Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-22-2015, 07:31 AM   #21
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 266
I'm brand new to having an electric awning. I was thinking that when the wind was in the "middle ground" or at night, I would retract leaving about a quarter of it out. Enough to shade right at the trailer and protect from rain/dew. It seems a lot tighter and sturdier when retracted that much.

Of course, a storm is a different situation, but this should be a compromise for calm rains, etc.
__________________

__________________
tragusa3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2015, 08:50 AM   #22
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Independence, Kansas
Posts: 619
I agree with Pipeman, there are some parts of the country that are not safe to use an awning because of sudden gusts out of nowhere. I have been at the Archview Campground just north of Moab, Utah camping on a clear calm sunny day when a sudden wind came through that was so strong it actually picked up sand and gravel and stung so bad you had to take shelter. When it was over, tents were down, many people were in their cars, lawn chairs were scattered and supplies that were not secured were lost. I had my satellite dish destroyed in one of these winds.
__________________

__________________
comfun1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2015, 10:21 AM   #23
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Eastern Ontario
Posts: 475
Personally I would much prefer a manual awning over an electric one.
The frame is a lot stronger, and you can drop your legs down to secure it to the ground.
The electric ones, wich seems to be the norm now...the arms seems cheap, not strong enough, you can't tie them down properly without poles and you can't pitch them down as much as the manual ones, specially when you want to clean.
The little motor that acts and quite working...probably not strong enough for the job...I have a 20' awning, so it's quite a piece of fabric to roll !
If I had the choice...I would definitely go with manual awning... but they now cost more than the electric.
But that's just me ! Low tech man in a High tech world!
__________________
Black
2014 Ford F250 Lariat SuperCrew 4x4 tuxedo black
2015 Rockwood Signature 8310SS Diamond Edition
***3rd GENERATION EGG FARMER***
***WHO MADE YOUR EGGS TODAY ?
Black is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2015, 10:49 AM   #24
Senior Member
 
mark0224's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 1,443
Even with poles and tie downs it is a best guess, You need to tip one end even if you have auto dump, If you go away be smart put it in so if unexpected wind comes up your safe, When your at the trailer and the wind that makes you uncomfortable bring it in. This is one of those thing only you can decide anything others may say might be alright for them but not for you. Best advice I can give you is pick your site carefully and try to put the opposite side in the wind so the awning doesn't get much. Most of the time you can tell which direction the wind will come from, Check weather report in morning and you should have an idea what you will need to do for that day.
__________________
Think about things before you do them make life easier not harder.
mark0224 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2015, 03:03 PM   #25
Senior Member
 
mjones12's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Lexington, NC
Posts: 1,826
Quote:
Originally Posted by Black View Post
Personally I would much prefer a manual awning over an electric one.
The frame is a lot stronger, and you can drop your legs down to secure it to the ground.
The electric ones, wich seems to be the norm now...the arms seems cheap, not strong enough, you can't tie them down properly without poles and you can't pitch them down as much as the manual ones, specially when you want to clean.
The little motor that acts and quite working...probably not strong enough for the job...I have a 20' awning, so it's quite a piece of fabric to roll !
If I had the choice...I would definitely go with manual awning... but they now cost more than the electric.
But that's just me ! Low tech man in a High tech world!
Having had both types, I tend to agree with you. As to dropping the poles on the manual and securing them to the ground, I have always been told to leave the poles attached to the bottom of the camper in high winds for more strength and stability.
__________________

__________________
2018 Coachmen Apex 249 RBS
2010 Silverado LT 5.3 V8


The world is a great book, of which those who never stir from home
read only a page. - St. Augustine
mjones12 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
awning

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:25 PM.