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Old 10-19-2013, 08:37 PM   #21
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Tires are built to handle the increased pressure when the air inside is heated, how well they handle that increase is anyone's guess.
All it takes is one unseen blemish.
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Old 10-19-2013, 09:01 PM   #22
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And the source of that objective evidence you are quoting?
Tireman9's blog. Specifically paragraph 6: http://www.rvtiresafety.com/2013/06/...ssure.html?m=1
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Old 10-19-2013, 09:02 PM   #23
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When I had 5000 miles on my solera noticed tire wear on outside edges of front tires had pressure at specs on the door. Since than inflated them to 80psi cold 10,000 miles on them now,tires look perfect now,thought it was alignment problem. Think it was the lower pressure. I think it's safer to run them at the 80 psi because the tires run cooler. You have a little extra weight carrying capacity and you get better gas mileage because the tires roll with less resistance. The only draw back is you get a little harder ride. Does not matter about how much pressure they are when there hot. Manufacture say 80 psi cold so I sure they figured for heat and temperature increase.
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Old 10-19-2013, 09:37 PM   #24
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Tireman9's blog. Specifically paragraph 6: RV Tire Safety: Had a question about High Pressure
And it also states "Over-inflation tires make for spectacular explosions". Doesn't make any difference how they got over-inflated. I don't deflate hot tires because it is a pita and requires re-inflation, but if someone wants to do it, it won't hurt a thing. To each his own. I have yet to see a tire manufacture warn against deflating hot tires. If I were on a long trip and the temp and pressure kept rising and the pressure got to a point that "I" considered excessive, I would bleed them off. Truck System Technologies(TST) states: "We recommend you set the parameters at 15% above and 10% below what you typically run in your tires. System Technologies believes to be the safe zone. As for temperature, the monitors are preset at 157' F, a safe setting for all tires, which typically fail between 180-200" F."
So, in my case with a 65# cold pressure and the recommended 15% over cold pressure for an alarm, 10# over or 75# would be setting off the alarm and I would deflate.
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Old 10-20-2013, 12:42 AM   #25
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I actually did see something about not letting air out of hot tires somewhere recently... I need to recall where, though.
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Old 10-20-2013, 01:00 AM   #26
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All rated tire temperatures are "cold". Of course the pressure goes up once you get rolling. The manufacturers are not stupid and the product is designed to handle this increase in pressure. There is no need to ever let air out of tires because they have warmed up.

Can a tire blow because of too much pressure? Sure. But the reasons are going to be overloading and/or over the speed rating for the tire.
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Old 10-20-2013, 09:21 AM   #27
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OC, the example you give is the case where a large change is ambient temperature has increased the "cold pressure" to the wrong value. I've been thru that once, and yes, I readjusted the pressure (with them hot) also.

For Taylorgso's case, let's use my RV which requires that my tires be at 80psi (cold) to carry the load. The "Max Pressure" on the sidewalls is also 80 pounds. Because Taylorgso has this totally wrong idea that the "Max Pressure" rating is a hot pressure, and based on what he said, he will put ~72# of cold pressure into my tires so that they don't exceed the "Max Pressure" when they get hot.

Because of this incorrect thinking, which you seem to want to say is ok, my tires will be severely under-inflated and blowouts are likely to follow. Then Taylorgso will be back here talking about the "junk" Maxxis tires when in fact the problem is "user error".
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Old 10-20-2013, 09:56 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by BarryD0706 View Post
But I've always heard never to let air out of a hot tire because you think it's over-pressure.
I'd believe this statement.
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Old 10-20-2013, 09:58 AM   #29
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OC, the example you give is the case where a large change is ambient temperature has increased the "cold pressure" to the wrong value. I've been thru that once, and yes, I readjusted the pressure (with them hot) also.

For Taylorgso's case, let's use my RV which requires that my tires be at 80psi (cold) to carry the load. The "Max Pressure" on the sidewalls is also 80 pounds. Because Taylorgso has this totally wrong idea that the "Max Pressure" rating is a hot pressure, and based on what he said, he will put ~72# of cold pressure into my tires so that they don't exceed the "Max Pressure" when they get hot.

Because of this incorrect thinking, which you seem to want to say is ok, my tires will be severely under-inflated and blowouts are likely to follow. Then Taylorgso will be back here talking about the "junk" Maxxis tires when in fact the problem is "user error".
You are wrong! Taylorgso states that he starts his trip with 65 cold and limits it to 80 hot. Nowhere does he state that he starts underinflated and I never stated doing it either.
I'm out of here.
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Old 10-20-2013, 02:09 PM   #30
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A tire's maximum inflation pressure is the highest "cold" inflation pressure that the tire is designed to contain. However the tire's maximum inflation pressure should only be used when called for on the vehicle's tire placard or in the vehicle's owners manual. It is also important to remember that the vehicle's recommended tire inflation pressure is always to be measured and set when the tire is "cold." Cold conditions are defined as early in the morning before the day's ambient temperature, sun's radiant heat or the heat generated while driving have caused the tire pressure to temporarily increase.
For the reasons indicated above, It is also normal to experience "hot" tire pressures that are up to 5 to 6 psi above the tire's recommended "cold" pressure during the day if the vehicle is parked in the sun or has been extensively driven. Therefore, if the vehicle's recommended "cold" inflation pressures correspond with the tire's maximum inflation pressure, it will often appear that too much tire pressure is present. However, this extra "hot" tire pressure is temporary and should NOT be bled off to return the tire pressure to within the maximum inflation pressure value branded on the tire. If the "cold" tire pressure was correctly set initially, the temporary "hot" tire pressure will have returned to the tire's maximum inflation pressure when next measured in "cold" conditions.
A tire's "maximum inflation pressure" may be different that the assigned tire pressure used to rate the tire's "maximum load." For example, while a P-metric sized standard load tire's maximum load is rated at 35 psi, many P-metric sized standard load performance and touring tires are designed to contain up to 44 psi (and are branded on their sidewalls accordingly). This additional range of inflation pressure (in this case, between 36 and 44 psi) has been provided to accommodate any unique handling, high speed and/or rolling resistance requirements determined by the tire and vehicle manufacturers. These unique tire pressures will be identified on the vehicle placard in the vehicle's owner's manual.
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