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Old 12-22-2018, 06:51 PM   #21
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All 4-wheel drive means is that 'maybe' you might be able to go...but does not gaurantee you can stop.

Especially since you don't have snow driving experience.
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Old 12-22-2018, 08:09 PM   #22
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I think I would recheck the chain requirements. We have lived here in snow country for over 50 years and when the chain controls go up chains have to be placed on one drive axel and one trailer axel. Does not mater if you have 4WD. It would be surprising if Colorado has different laws. Things can go real crazy when towing in the snow. Just a thought for you. Its no fun to have to turn around when you hit a chain control and you don't have any chains.

Colorado has slightly different requirements than Nevada/California chain law. We used to live in Reno and I made frequent trips over Donner Pass in the winter. I used to see people pulling 5ers getting chained up at the chain-control points. They had snow tires too, but that wasn't Colorado. I have pulled a small single-axle TT over Palo Flechado Pass east of Taos NM in a foot of snow with a good 4WD with good snow tires. Never again.
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Old 12-22-2018, 10:00 PM   #23
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I have not had to use them yet, but I have a set of chains for the truck and another set for the trailer. Trucker friend gave me the idea. It is supposed to keep the trailer from sliding past me when braking!
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Old 12-22-2018, 10:30 PM   #24
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I wondered in a 27' Terry (1995 model) when temps in South Denver dropped to a low of -15 overnight.
Furnace never quit and I ran electric heat as well. That model had water tank above the floor and all fresh water lines were in heated space. Big problem keeping holding tanks from freezing, even with heating pads added, and the city water line froze even with heat tape.

When you add up the fuel costs, possible damage to both equipment and nerves, consider flying and renting a car.
Wrong time of year to take a leisure trip into the unknowns of a Colorado winter.

From what I've seen on the news, the weather in the SE is not all that great either. Dont think you really want to possibly end up driving the entire trip in nasty weather.
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Old 12-22-2018, 10:31 PM   #25
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I wondered in a 27' Terry (1995 model) when temps in South Denver dropped to a low of -15 overnight.
Furnace never quit and I ran electric heat as well. That model had water tank above the floor and all fresh water lines were in heated space. Big problem keeping holding tanks from freezing, even with heating pads added, and the city water line froze even with heat tape.

When you add up the fuel costs, possible damage to both equipment and nerves, consider flying and renting a car.
Wrong time of year to take a leisure trip into the unknowns of a Colorado winter.

From what I've seen on the news, the weather in the SE is not all that great either. Dont think you really want to possibly end up driving the entire trip in nasty weather.
It should have said WINTERED
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Old 12-22-2018, 10:41 PM   #26
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All 4-wheel drive means is that 'maybe' you might be able to go...but does not gaurantee you can stop.

Especially since you don't have snow driving experience.
My husband actually does -- and he'll be the one driving.
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Old 12-22-2018, 11:19 PM   #27
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My husband actually does -- and he'll be the one driving.
If the roads are the least bit snow covered and/or slippery... I would NOT tow my 5'er anywhere.

I'd hunker down until the weather cleared.

And I am a very experienced snow driver...
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Old 12-22-2018, 11:45 PM   #28
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As someone who drives country (translate late to be plowed/easy to ice over) roads on a regular basis, I would be VERY hesitant to take the trailer out in that. Our windjammer served us well in November/December when we were full time living in it (yes about a tank of propane every day to day in a half), but, we were in the same spot with full hookups. Pulling a trailer that can slide around on black ice or snow is another story. Do you have to bring anything out with you for the new house, like furniture or just "stuff"? If not, I would even consider flying out. We recently went to Disney in Florida and found it was cheaper to fly from Michigan to FL rather than drive and spend nights in motels on the way. Being there for two weeks may make a difference, but, since we camp with our kids and grandchild, we are used to being able to give each other space (how about the new house - space there for two weeks?) so living together is not that big a deal - in fact we like it. Just spent 9 months in our house with them while they were building their house and we really missed them when they were gone, even though they are only 10 minutes from us now. I just don't think I would risk life and property, and cost, to do this if you don't absolutely have to. We figured that a trip of about 325 miles a day breaks even at a motel after 3 days - if you drive in a car and don't pull. You can just calculate the distance and count the days to figure the cost (we get 9.75 mpg pulling and 24 driving). There are other considerations as well and you might be fine and have great weather all the way, but, any slippery roads, high winds, etc. could make things really tough and you don't want to have an accident or get hurt or wreck your trailer during a big move when everything is unsettled. It just isn't worth you getting hurt. Negotiating some of those roads in summer is hard enough, but, pulling a trailer in winter may take you a lot longer (as someone said already) and be a lot more white knuckled than you would like. But, if the sun is out and the road is dry, it is nice to have a home base that is "yours" to live out of. Good luck in whatever decision you make. Just be careful about making it.
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Old 12-22-2018, 11:48 PM   #29
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I have made at least two dozen cross-country trips between Northern CA and Philadelphia, PA, in all seasons, in a variety of vehicles including my 1967 Corvette, a Navy roommate's Porsche, and my current Silverado Diesel and Cardinal Fifth wheel. I would urge you to leave your Fifth Wheel at home and use the available network of motels for this trip. The prospects of hitting miserable weather, or worse, losing control of your rig in a blizzard, will cause you more harm than the cost of paying motel rates.

I am 75 years old now, and I must confess, if I were 30 years younger, I might offer different advice. I now simply refuse to put my family, or my rig, or other motorists in harm's way by taking unnecessary risks.
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Old 12-23-2018, 10:35 AM   #30
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I have read where if you crack a roof vent and supplement gas furnace with electric space heaters, it will cut down on condensation. Thanks for the reminder!
Condensation comes from breathing in the space, and using the stove. Furnace does not produce humidity, so there is no difference between electric heaters and the furnace. Physics.
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