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Old 04-14-2016, 09:34 PM   #11
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I work for a city service department, we call them grindings. They come from when an asphalt road is ground out and replaced. This is the waste material left over. We use them all the time for access roads, trails ect. There is no usable tar residue left so the grindings are more like black gravel varying in size from peas to soft ball pancakes. This material can be compressed to form a tight, hard surface. We do not roll or vibrate, just drive trucks over it. A tamper would work good to lock it together.
411 limestone is best but more expensive. Grape size stone down to dust. Locks in real nice and is gray instead of black.
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Old 04-14-2016, 11:38 PM   #12
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Love my millings driveway. Paid $125 for a tandem truck. 18tons I believe
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Old 04-15-2016, 08:36 AM   #13
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On a hot sunny day out a LIGHT spray of diesel and it will help seal up if you are packing or rolling it. In the muddy areas I would put rock or gravel. The road is only good as the foundation.


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Old 04-15-2016, 08:51 AM   #14
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Recycled asphalt is just Millings.


It will no longer bond together because you would need liquid AC to have it stick together again.

In areas that are softer, you might want to look into getting a load of recycled concrete delivered first. (Crushed Concrete) Unlike millings still has SOME of the properties from the cement powder in them and will harden up nicely once moisture hits it. You will want to compact the concrete, and then the millings on top of it.




I worked for a pavement consultant (IE Inspector) on parking lot rehabilitation for 7 years. Crushed concrete was my favorite stuff to order if we had a soft spot to stiffen up. In fact, depending how thick and how far you need to go, it might be worth your while to put down crushed concrete over your whole area (about 6-8 inches) and then top it with 4-6" of millings. The millings otherwise will just pound into the mud and you'll need to top it off again in a few years. If you put a solid base down, you won't need to touch the millings with the exception of pot holes for years to come.
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Old 04-15-2016, 12:46 PM   #15
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I checked, and the recycled asphalt is readily available here. For the last 20 years or so, Waterloo has been using asphalt almost exclusively because it's cheaper, but more recently theyve been tearing up a lot of the asphalt in favor of concrete. I planned to rent a 1, or 2 ton vibrating roller to pack it as best I can.
Go to a rental place and rent a vibra-pack it will pack easy to run. It has a gas engine with a plate about 2 x 2 foot plate.
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Old 04-15-2016, 03:37 PM   #16
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Having more than 40 years in construction management prior to retirement, I can tell you there are no issues with recycled asphalt. Actually, there's no difference in recycled and new. The secret, though, is in the preparation of the sub grade below the asphalt and the base course (gravel layer under the asphalt). The soils in your area Dan wreak havoc if you gave clay, but as a general rule, here's what I would say you want to do.

1. Remove any muddy areas and refill with dry soil.

2. Rent a small tamper or roller and roll/tamp the area thoroughly.

3. Using your RV, drive through the area to be paved and have someone watch the wheels. If you have a soft spot, the soil will "pump", in other words it will push upward as the wheel sinks. Those areas, if any, need to be dug out and replaced with dry, compacted soil. This process is called proof rolling.

4. You want a crushed stone base course on top of the soil and below the asphalt. For typical RV loading, I would say about 4" of 3/4" stone would do but 6" would be better. The quarry will most likely have what they call "crusher run". This is a crushed stone that gas a lot of fines in it from the crushing process and makes fantastic base. When it goes down, you need to wet it down and run a roller over it until compacted, then let it set for a couple of days before the asphalt goes down. Get it smooth and level as it will set up very similar yo concrete due to the fines. You want the base to extends at least 6" past the edge of the planned asphalt, then taper down to the bottom of its thickness.

5. Now put down the asphalt; they should roll it when they put it down. Spray the stone base with a prime coat of oil prior to paving.

