Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-22-2010, 09:42 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
ladywendolyn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 164
We definitely agree with the turning the tanks off when refuelling . . .it only makes sense. It is good to be well informed . . . I remember my dad fuelling the car with a cigarette hanging out of his mouth when I was a kid.
Coincidently, last week I sat in on a fire safety training with the fire dept. /arson squad, because we have foster children, so we need to take this training once per year.
As well as the situations you just mentioned, The fire fighter trainer told us that you should never fill a Jerry can with gas, while it is in a truck bed. That there is a big build up of static electricity the exists in truck beds (not sure why), and there are numerous explosions from this each year , so always fill them on the ground! . . . who would have
thought??
__________________

__________________


Lady Wendolyn

2003 21 ft Forrest River Shamrock

Manitoba Canada
ladywendolyn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2010, 10:01 AM   #12
Site Team - Lou
 
Herk7769's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: South Eastern PA
Posts: 21,169
Quote:
Originally Posted by ladywendolyn View Post
The fire fighter trainer told us that you should never fill a Jerry can with gas, while it is in a truck bed. That there is a big build up of static electricity the exists in truck beds (not sure why), and there are numerous explosions from this each year , so always fill them on the ground! . . . who would have
thought??
There is a video on U-tube showing a pickup truck exploding in flames because of a gas can fill up on the bed of the truck.

I always "ground" the plastic can (is it still a can if it is plastic? ) and make sure the nozzle touches the inside of the filler spout while filling.

This bleeds off the static charge between the nozzle and the plastic. The static builds up very fast (high fuel flow rate makes more static) and it does take time for it to dissipate through the plastic to the ground. If you just squirt it in to the can, the static has to travel through the fuel to get to the ground.
__________________

__________________

Lou and Laura with Bella - German Short Hair Pointer
2008 GMC Sierra 2500HD Crewcab SB Allison Duramax
2010 Flagstaff 8526RLWS - Superglide 3300
HAM CALLSIGN - KC3FFW
Herk7769 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2010, 01:17 PM   #13
Moderator Emeritus
 
MtnGuy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Shenandoah Valley
Posts: 9,274
Quote:
Originally Posted by rockwood06 View Post
Why is it that people take chances? Propane is highly flammable, it is heaver then air and collects at the lowest point, the more that collects the bigger the boom not that it matters at that point.
Not only for your sake but everyone else around you the tanks should be shut off before you pull up to the fuel pumps no matter if it is gasoline or diesel. One spark at the fuel pumps from a leaking propane tank and the entire gas station and the people around will disappear from the earth.
All you need is is static discharge from a cell phone around a leaky propane tank from your camper while pumping fuel and I am sorry but I have a real problem when it comes to safety......cell phones is another issue at gas stations.
I agree with Wade that propane can be a dangerous liquid/gas. But a leaking propane system at the gas pumps would not be my biggest concern. Most of the time, people are careful at the gas pumps……but I still see the occasional coffin nail hanging form someone’s mouth while pumping gas……I get out of there as quick as possible.

I think the more dangerous area to have a leaking propane system is when campers stop for lunch at restaurants or stop for a break at a rest area. People are walking by the camper all of the time puffing away…….oblivious that 60 lbs. of propane are a few feet away.

A closed propane system is not a worry. If you can’t smell the added odorant, then an explosion is unlikely. If you can smell the odorant, then the system needs to be shut down until the leak can be fixed.

The concern at gas stations should be the fact that there is an open flame providing heat needed for an absorption refrigerator. In the case of my setup, the open flame is 30’ away from the nozzle, and 4’ up off of the ground. Fumes from any spilled gas should hug the ground around the spill. In the case of no wind, the fumes should stay in that area. In breezy conditions, the gas fumes should dissipate to a mixture that is not combustible before it gets anywhere near my fridge. My biggest concern at a gas pump is where there are 2 pumps per island, where I pull up to the furthest pump and my camper is near the 2nd pump. In that case, someone sloppy pumping on the other side could cause a problem being so close to the open fridge flame. Again, the fumes would be 6’ away, but I can see the potential there. The solution there would be to shut down the propane, and cut it back on after leaving the pumps.

A much more dangerous RV scenario is in the smaller Class Bs, Cs, and maybe some As where the gas fill is within a couple feet of the fridge.

Having a truck camper and a pop-up with ice boxes, and a Trailmanor with a 3 way fridge, this is the 1st camper that I have owned with a 2 way fridge. That took a little getting used to, and I read up as much as possible on the pros and cons with leaving the propane on. I know it has to be safer to go down the road with the propane off, but it just ain’t practical. I want my beer cold after a day of driving……..that is the 1st chore on my setup list…..have beer.

