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Old 07-02-2016, 02:24 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Tireman9 View Post
Rubber strength degrades with time and heat with HEAT being an over-riding contributor. Do you cover your tires with white covers? This can result is a very significant lowering of tire temperature. Every hour of full sun exposure can be equivalent to two to 3 hours of use running down the highway at top speed.

Quick example: 8 hours a day 7 days a week for two months each summer can be the equivalent of 10,000 miles use as far as rubber degradation is concerned. So if we assume a tire is good for 40,000 miles and you park it as in the above example after 3 years you may have "consumed the equivalent of 30.000 mile tire life, just while parked.

OK, OK, I hear you!! (JK!)

After being on my shopping list for far too long, I just ordered some white tire covers. As I see it, the benefits of these covers are twofold...the obvious heat/UV protection, and installing/removing them will create many excellent opportunities to get up close and personal with each tire (for inspection).
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Old 07-03-2016, 07:25 PM   #22
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IMHO, I believe a tread separation would have exponentially less resistance hitting smooth, strong metal sheet than a "metal grate". My liner is bolted directly to the unit's steel frame with large diameter SS bolts. It is meant to absorb most of the energy from a flopping tread. By no means will it go undamaged, but should provide significantly more protection than the piece of very thin sheet metal it is replacing.
The pictures below are of the stock wheel well liner that was on the unit. Good luck trying to convince me the 1/8" steel replacement wheel well will not provide more protection than the original. IMHO it's just common sense. Maybe 40#, not 500#.
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Old 07-03-2016, 08:55 PM   #23
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If others are considering designing their own protective cage to contain parts of a failing you might consider looking at what the tire industry does in the picture on this page.
Of course maybe tire test labs could save some money by using 12 GA sheet metal and a 2x2 14GA support structure.
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Old 07-03-2016, 09:40 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tireman9 View Post
If others are considering designing their own protective cage to contain parts of a failing you might consider looking at what the tire industry does in the picture on this page.
Of course maybe tire test labs could save some money by using 12 GA sheet metal and a 2x2 14GA support structure.
Only had to read far enough to see the machine was made in China. Thanks, but I'll take my chances with the "scatter shield" I had built. Guess I'm just funny that way.
My unit was designed by academics and "engineers" with scholarly backgrounds and CAD experience. So how did that work out? I don't need a Rolex to tell me what time it is when a Timex works just as well and in some cases, better. I'll endeavor to persevere with my mod.
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Old 07-03-2016, 10:01 PM   #25
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Sorry to rain on your parade but 1/8" plate will not solve your problem. Here is what we use around tire test cells. (grill on left) and this is all welded to 2" sq tubing.

Your tire can deliver about 25,000 Lbs force when it lets go and while you may not puncture the 1/8" plate I doubt that you have a support structure behind the plate that is strong enough.
Adding sufficient protection and support structure will almost certainly increase the probability of overloading one or more tires which as you know actually increases the probability of having a tire failure.

IMO you would be further ahead in preventing the failure in the first place.
This can be accomplished by using a TPMS that will warn of any air loss. 2nd you do a complete inspection once a year or every 2,000 miles.
Ensure you have at least a 15% load capacity margin for the heaviest loaded tire and run the tires at max sidewall inflation all the time.
Question concerning max sidewall pressure. I get up in the morning and it is 75 degrees and my tires read 75psi on my tpms. I know once I get on the road the ambient temp will rise and my tire temp will rise and my tires will get to 80psi+ after a short time. Is that a bad decision to think that is ok? Is 80psi at 75 degrees diffent than 80psi at 90 degrees.. I always wonder and want to be safe..
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Old 07-03-2016, 10:07 PM   #26
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Maybe one day they will have tires like below for our RVs that will not blow out under any conditions or do they have them now?
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Old 07-03-2016, 10:10 PM   #27
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Question concerning max sidewall pressure. I get up in the morning and it is 75 degrees and my tires read 75psi on my tpms. I know once I get on the road the ambient temp will rise and my tire temp will rise and my tires will get to 80psi+ after a short time. Is that a bad decision to think that is ok? Is 80psi at 75 degrees diffent than 80psi at 90 degrees.. I always wonder and want to be safe..

If you read my blog and posts from a few others who actually know about tires you will see that we say that you set the pressure before the tires get warmed up. Tires are designed to tolerate daily temperature changes.

You should never bleed air from a tire that is "Hot". In this case "hot" means having been driven on or in sunlight in previous 2 - 3 hours.

Pressure will increase by 2% for each rise in temperature of 10F. Note the internal tire temperature is usually hotter than the reading from a TPMS.
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Old 07-03-2016, 10:24 PM   #28
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Maybe one day they will have tires like below for our RVs that will not blow out under any conditions or do they have them now?

Not yet. Will need big breakthrough in polymer technology. Tire industry has been working on airless tire for 50+ years.

That tire has very specific load and speed limits. But RV owners too often feel they know better than tire engineers so I wouldn't hold your breath.
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Old 07-04-2016, 05:46 AM   #29
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What is a good low cost tpms to buy? I have it built into my TV and I got a warning 2 times.
It worked out well. Just wondering which system is good for adding on to my FR hybrid.
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Old 07-04-2016, 09:59 AM   #30
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What is a good low cost tpms to buy? I have it built into my TV and I got a warning 2 times.
It worked out well. Just wondering which system is good for adding on to my FR hybrid.
I have a post on my Blog "Best Tpms" where I identify features and benefits I think are good to be considered.

I especially like:

Lifetime warranty
Early warning as soon as tire starts to loose pressure
No 12v cord from monitor (monitor has rechargable battery)

If TPM company has the manual available for download so you can review I like that too.


Yes my blog has a sponsor but I had no say or input into who are sponsord of the blog I write for. I get no commision, never worked for and do not sell TPMS. I bought my TPMS before I started writing my blog.

I bought my TireTraker TPMS, but you need to review your wants and needs to get the unit that is best for you.
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