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Old 06-11-2015, 09:47 AM   #61
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Elind said, "Also RV propane fridges don't have pilot lights."

In nearly everything I have read about RV refrigerators, they use a type of "boiling ammonia" for cooling the unit. To get the ammonia to work properly, it has to "boil" to remove the heat. The fridge in our fiver uses this. When the propane is turned on, the battery sends current to the striker that lights the pilot light so the flame starts. I can even hear the striker clicking while trying to light the propane. After the flame starts and is continuous, you can feel the heat of the flame through the baffles.

All this being said, I am not sure I agree with your statement about not having a pilot light.

We always travel with the fridge on. When we stop at the CG, it switches automatically to electric like most other fridges.
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Old 06-11-2015, 11:21 AM   #62
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It's not a pilot light, a pilot light is there to light the main fire. An rv fridge uses the spark igniter to light the main fire.
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Old 06-11-2015, 11:53 AM   #63
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It's called "dsi" Direct spark ignition.
No pilot light whatsoever.

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Old 06-11-2015, 12:33 PM   #64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Genealdr View Post
Elind said, "Also RV propane fridges don't have pilot lights."

In nearly everything I have read about RV refrigerators, they use a type of "boiling ammonia" for cooling the unit. To get the ammonia to work properly, it has to "boil" to remove the heat. The fridge in our fiver uses this. When the propane is turned on, the battery sends current to the striker that lights the pilot light so the flame starts. I can even hear the striker clicking while trying to light the propane. After the flame starts and is continuous, you can feel the heat of the flame through the baffles.

All this being said, I am not sure I agree with your statement about not having a pilot light.

We always travel with the fridge on. When we stop at the CG, it switches automatically to electric like most other fridges.
What you hear is the DSI lighting the burner, there is no pilot on the DSI refrigerators.
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Old 06-12-2015, 10:07 PM   #65
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Worried about having a blowout. The propane plumbing can be ripped by a flailing tire.


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Old 06-12-2015, 10:16 PM   #66
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It is illegal here in Ontario to travel with your propane on.
Really??!? ...Oops.

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Old 06-12-2015, 11:04 PM   #67
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I just had to go look.. Ontario's prohibition re: traveling with propane tanks "on". It may have been in there at some point in time, but spending the last while reviewing Ontario's Highway Traffic Act, R.S.O revisions from Dec, 2012 to current, there is no such law at this time, and no prohibition from the Ministry of Transportation other than to limit the quantity that can be carried (recreational vehicles are limited to 2 - 60# tanks. Providing they are connected to a regulator and secured in or on the vehicle.).

Did you know it was against the law to ride a horse on the King's Highway though?

They DID have some interesting information I didn't know before.

Propane as a Fuel

Propane is non-toxic – it will not contaminate the soil or the surrounding environment.
Propane is odourized – an odourant called Ethyl Mercaptan is added to propane so that leaks are easily detected.
Propane is lead-free.
Propane contains extremely low levels of sulphur.
Propane has the lowest flammability range of all alternative fuels (2.4 – 9.5%) – so there must be the right combination of propane and oxygen, if there is too much or too little propane it will not burn.
Propane’s ignition temperature is approximately 920 - 1020F, gasoline’s ignition temperature is 495F – therefore, gasoline will burn or explode at a much lower temperature than propane.


I feel better now.
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Old 06-12-2015, 11:45 PM   #68
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I always have mine on just read this though.....This is from the Canadian Propane Association>>>>
If you and your family use a recreational vehicle (R.V.) or camper it is important to ensure all users are familiar with the manufacturer's written operating and maintenance instructions. If you are renting, ask for safety instructions. Use the same care and diligence when tending to the propane systems in your R.V. or camper as you would for those in your home or business. With respect to regulations specific to the use of R.V.s and campers in Canada:

In many provinces, regular inspection of the propane system on board by a qualified service technician is mandatory.
In most provinces, it's law that all appliances and pilot lights must be turned off and cylinder valves closed while travelling.
Contact the provincial Motor Vehicle Branch where you own, rent or operate an R.V. or camper to inquire about requirements that may apply to you.,
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Old 06-13-2015, 12:14 AM   #69
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I always have mine on just read this though.....This is from the Canadian Propane Association>>>>
Trans-Canada Highway recommends having:

"Small cooler chest, for groceries (some people don't like to drive with the fridge propane turned on, which means that on long drives the fridge may warm up; and some people find their RV fridge to be too small for their needs on a long trip)"

Fun fun.. but I'm done.
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