Like Wade, I too have a real problem when it comes to safety. If there were a practical and safer way to keep my food cold, then I would do it. But on the bigger fridges that are now put in our conventional campers, propane seems to be the best option. There was a thread a while back that used an inverter to power their fridge on 110 volt during transit, but it looked rather involved, and I never did hear how well it worked.
__________________

Chap , DW Joy, and Fur Baby Sango
2017 F350 Lariat CCSB, SRW, 4x4, 6.7 PS
2017 Grand Design Reflection 337RLS
MtnGuy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2010, 01:38 PM   #14
Site Team - Lou
 
Herk7769's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: South Eastern PA
Posts: 21,169
ooorah

I too like a cold brew right after setting up.

Since I hate hauling ice to the campground for no good reason, The only cold beer is in the fridge.
__________________

Lou and Laura with Bella - German Short Hair Pointer
2008 GMC Sierra 2500HD Crewcab SB Allison Duramax
2010 Flagstaff 8526RLWS - Superglide 3300
HAM CALLSIGN - KC3FFW
Herk7769 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2010, 09:38 AM   #15
Member
 
dichayer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 83
Quote:
cell phones is another issue at gas stations.
That is true. They are also a big problem while piloting your RV down the road.

I have my frig on all the way when I drive from NH to Indiana 2 times a year. My frige is on the copilot side on my truck and the gas cap is on the drivers side. I do not turn it off while I am gassing up.
Dick
__________________
dichayer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2010, 12:02 PM   #16
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 65
I found my fridge runs off the battery or hook up to the truck while driving...never had a warm fridge even after a 10 hour trip.
__________________
masonga is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2010, 01:57 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Maple Ridge, BC, Canada
Posts: 635
Quote:
Originally Posted by masonga View Post
I found my fridge runs off the battery or hook up to the truck while driving...never had a warm fridge even after a 10 hour trip.
You must have a 3-way fridge (110VAC, 12DC & propane) - These are rare birds and usually found on tent trailers only. TT's, 5er's and MH these days usually are just 110VAC and Propane.

...VTX-AL
__________________
VTX Al is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2010, 02:27 PM   #18
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by VTX Al View Post
You must have a 3-way fridge (110VAC, 12DC & propane) - These are rare birds and usually found on tent trailers only. TT's, 5er's and MH these days usually are just 110VAC and Propane.

...VTX-AL
Either that or it is just well insulated...I turn it on at least 24 hours prior to departure to let it get good and cold before we leave....
__________________
masonga is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2010, 02:30 PM   #19
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 59
If cell phones at a gas pump are dangerous, why are there no signs prohibiting their use while pumping gas? I have never seen a lit cigarette ignite gasoline or the fumes of gasoline. I have put cigarettes out in a coffee can filled with gasoline without incident. While I am not telling y'all to run out and do all that, some people need to loosen up a bit. If you had to worry about propane in a moving trailer, then the accumulation inside the trailer from a leaking line would be my biggest concern. However with my trailer, it the line leaked and it blew up, my problems with my POS Concertone 7X75 would be over.
__________________
Frank and Jean
Retired Navy
DAV Life Member
'09 Rockwood Roo 233s
'03 1500 Silverado LS

I didn't say it was your fault, I said I was going to blame you.
It may be that your sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others.
The things that come to those that wait will be the scraggly crappy junk left by those that got there first.
popeye59 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2010, 02:46 PM   #20
Site Team - Lou
 
Herk7769's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: South Eastern PA
Posts: 21,169
A little Chemistry

Gasoline is not flammable. Gasoline VAPORS are. If the gas is cold enough the vapor pressure is so low there are not enough vapors to support combustion (too lean a mixture).

Gasoline vapors on the other hand are explosively flammable.

A lit cigarette, RF energy from your cell phone, or static electricity from filling a plastic gas can can ignite vapors from a LONG way away if the temperature is high enough.

You can demonstrate this yourself by smelling for fuel while filling your tank. In the summer, the smell of gasoline is very strong. In the winter you may not be able to smell it at all.

So, you say. Why does my car start in the winter? Well, Virginia, the older engines used a choke and engine compression lower the atmospheric pressure and atomize the fuel in the intake manifold. This lower pressure allows vapors to form at much lower temperatures.

Newer engines with fuel injection atomize the fuel in the chamber and compression does the rest.

No choke needed in summer. Guess why?

Popeye PS:

There are cell phone signs at most of the stations I have used. You might need to look for them. They have that circle with a bar through them.
__________________

__________________

Lou and Laura with Bella - German Short Hair Pointer
2008 GMC Sierra 2500HD Crewcab SB Allison Duramax
2010 Flagstaff 8526RLWS - Superglide 3300
HAM CALLSIGN - KC3FFW
Herk7769 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:57 AM.