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Old 11-07-2012, 11:19 PM   #1
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Question level towing

Just got a new truck (F350 Diesel). What a beast. Plan to upgrade our Wildcat 24RL 5er in the future. In the meantime we still use the 24. Here's my issue. Even with hitch head in lowest position, the Wildcat is still a little nose high (about 1 inch from level). Can't go lower without messing with axels. Is being a little off level going to be a big issue?

A buddy who is a long haul driver didn't think it's a problem. I need a little more reassurance from the board......or do I really have a problem?

Thanks
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Old 11-07-2012, 11:45 PM   #2
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When I first got my coach, they had the hitch set with the nose high. I did reset the hitch and got the coach towing level after a few trips. It did tow better, but it was not a huge amount. I also checked all bearings for temp difference when running nose high, and they all were about the same temp. One would think that towing nose high might put more weight on the rear axle thus making the rear bearings run warmer, but in my opinion, the 1 inch nose high you talk about should not create any problems. I would try it and keep an eye on how it tows and check your bearings for heat.

Disclaimer: This is just my opinion, YMMV
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Old 11-08-2012, 09:10 AM   #3
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Your pin box also has some adjustment to it. I just had to do mine for the same reason. It was nose high.

Hitch up the 5er and then extend the landing gear to take all the weight off of the pin box. Unscrew and remove all eight bolts. Retract the landing gear enough to reinsert the bolts one hole up.

You may now have some bare steel in need of paint. Mine had been painted after it was assembled, so there was no paint under the bolts.

Joel
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Old 11-08-2012, 09:53 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andy t View Post
Just got a new truck (F350 Diesel). What a beast. Plan to upgrade our Wildcat 24RL 5er in the future. In the meantime we still use the 24. Here's my issue. Even with hitch head in lowest position, the Wildcat is still a little nose high (about 1 inch from level). Can't go lower without messing with axels. Is being a little off level going to be a big issue?

A buddy who is a long haul driver didn't think it's a problem. I need a little more reassurance from the board......or do I really have a problem?

Thanks
You always want to be at level as possible, 1" is not that far out for towing, The only thing that would be involed is that if you had slides and wanted to let them out you might have a slight problem you want to be as level as possible. The second reason is if you were to run your ref. on propane. I'm not saying you will have a problem but your ammonia system is subject to it. That is why when towing you would be okay with it on because of the motion moving. When you are not moving it will settle in at the lowest position if you did not disconnect and kept it on gas not electric. It would probably still work but not as efficiently as being level....
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Old 11-08-2012, 10:19 AM   #5
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I would think that you would get uneven loading on your axles by not towing level. This would put more pressure on the rear axle and tires. Maybe OK as long as you aren't overloading the rear axle.
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Old 11-08-2012, 03:21 PM   #6
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If the trailer has axles with leaf springs and spring equalizers then you will have no problem at all as the equalizers will keep the load equal on all the tires.I have towed trailers with as much as 4" differance from front to back with no problems at all.The fridge will work ok with 1" out of level.If you were to check across the roofs of all the trailers at a campground you would be hard pressed to find more than 2-3 that are level with each other.If you want to leave the trailer hooked up when parked,you may have to put blocks under the tires.
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Old 11-08-2012, 05:31 PM   #7
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Okay Grizzly. Thanks for the tip..........but now you're getting technical on me. Spring equalizers? The axels have leaf springs but how can I tell if there are equalizers? Dunno what they look like.
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Old 11-08-2012, 06:35 PM   #8
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wait a second. Could the equalizer be that wishbone bracket between the front and rear wheels that the front and rear springs attach to? Kinda looks like it would equalize the load if there's a tilt in the rig.
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Old 11-08-2012, 06:41 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andy t
wait a second. Could the equalizer be that wishbone bracket between the front and rear wheels that the front and rear springs attach to? Kinda looks like it would equalize the load if there's a tilt in the rig.
They are to equalize against rough or rolling terrain NOT for excessive tilt forward or rearward because UN level trailer.
The more the unit is out of level whilst towing the more stress that's applied to the axle .
Front high = more rear axle pressure.
Front low = more front axle pressure.

Turbs
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Old 11-08-2012, 10:38 PM   #10
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Yes the equilizer will.....equilize the suspension on spring trailers for uneven axle difference.

To answer the op question, pull the front axle on blocks till the rear axle is off the ground and measure that difference in axle to frame on both axles. That would be max suspention travel.

If your tow position has the axles in a range that is 1/2 way between( like 12" on front and 8" rear. No more less than 10" on front and no more than 10" on rear) these measurements then you should be safe from a suspension standpoint on a double axle trailer.

I find that mine has less chucking when higher in front then level. But I live and travel by the dreaded I-40 east of OKC so chucking is a big problem around here.

Just my 2 pennys
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