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Old 02-15-2014, 05:52 PM   #21
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PT here. I've guided thousands of patients through the TKR/THR recoveries over my 20 year career. So here's the skinny on THR. Best therapy is walking--the goal for rehab is to get that leg used to bearing your weight again. You already have all the range of motion you need right out of surgery--that's why they tell you not to cross your legs, turn your operated leg toes in, or flex your hip past 90*, since you don't want it dislocating (a very rare occurrence.) The joint is very durable and, short of having a very forceful accident (car crash with knees into the dash, falling down a flight of steps, etc) there's really not anything you can do to damage it. If you over-do it, your muscles (which were cut through during surgery) will be sore, but that gets better. I'm not a big fan of the "no pain, no gain" theory--that's fine when you're training for the Olympics or professional sports. But after orthopedic surgery, pain is your body's way of telling you, "that's enough, dummy." You most likely don't have any weight restrictions, so you want to walk and do steps as able--I usually start my patients stepping up onto a small step with the operated leg when they can, and gradually progress to a regular step. Unless your orthopedic surgeon doesn't want you to be full weight bearing for some reason. But if you have no restrictions, get up and walk. As mentioned earlier, NO IMPACT. So running, any court sports, and anything that might involve falling are out. Hiking, swimming, bicycle riding, and plain old walking are all good. Shoot me a PM if you have any other concerns. Good luck!
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Old 02-15-2014, 06:10 PM   #22
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Sorry to hear of your accident rawlus....In my case our family has a case of bad genetics. My dad has had both hips replaced and my older sister has had one of hers replaced also.

On a much brighter note I went back to my doctor for the first time since my surgery yesterday. The ex rays they took show everything to be good. I had been working hard at home doing some physical therapy exercises at home so when the doc asked me to show him how much movement and strength I had regained in the new hip he was quite impressed. He gave me some new exercises to do and said if I continue to work hard and let my body tell me when to slow down he sees no need for me to go to a physical therapist at this time. He had me on a weight restriction for a while and now said to go ahead and work up to full weight, mentioning that walking would be the best thing to a full and speedy recovery. Being winter around here and ice on the ground outside I have been walking around the house quite a bit. I have never been afraid to push myself when it comes to working hard at something. I took this as being very encouraging and great news.
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Old 02-15-2014, 06:28 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taranwanderer View Post
PT here. I've guided thousands of patients through the TKR/THR recoveries over my 20 year career. So here's the skinny on THR. Best therapy is walking--the goal for rehab is to get that leg used to bearing your weight again. You already have all the range of motion you need right out of surgery--that's why they tell you not to cross your legs, turn your operated leg toes in, or flex your hip past 90*, since you don't want it dislocating (a very rare occurrence.) The joint is very durable and, short of having a very forceful accident (car crash with knees into the dash, falling down a flight of steps, etc) there's really not anything you can do to damage it. If you over-do it, your muscles (which were cut through during surgery) will be sore, but that gets better. I'm not a big fan of the "no pain, no gain" theory--that's fine when you're training for the Olympics or professional sports. But after orthopedic surgery, pain is your body's way of telling you, "that's enough, dummy." You most likely don't have any weight restrictions, so you want to walk and do steps as able--I usually start my patients stepping up onto a small step with the operated leg when they can, and gradually progress to a regular step. Unless your orthopedic surgeon doesn't want you to be full weight bearing for some reason. But if you have no restrictions, get up and walk. As mentioned earlier, NO IMPACT. So running, any court sports, and anything that might involve falling are out. Hiking, swimming, bicycle riding, and plain old walking are all good. Shoot me a PM if you have any other concerns. Good luck!
Just missed your post before I posted mine...Sounds like you know your PT stuff..I appreciate your post and the information you posted in it. My doctor warned be about the possible movements which can lead to dislocations. He said that in surgery they actually dislocate your hip so they can work on it by putting in one of those spots and until things heal and get back to strength re-dislocating it is a possibility. The only real pain I have is a slight one in the area of my inner groin. The doc said it is probably from the way they torqued my leg around while working on the hip. Letting your muscles guide you is so true, yesterday I wanted to get out of the house and walk so I went to Costco with the wife. Still using my crutches I walked all around the store while she shopped. Today I noticed i'm a little sorer then i have been and I am just sticking to some exercises and not walking as much.

Everything you stated above is true and very valid to my situation. Once again thanks for your knowledge and sharing it with the rest of us...
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Old 02-17-2014, 09:33 PM   #24
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Taranwanderer, I had PT after the TKR. When I first went in the PT set a box of Kleenex next to me and said, "Here, you're going to need these."

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