie. NEVER lose a key; if you must replace one, your local Smart Car Center will require $500; they’ll have to E Mail Europe (France, where everyone takes a 30 day vacation during our best RV season) to get a special digital code; the code expires in 8 hours. You think that’s bad? Lose both keys and your Smartie will need a new $2,000 computer. Oil changes are easy. The engine air filter and cabin air filter require changing every 10k miles; also easy and inexpensive.

There is NO low coolant warning light. If your overheat warning light comes on, shut it down immediately or risk a huge repair bill. The engine is made of aluminum and will at very least blow a head gasket or warp the head. Heads are not rebuildable and in the worst case, the pistons will score the cylinders and you’ll need a new motor. Check the coolant … if its at the full mark and you don’t see any antifreeze on the ground, you’re probably OK. On ours, whoever checked it previously did not tighten the reservoir cap and about a quart had evaporated over time. If evaluating a used Smart and you see white smoke in the exhaust, it may be an indication of a blown head gasket allowing coolant to leak into the combustion chamber. Avoid it.

Hope I have not revealed more than I know! Please validate your decisions with your own research. Most of this information was gleaned from the Smart Owners forum which is almost as helpful as this one!
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Old 07-02-2015, 12:52 PM   #98
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The 2013 Fit can be flat towed. The 2015 Fit cannot be flat towed. The advantage of flat towing is saving considerable weight and not having to store the dolly when not in use. The Soleras are already weight challenged so I would avoid a dolly if at all possible.
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Old 07-02-2015, 01:08 PM   #99
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The 2015 Fit cannot be flat towed
That's not completely correct. The 2015 Fit with the CVT cannot be flat towed. But the 6 speed manual transmission models can be flat towed. The same is true for the 2016 HR-V - CVT: no tow; 6 speed: Happy towing.

Dave
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Old 07-02-2015, 01:11 PM   #100
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Yes, you are right. The manual transmission models can be flat towed in a 2015 Fit.
Gary
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