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Old 02-09-2015, 07:22 PM   #41
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GS, with an adapter, you can plug your 30 amp cord into a standard household socket. Doing this, you may be able to run JUST the A/C As long as you do not have anything else on. Typically the standard household outlet is between 15 - 20 amps. So if you are wanting to run more than just the A/C, it may be best to have a 30 amp socket and breaker installed?
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Old 03-29-2015, 11:52 AM   #42
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My Roo is not delivered yet, but I know my son melted an outside extension cord on my Popup when he decided to try to turn on the AC. I assumed I could turn on lights, and run a vacuum in the driveway using a regular ext cord, and adapter plug. But with a surge protector you think I can run the AC? I don't know if I can afford the electrician yet to add a 30 amp outlet. .???


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Old 03-29-2015, 04:02 PM   #43
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Surge Protector

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Originally Posted by Summer2Go View Post
My Roo is not delivered yet, but I know my son melted an outside extension cord on my Popup when he decided to try to turn on the AC. I assumed I could turn on lights, and run a vacuum in the driveway using a regular ext cord, and adapter plug. But with a surge protector you think I can run the AC? I don't know if I can afford the electrician yet to add a 30 amp outlet. .???


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No, I don't think you can use a surge protector to prevent overloading your extension cord if you're trying to use your AC on a 15 or 20 AMP house circuit. The reason your extension cord melted was the AC was trying to operate on a house circuit that had too small of wire to deliver the amperage (house wire, extension cord or both), or the circuit breaker was too large for the wire it was trying to protect. Either of these situations could have caused a major melt down and fire. Doing the correct installation by an electrician would be a lot cheaper than going thru rebuilding an entire home.
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