This may be more than you want to do yourself, but I would think you could hire someone to do all the work for about $4.00 to $4.50 per sqft. If you want it to truly last, this is the way to go. Also, if you want to save some money, the crusher run will make a permanent surface for you and can be paved later. Good luck!
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Old 04-15-2016, 07:18 PM   #17
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My driveway is over 500 ft long ,when I built my house 11 years ago I used a dozer to cut the topsoil out and then laid down a felt matting toped with 2-4 inch limestone and after all the lumber ,dump ,cement trucks were down topped with asphalt grindings and have done anything since till this year I will top with more, a felt or plastic mesh keeps the stone from pushing in the mud its well worth the cost and I have driven my semi on it every day and in the spring I get no pumping action when the ground if wet and soft
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Old 04-15-2016, 08:21 PM   #18
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Having more than 40 years in construction management prior to retirement, I can tell you there are no issues with recycled asphalt. Actually, there's no difference in recycled and new. The secret, though, is in the preparation of the sub grade below the asphalt and the base course (gravel layer under the asphalt). The soils in your area Dan wreak havoc if you gave clay, but as a general rule, here's what I would say you want to do.

1. Remove any muddy areas and refill with dry soil.

2. Rent a small tamper or roller and roll/tamp the area thoroughly.

3. Using your RV, drive through the area to be paved and have someone watch the wheels. If you have a soft spot, the soil will "pump", in other words it will push upward as the wheel sinks. Those areas, if any, need to be dug out and replaced with dry, compacted soil. This process is called proof rolling.

4. You want a crushed stone base course on top of the soil and below the asphalt. For typical RV loading, I would say about 4" of 3/4" stone would do but 6" would be better. The quarry will most likely have what they call "crusher run". This is a crushed stone that gas a lot of fines in it from the crushing process and makes fantastic base. When it goes down, you need to wet it down and run a roller over it until compacted, then let it set for a couple of days before the asphalt goes down. Get it smooth and level as it will set up very similar yo concrete due to the fines. You want the base to extends at least 6" past the edge of the planned asphalt, then taper down to the bottom of its thickness.

5. Now put down the asphalt; they should roll it when they put it down. Spray the stone base with a prime coat of oil prior to paving.

This may be more than you want to do yourself, but I would think you could hire someone to do all the work for about $4.00 to $4.50 per sqft. If you want it to truly last, this is the way to go. Also, if you want to save some money, the crusher run will make a permanent surface for you and can be paved later. Good luck!
I agree with this except that recycled asphalt likely would be more like granular material than new hot mix asphalt. As asphalt ages the asphalt cement oxidizes and becomes brittle. Since we apply a lot a salt on our roads in the winter that may make a difference. Up here we don't allow more than 30% recycled asphalt in new mixes. I'm not a fan of recycled concrete because we tend to get a lot of crap (rebar, wood, etc.) in it - poor quality control from local suppliers. And it doesn't drain well. Good virgin crushed granular is still relatively cheap here.

If you have a very soft subgrade, you can use a geotextile fabric to bridge the spongy soil. If it's just the odd spot that's soft, it would be cheaper to dig it out and replace it with better earth fill.
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Old 04-15-2016, 08:54 PM   #19
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RAP is Recycled Asphalt Pavement. It is combination of aggregate and asphalt (tar is a carcinogen and hasnít been used for general road construction in fifty plus years). RAP is regularly used in new asphalt pavement construction because of the existing 4 to 6% asphalt content by weight. The RAP works well as a base material. Place in three inch lifts if rolling with your truck, you can place thicker if using a roller. The advice given earlier to place at least 6 inches is good. Doesnít sound like you have a subgrade moisture problem so additional aggregate (gravel) base is probably not needed. Add a little water to aid compaction. Most RAP will be delivered moist, so dust shouldnít be a problem. If it is, a little water misting will keep down the dust and aid compaction. You are trying for the moist look, not so wet your dog and kids want to play in it. Compaction on a warm 70+ įF, sunny day works better than on a cool cloudy day. The good news is that if placed on a cold day, the RAP can be further compacted by rerolling on a warm day. Roll until it stops moving. If looking to make decorative footprints around your RAP parking pad spray first with a petroleum product like diesel. The diesel will dissolve the asphalt in the RAP making the parking pad into a giant ink pad. Anyone walking across will track footprints where ever they go, even into your nice clean trailer. A little water or a little diesel during compaction, the choice is yours.

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Old 04-15-2016, 09:03 PM   #20
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Crushed Limestone, Only way I would use asphalt is if I was going to cover it with turf or paint it.
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