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Old 04-21-2013, 02:48 PM   #1
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power awning/support poles

We bought or first camper, Grey Wolf 28bh, got it home and it hasn't stopped snowing here in MN. While I am shoveling around the thing I am coming up with a couple questions...

First being about the support poles. Do a lot of people use these? One thing I especially like about the power awning is the open feeling, not having those support arms to walk into, like on the manual awnings.

With the supports, you have the poles then again the tie downs to trip on. My question is, what kind of weather or wind will these with stand, do you leave them set up the whole time you are camping? I was told any wind over 10-15mph, put the awning away.

Another question being about the power awning. Is there a way to angle the awning like a manual awnings for dew and light rain.

Thanks in advance for all the answers and advice.
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Old 04-21-2013, 02:56 PM   #2
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PM a member by the name Old Coot. If you need to find him he has post on the Phat Phrog thread. He would be able to tell ya and he actually has made some that he has for sale. Quite a few members have bought these off of him.

I haven't since we don't use it awnings that much

Good luck and just tell him I sent ya!!!
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Old 04-21-2013, 03:11 PM   #3
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Where I live, you must always be aware of the wind with your awning out. Wind gust are the worst. I use tie down straps and barbells as weights to prevent blow over. The set up can still get in the way, but I can leave the awning out i in higher winds than without it. Your awning can be angled by moving one arm in more tan the other.

Attached photo showing how I weight my awning down.
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Old 04-21-2013, 03:22 PM   #4
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Yes, you can tilt the power awnings from side to side. The awning poles have been used in winds as high as 25 mph without harm. The material will flutter, but the arms will not bang up & down and try to destroy themselves when you use the poles and ratchet straps. You can see some of the poles if you visit Forest River Forums - OldCoot's Album: Power Awning Tie Down (Self Storing)
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Old 04-21-2013, 04:49 PM   #5
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Thanks everyone. I saw the ones he is selling, and was just curious to the amount of people that use something like that. I like your system Vinster, looks simple. How about just putting two screw in anchors with out the poles. I understand not to over tighten the straps, but it would have to help with shaking everything.

About tilting the awning, I have one button so I can't run one side up higher than the other.
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Old 04-21-2013, 04:59 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by jsKuchinka View Post
Thanks everyone. I saw the ones he is selling, and was just curious to the amount of people that use something like that. I like your system Vinster, looks simple. How about just putting two screw in anchors with out the poles. I understand not to over tighten the straps, but it would have to help with shaking everything.

About tilting the awning, I have one button so I can't run one side up higher than the other.
Not quite that simple jkKuchinka, the wind still gets under the awning and pulls the arms up and down without poles and ratchet straps. You will just have to try it and see for yourself.
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Old 04-21-2013, 05:27 PM   #7
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OldCoot, do you have these pretty much year round, just have to save up some cash and I will be buying a set from you!

With your system, what mph of wind do you take them down
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Old 04-21-2013, 05:34 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by jsKuchinka View Post
OldCoot, do you have these pretty much year round, just have to save up some cash and I will be buying a set from you!

With your system, what mph of wind do you take them down
Right now I have 9 sets left and that will be the end of them. Material is too hard to find and I'm tired of making them.

I have had my awning out in 25 mph winds and the awning material starts fluttering and is a little disturbing, so when the wind died down a little, we brought it in. The arms were still holding still, but the noise was very annoying. We never take it down in the rain.
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Old 04-21-2013, 05:49 PM   #9
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The only thing I would be concerned about is if there was a sustained strong wind, then they forcast even worse conditions and I wanted to bring the awning in. That would mean having to retract it in conditions that could destroy it.
Without having any means of tying it down, we just err on the side of caution and roll it up on windy days.
I really wish I had optioned a manual awning in place of the electric one we got. I didn't realise beforehand just how flimsy they are.
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Old 04-21-2013, 05:58 PM   #10
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The only thing I would be concerned about is if there was a sustained strong wind, then they forcast even worse conditions and I wanted to bring the awning in. That would mean having to retract it in conditions that could destroy it.
Without having any means of tying it down, we just err on the side of caution and roll it up on windy days.
I really wish I had optioned a manual awning in place of the electric one we got. I didn't realise beforehand just how flimsy they are.
Agree somewhat bakken other than I like the electric over the manual. We've rolled the electric in with sustained winds/rain and it takes two people, DW on one pole holding one ratchet strap, me holding the other along with the remote. Not pleasant if it's raining, but we've done it a couple of times. Easier than doing a manual in the same conditions which we've also done several times.
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