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Old 09-15-2015, 02:01 PM   #21
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This is interesting the manufacturers are not calling it "dry weight" any longer ???? It is now called "UVW (Unloaded Vehicle Weight)* For my unit I noticed this year it is heavier than dry weight for my year brochure the "UVW" is more (or heavier). I know there can be other manufacturing reasons for that also.

This will make thing even more confusing than they were ...... Interesting the old Dry Weight does not include propane but the new "UVW" does include propane........


We don't want to create a standard do we.... LOL
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Old 09-15-2015, 02:04 PM   #22
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Some manufacturers publish dry weights on the yellow sticker and some do not. Been like that for years. I conclude that there is no standard or requirement to provide that information. It's basically irrelevant anyway, as mentioned earlier. The GVWR is the key one to consider when thinking about TV limits.
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Old 09-15-2015, 06:21 PM   #23
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Yellow sticker and tire load rating verbiage

For reference, here's the yellow sticker on my 2015 Rockwood 2604WS trailer, also the tire rating verbiage on the sidewall of my blown Constancy LY188 205/75R14 LRC tire. There is no sticker showing GVWR that I can find.

The sum of dry weight (5995lbs) and cargo (1660lbs) equals 7655lbs.
The load rating of the tire (1760lbs) times 4 equals 7040lbs.
The RV industry argument will be that this is ok because the weight on the tires is reduced by the tongue weight.
My argument is that this is cutting it too close when the lives of my family are on the line.
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Old 09-15-2015, 07:21 PM   #24
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My argument is that this is cutting it too close when the lives of my family are on the line.
That's why a lot of us go up a load range before or shortly after leaving the lot.
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Old 09-15-2015, 07:38 PM   #25
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That's why a lot of us go up a load range before or shortly after leaving the lot.
Yeah. As a newbie, I naively thought I could trust Forest River to put adequate tires on my vehicle. Now I've learned the hard way and am also upgrading my tires.

Something's wrong with this picture. The consensus appears to be that tires on new trailers are problematic. Why do we continue to put up with this and pay extra to put a new set of tires on a new vehicle? If this were a Honda Accord, there would be headlines about a massive recall.
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Old 09-15-2015, 07:50 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Gyrogearloose View Post
For reference, here's the yellow sticker on my 2015 Rockwood 2604WS trailer, also the tire rating verbiage on the sidewall of my blown Constancy LY188 205/75R14 LRC tire. There is no sticker showing GVWR that I can find.

The sum of dry weight (5995lbs) and cargo (1660lbs) equals 7655lbs.
The load rating of the tire (1760lbs) times 4 equals 7040lbs.
The RV industry argument will be that this is ok because the weight on the tires is reduced by the tongue weight.
My argument is that this is cutting it too close when the lives of my family are on the line.

Thanks. The yellow sticker is just extra information. All trailers are suppose to have a plate or sticker attached to the driver side near the front outside of the RV. That is the "tire placard" mandated by DOT and should have tire size, inflation and GAWR information on it. If there is no placard the Rv is not in compliance with Federal Requirements.

RE failed tire.
IMO you suffered a "Run Low Flex Failure" based on the evidence I see in the picture of the condition and marks on the sidewall. This type of failure can happen in 4 to 10 miles at highway speed when the tire is actively leaking and has lost a majority of its proper inflation.

I have a number of autopsies with pictures showing this on my blog.
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Old 09-15-2015, 08:17 PM   #27
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I checked tire pressure in the morning before this failure. All tires were in the range of 48 to 52 lbs. I also eyeballed the tires at each stop before the failure and saw nothing to worry about. There were no significant events that I noticed prior to the failure, but it's always possible that I picked up a nail or similar while driving. This seems like a stretch, though. For the future, I bought an aftermarket TPMS and should know when a tire has a problem before it gets to this state.



