Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-31-2012, 11:44 AM   #21
Graduate Member
 
RoadTrip's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Columbia, MO
Posts: 508
Quote:
Originally Posted by rawlus View Post
Have you thought about radiant electric floor heat like is used for residential installation? A more permanent solution, takes up no floor space, nothing to setup each trip, controlled by thermostat, etc. thermosoft is one brand but there are many others, often used in bathroom or kitchen renovations and easily DIY.

We only have a small A frame popup and use a micathermic radiant heater for the off-season camping, takes up little space and makes no noise whatsoever (no moving parts)
hmmmm...that sounds interesting. Can I just lay it down on top of the existing linoleum and walk on it?
__________________

__________________
--2009 Sunseeker 2860DS (Class C)
- one Hotwife, and two boys under 2(with one on the way!)
2013 - 53 days
2012 - 26 days

RoadTrip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2012, 11:49 AM   #22
Graduate Member
 
RoadTrip's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Columbia, MO
Posts: 508
Quote:
Originally Posted by KyDan View Post
To a certain degree (no pun intended) amps can be converted to Watts and watts
to BTUs which are heat.
So if you get a 1400 watt heater, you are gonna get pretty much the same BTU over
various brands. Some have blowers, some don't. Some are oil filled, some are ceramic.
These have different effects. Oil filled don't use a blower and they tend to level out
the heat rather than off/on - warm/cold cycle of say one with a blower.
Oil filled are pretty much silent. Blowers make noise.
The bottom line is if 1400 watts won't keep up you need more watts.
One way to do that is with an extension cord stuck in thru the slide out gasket
which is plugged into the campground power post in the 120v duplex outlet.
This way you won't trip the outlet breaker in your trailer by plugging 2 heaters
in inside your RV.
If your question pertains to keeping your RV warm while parked at home the answer
is still more heaters using more watts and spending more $$ on your electric bill.
Electricity is cheaper than LP whether it's at home or in a campground.

My 2˘
Exactly the answer I've come too. I appreciate all the posters, but I can't find anyone saying my one (1) space heater kept me toasty at 70 all night without a furnace in 30 degrees.

So I need two heaters. Doesn't matter much which two, except personal preference (noise, evenness, ease of travel, etc).

And btw, good idea on the extension cord through the gasket. I might use that - although I think I can plug both heaters in - one 12amp and one 8 should be fine. Plus I'd rather avoid the extension cord with the space heater.
__________________

__________________
--2009 Sunseeker 2860DS (Class C)
- one Hotwife, and two boys under 2(with one on the way!)
2013 - 53 days
2012 - 26 days

RoadTrip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2012, 11:59 AM   #23
Graduate Member
 
RoadTrip's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Columbia, MO
Posts: 508
Quote:
Originally Posted by VinceU View Post
Just keep in mind a 1500 watt heater is approx 1.5KW. The fixed heaters are from 15,000 to 35000 btu's. I just converted a 35k btu gas furnace to elec 1500 watt for comparison. It would take about 6.8 small elec heaters to match the output of the "big guys". I use both a firepllace at 1100 watts and a floor heater of 1500 watts. Sometimes ya just gotta kick in the big guy.
Lol - as I read this it's snowing. I think you're right, and just hope I can push our "must have" furnace nights into the 20's. But it might stay in the 30's and with two we're just supplementing the furnace. No biggie.

But that vornado sure does look interesting.....
__________________
--2009 Sunseeker 2860DS (Class C)
- one Hotwife, and two boys under 2(with one on the way!)
2013 - 53 days
2012 - 26 days

RoadTrip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2012, 12:04 PM   #24
Graduate Member
 
RoadTrip's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Columbia, MO
Posts: 508
oh, and this is totally about sleeping IN the RV. I'm not storing it and trying to keep it above freezing or anything. See my avatar - that's our RV parked in the garage. I don't even winterize!

I kept reading about the infrared bulbs being fragile, but with actual confirmation, I think I'm going to go with adding the vornado. Plus we have a trip in a few weeks - so I can see how it works.
__________________
--2009 Sunseeker 2860DS (Class C)
- one Hotwife, and two boys under 2(with one on the way!)
2013 - 53 days
2012 - 26 days

RoadTrip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2012, 12:27 PM   #25
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Splendora, Texas
Posts: 1,229
Two heaters of the type you use will not keep my 5er at a toasty temp all night in 30 degree weather. The bedroom one is ok but not the living area. You need to stand right next to it to feel good. We use them to assist with the furance.
We try to keep ahead of the weather and not be any place that is going to be cold.

