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Old 04-15-2013, 07:33 PM   #1
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Recumbent trike? -Touring the campgrounds

Does anyone pedal themselves around using a recumbent trike? If so, I'd like some info regarding brands, likes/dislikes and maybe what to watch for.
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Old 04-16-2013, 07:32 AM   #2
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Just changed the subject line so maybe now someone will see and reply?
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Old 04-16-2013, 08:55 AM   #3
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arjerram. I don't have any actual experience, but thought I'd try and help anyhow. I've researched recumbent trikes myself, and found out a couple things. First and foremost, they are very expensive. The "cheapest" trikes I've found start at $700, but quickly go up when you start looking at options that make the bike more useful. The other thing I've found is that a lot of recumbent trikes are built for racing/touring and are in the $3500 range. Very light weight, etc. Try terratrike.com for a start. Hope this helps.
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Old 04-16-2013, 09:04 AM   #4
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I always thought they looked very comfortable, and would be a lot easier on my back. But I wouldn't ride one anywhere there was auto traffic, as they are so low to the ground, and some idiot driver would eventually run right over me.
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Old 04-16-2013, 09:22 AM   #5
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I'm a pretty experienced cyclist and when I belonged to a club, there were a few. Also, I've been on many week-long bike tours. Many on tour had these. I've seen them on day tours or week-long tours, trekking 60 miles a day. So, there's no limit.
They are harder on the up-hills cuz you can't stand.
Easier on the back and that's the main reason they got them.
You are low and that impairs how visible you are to traffic....please please please get a fluorescent flag on a tall stick to wave above you for cars to see.
Yes, they are expensive, but most serious bikes are.
Just because you're "sitting", doesn't excuse you from a helmet, plz.

In general, cycling is great exercise and low impact. I've known many people in their 70s who ride centuries.....that's 100 miles in a day. Can't do that with many other sports because injuries will get you before that.
Brands: Trek is my favorite, but we currently own Specialized...more for the money. Trek, IMO, has outpriced themselves because of the fame garnered from Armstrong. I'm not as in love with my Specialized though as I was my Trek, so maybe that's a lesson. But like many industries, all the key parts come from limited makers and are assembled by the mfgrs...kind of like RVs. Buying a bike gets very complicated when you get into specifics of materials and grades. Test drive!!
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Old 04-16-2013, 10:14 AM   #6
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Okay, can't help myself.
If you're going to do limited riding, start with a steal alloy (chromoly). Most comfortable because it's "flexible" albeit a little heavy, but priced lower, and you don't need anything better for small to medium rides. Aluminum is super light, but not as "flexible", so you'll feel bumps more. Carbon is supreme....light, flexible, the envy of cyclists, but expect to pay about $5k.
Don't get the lowest grade de-railers in the class...you'll get frustrated at how catchy they are in shifting. For limited riding, don't get top of the line either...oy....do they get expensive!
Warning: Cycling is addictive. With my first bike, started three miles at a time.
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Old 04-16-2013, 10:54 AM   #7
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Is it the fact that you can sit down and not worry about balance that you find the trike attractive?
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Old 04-16-2013, 11:20 AM   #8
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I saw one of these the other day in our town. If I had the extra money i would look at getting one for me and the DW.

Found these at: Adult Tricycles, Recumbent Trikes, Industrial Trikes, Bikes




Or this looks cool.



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Old 04-17-2013, 07:13 AM   #9
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The problem to me at least is these 2 pictured trikes are huge. How to you
take one camping??
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Old 04-17-2013, 08:04 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bakken View Post
I always thought they looked very comfortable, and would be a lot easier on my back. But I wouldn't ride one anywhere there was auto traffic, as they are so low to the ground, and some idiot driver would eventually run right over me.
My neighbor has a hand crank trike that he regularly rides on the street. He has two orange flags attached to poles on the back for visibility. But from the perspective of a auto driver, seeing orange flags coming down the street does not register with the brain the same as seeing a bike. Most of us look for familiar dangers and don't always recognize unfamiliar signs for what they are as quickly. It takes a few seconds for the flags to catch the drivers attention so the rider needs to be extra cautious.

My neighbor regularly does 20 mile rides with his hand crank trike. The guy has amazing shoulders. I am not sure I could keep up with him on my bike.
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