I've been looking for a tire rating plate and not found it. On the 2014 model at the dealership it was next to the rear door on the passenger side. I remember because I was surprised at the very low cargo capacity (that has now been significantly increased). Next time I'm over at the storage facility I'll look for it at the driver side front, although I think I would have noticed it if it were there. Actually, maybe I'll drive over now and look again......
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Old 09-15-2015, 09:24 PM   #28
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There's a disease, more common among men than women, called 'Refrigerator Blindness'. You open the door to the fridge, look in, and then turn around and call 'Honey, where's the milk?'. When you turn back to the fridge, it has suddenly appeared right in front of you.
I have this disease.

The rating sticker is there on the left side at the front of the trailer, as promised.

This raises a couple of questions:

Why isn't the sum of dry weight plus cargo capacity equal to the GVWR?

Also, I have a 36 gallon water tank and a hot water heater that's likely to contain 6 gallons. So isn't the total weight of water likely to be more like 350lbs than 250lbs?
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Old 09-15-2015, 09:33 PM   #29
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IMO you suffered a "Run Low Flex Failure" based on the evidence I see in the picture of the condition and marks on the sidewall. This type of failure can happen in 4 to 10 miles at highway speed when the tire is actively leaking and has lost a majority of its proper inflation.

I have a number of autopsies with pictures showing this on my blog.
I certainly did drive on it for a while before I discovered it.

Here's the exact scenario:
-Morning before leaving I checked all tire pressures. They seemed fine.
-We stopped for lunch in Gunnison CO. At that time I walked around the truck and trailer and eyeballed the tires. Nothing stood out.
-We then drove over Monarch Pass. This is a nasty, steep, windy mountain road. Lots of elevation gain and then loss, windy, and steep. No guardrail, no breakdown lane, and a cliff if you go off the road. I drove conservatively.
-My 2015 F-150 has a tow/haul mode. It does a nice job of downshifting to help out when going downhill. I spent much of the downhill portion in second gear, so I didn't need to ride the truck and trailer brakes hard.
-We then stopped at a gas station in Buena Vista CO where we discovered the tire had been shredded.

I don't recall any impacts or hazards that might have damaged the tire.

I really don't know exactly where it went flat. Nor do I know whether it was sudden or gradual.
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Old 09-16-2015, 01:09 PM   #30
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If you ask FR about why they put on the tires they do, they will tell you that the sum of the tire max load ratings is sufficient to carry the maximum weight that will be put on the axles (GVWR - pin or tongue weight). They do not make any allowance about how close the two numbers are together (i.e. you are at 98% of the tire max load rating when doing so). Since the tire's manufacturer has certified that the tires will run for extended periods at that weight and inflation, they take them at their word and do not believe they need to put on tires where there would be a significant 'unused' portion of the load rating.

Same for the axles... why you see axles where the sum of the load ratings is below GVWR: because the frame is the weak link. And so on.

Using components that are over-built would make the product more expensive and reduce its marketability. Only when customers demand (and are willing to pay for) the higher spec components will a manufacturer offer them, let alone make them standard equipment. There are some higher-end models where that is the case but the lower end is seen as too price-sensitive.

Of course there are many of us that don't believe that, especially in a component that has the crucial job of connecting the trailer to the road and handling all the insults that the road can throw at them.

Why doesn't this happen with cars? I think you'll find that the sum of the load ratings of the tires is significantly under GVWR of a passenger car (like 50%). There are very few passenger vehicles that have GVWRs in the 8000# to 10000# range.

As to why your tire failed, I agree it was probably due to loss of pressure seeing the sidewall cracking. Since its much harder to notice a trailer flat than a TV flat, a trailer flat usually gets so destroyed by the time you notice it that you couldn't see that.

Very common to get objects in the second tire to run over an object - the first tire just seems to set it up (e.g. flips the nail or screw from being flat on the road to being vertical where it can now puncture the tread of the second tire to run over). I think almost every puncture I've had has been on the rear axle (I just had a screw removed from a rear tire 2 days ago that I must have picked up in Michigan).
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