Last summer, July, at Excapee's in Livingston, TX, were you pay for metered Electric
at 12.5 cents per KWH, it was more then $5 per day to run two ACs, one 15,000 and the other 13,500.
__________________
whj77372 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2012, 12:48 PM   #26
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Milford, MA
Posts: 441
The electric radiant floor heat is meant to go underneath the floor covering, tile, wood, vinyl, etc. so yes you walk on it, but no, you can't lay it on top of the linoleum. You'd have to peel it up and put it underneathm or put it on the Lino and then put another flooring over it
__________________
2011 A-122
rawlus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2012, 01:14 PM   #27
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Langley, BC
Posts: 582
I personally think an electric heater is a great idea. Furnaces are very noisy. We used ours once and couldn't take the noise so I installed a 1KW, semi-recessed, hard-wired heater in the ceiling near the A/C unit as in this photo. It runs on a low voltage thermostat on the wall that looks exactly like the one for the furnace. All wiring is hidden in the walls and ceiling and looks like a factory install. Our trailer is on the smaller side at 20' and is a single area except for the bathroom. It has worked very well. Only thing is that I wish I had installed a 1500W unit instead as the one I used cycles on and off more often than I'd like. It still makes some noise but is waay quieter than the furnace and we can sleep at night. This is my favorite mod. I've done to our TT.

I guess if you get charged a high rate at a c/g, propane may be a better option. At least on electric though, you never need to worry about draining the tanks dry when you least want it to happen and you don't have to drive around lokking for a place for a fill, esp. if it's dark and/or cold out.

If you wanted to retrofit with a heater(s) installed in the ceiling, your camper would have to have fiberglass insulation to be able to fish wires in.

If you have a 30 amp service, you are pretty much restricted to using a max. 1500 watt heater so that you can still use other things. If you have a 50 amp service you can install more or higher wattage heaters. In a larger camper with several rooms and a 50 amp service, you'd want an electric in each divided space.

I think if you want to use an elctric heater(s) in cold weather, unless you have a well-insulated or 4-season camper with more/better insulation, you won't get enough heat out of an electric heater. But I doubt you would remove the furnace, as it'd still be there for the times when it gets cold and you need more heat.

Radiant heaters heat people and objects and not air. They are in the order of only 10% more efficient than space heaters. I don't see them working well in an RV since the ceilings are too low. You'll often see these heaters in warehouses and shops with high ceilings and in spots where people work a lot in the same location like at a counter or workbench.

I don't see how electric radiant heating cables would would in an RV. These normally need to be installed in a mortar bed. I'm not aware of any electric ones that work on or below a wood subfloor unless there's something new out there.

If you are using plug-in portable heaters, especially ceramic types, you need to be careful where you place them so as not to potentially cause a fire. The oil-filled heaters are quite safe but bulky. There is a retrofit kit available to attach to a furnce, but is very expensive and from what I read elsewhere, it's questionable if you'd reach a payback point to cover the approx. installation cost of $1500. Plus the kit is not a DIY install.

And if you are going to use portable plug-in heaters you need to be careful of what recept. you plug it in to, that there are no "dysfunctional" wiring connections at the recept. you are plugging into or downstream recepts., and never hide the cords under carpeting, dog beds etc. as the cords can overheat. It's also not good to let the heaters run non-stop as they aren't normally designed for 100% duty cycle. You can find posts/threads on this forum on all this.

What I think would be cool is an underfloor hot water radiant heating system like used in homes (we have it). This would be a serious retrofit though, if even possible at all, plus you'd need space for a boiler of some sort, circ. pump(s), valves, etc.

Anyway, that's my 2 cents for the last day of 2012.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	2050_1231Craigslist0368.jpg
Views:	60
Size:	49.6 KB
ID:	22614  
__________________
Gil & Deb & Dougal the Springer Spaniel
Langley, BC
myredracer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2012, 01:23 PM   #28
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Milford, MA
Posts: 441
Quote:
Originally Posted by myredracer View Post

I don't see how electric radiant heating cables would would in an RV. These need to be installed in a mortar bed. I'm not aware of any electric ones that work on or below a wood subfloor.
The technology has advanced over the past few years. They can be done easily and without a mortar bed. The brand I referenced in my original reply is just one option.
Laminate Floor Heating - ThermoSoft

Incidentally, thermosoft makes many of the heated mattress elements in RV use and it is based upon the same principle as their ready to install radiant floor pads.
__________________
2011 A-122
rawlus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2012, 01:33 PM   #29
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Langley, BC
Posts: 582
rawlus, that's good to know. Are there limitations on it's use? Can laminate be plastic type I wonder or the normal type? Will read up on the link.

Electric radiant floor heating would be great in an RV. Nothing nicer than toasty warm toes in the morning. I know from experience though that you have to be careful not to place things on it that act like insulation like thick floor mats and dog beds as you can cause localized overheating.
__________________
Gil & Deb & Dougal the Springer Spaniel
Langley, BC
myredracer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2012, 01:37 PM   #30
Graduate Member
 
RoadTrip's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Columbia, MO
Posts: 508
Quote:
Originally Posted by whj77372 View Post
Two heaters of the type you use will not keep my 5er at a toasty temp all night in 30 degree weather.

We try to keep ahead of the weather and not be any place that is going to be cold.
I keep trying to get my inlaws to move to Florida, so we can visit a warmer climate - but I guess in the meantime I'll just have to deal with these Missouri winters. Could be worse I guess- could live farther north where winter accounts for 1 of 2 seasons...

I think I'm just resigned to two heaters to help the furnace. Still better than no heaters to help the furnace!
__________________

__________________
--2009 Sunseeker 2860DS (Class C)
- one Hotwife, and two boys under 2(with one on the way!)
2013 - 53 days
2012 - 26 days

RoadTrip is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:56 AM.