Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-16-2016, 08:55 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
dwhit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Chicago, Rochester now GA/SC at Lake Hartwell
Posts: 159
Grease seal failure coated brake shoes

I've a 2014 XLR 415amp I purchased used last year. I'm taking it to Colorado so I want the brakes to be in good shape. The first wheel I removed the rear seal allowed grease to foul the shoes. I see from the archives this is a known problem. I'll replace the seal with a recommended NAPA part but the shoes...are they recoverable? They're only available from Dexter?
__________________

__________________
XLR 415AMP, F350 Lariat 6.7 DRW, three bikes, NRA Benefactors.
Traveling 7 months/year
dwhit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2016, 08:59 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 100
People will disagree with me, but use hot water/ degreaser / pressure washer, then go over them thoroughly with brake cleaner and a rag and they will be fine.

Sent from my SM-N920V using Tapatalk
__________________

__________________
mustardbucket107 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2016, 09:06 PM   #3
2007 WildCat 32QBBS
 
05CrewDually's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: NJ
Posts: 1,757
Quote:
Originally Posted by mustardbucket107 View Post
People will disagree with me, but use hot water/ degreaser / pressure washer, then go over them thoroughly with brake cleaner and a rag and they will be fine.

Sent from my SM-N920V using Tapatalk
I don't disagree. What I do is this.

1. Wipe as much grease you can off the shoes first.
2. Use brake cleaner and spray the shoes along with wiping.
3. Allow to dry, or blow dry with shop air.
4. Using a heat gun (hair dryer) heat the shoe friction material and watch for the oils to "sweat" out.
5. Blot with a rag and continue until no more.
6. Finish up with another wipe with brake cleaner and a blow dry.

Note: instead of a hot air gun I've used a portable MAP gas torch but I don't recommend for the novice especially when you're using brake clean around. Most brake cleans are flammable.
__________________
*Current: 2005 Ford F350 Crew Cab Dually 6.0 diesel 4x4*
*Retired: 1987 F350 Crew Cab Dually 6.9 turbo diesel
2007 Forest River WildCat 32QBBS
05CrewDually is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2016, 07:57 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
dwhit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Chicago, Rochester now GA/SC at Lake Hartwell
Posts: 159
Thanks very much gentlemen...I'll do these procedures and hope for the best!
__________________
XLR 415AMP, F350 Lariat 6.7 DRW, three bikes, NRA Benefactors.
Traveling 7 months/year
dwhit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2016, 08:13 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
rattleNsmoke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Western Connecticut
Posts: 1,571
For the cheap cost of an entire brake shoe 'kit' including new springs, shoes, adjuster and hardware, I personally would not waste my time trying to recover oil soaked brake shoes. Conversely, if the shoes were only slightly contaminated there may be hope. You have to run to NAPA anyway, price out a new kit.
__________________
2010 Cedar Creek 5th Wheel 34SATS "The Beast"
2006 Ford F350 Lariat 6.0L Diesel
2003 Harley Heritage Softail "Hogzilla"
1986 Marriage to "Wifey" (patience of a saint)
rattleNsmoke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2016, 08:51 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Restcure's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 871
A note on what may have caused the seal to fail in the first place...

I've heard that packing bearings through an EZ lube axle can have that effect unless the wheel is spun periodically. When I repack with EZ lube it's 4 pumps, 4 spins and repeat until the grease coming out is all clean.

Having something to spin continuously spin the wheel FOR me would be super helpful... still pondering that!
__________________
2012 Rockwood Ultra-Lite 2701SS, Goodyear Endurance LRD, ProPride 3P 1400 hitch
2013 F-150 FX4 7700# GVWR SuperCrew 3.5L EcoBoost 157" WB Max Tow 3.73:1
John, Dawn and Emily... and Bella the camping kitty

visit our website at www.restcure.ca
Restcure is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2016, 09:31 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
SKnight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,428
Quote:
Originally Posted by mustardbucket107 View Post
People will disagree with me, but use hot water/ degreaser / pressure washer, then go over them thoroughly with brake cleaner and a rag and they will be fine.

Sent from my SM-N920V using Tapatalk
And scuff the surface of the friction material with rough sandpaper. The first few times you get them hot there might be smoke and a little smell but that should go away.
__________________
Now-2014 Sierra 346RETS 5er BUB
Then-2002 Keystone Springdale 286RLDS TT

Nights camped in 2014-28, 2015-127, 2016-10
SKnight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2016, 01:20 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: White Rock BC
Posts: 258
Quote:
Originally Posted by rattleNsmoke View Post
For the cheap cost of an entire brake shoe 'kit' including new springs, shoes, adjuster and hardware, I personally would not waste my time trying to recover oil soaked brake shoes. Conversely, if the shoes were only slightly contaminated there may be hope. You have to run to NAPA anyway, price out a new kit.
You can buy a complete bolt on "fully loaded" backing plate from Etrailer.com for under $50.00. Cut and reconnect two wires and it is literally a 1/2 hour job. My experience with oiled brake shoes is the first time they get over heated a bit, the oil comes to the surface again.
__________________
Floyd & Carolyn
2012 F150 S/crew 4X4 6.2L 6Spd Tow Max Firestone airbags.
2011 28RKS Wildcat. Yamaha 3000iseb Generator.
2013 22 nights.2014 57 nights.2015 116 nights
2016. 96 nights 2017 72 nights
Filterman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2016, 05:46 PM   #9
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Near Kingston
Posts: 16
Exclamation Contaminated Brake Shes

If oil or grease gets on brake shoes they are ruined. Washing them with anything will cause the oil to soak into the lining even more. When the brakes are applied the shoes will heat and become more aggressive and cause that wheel to brake more than the others. This will cause more wear on that tire as well as uneven braking over the system. Do not fool with the brake coefficient, do a proper job and change them when you have them apart. Safety is more important than a few dollars for new brakes. I spent many years as a certified truck tech and also taught brake systems in a College so have seen the tests to prove that brakes with oil or grease on them are to be replaced. Your brake drum may also be glazed from the oil and heating so it may also need replacing.
__________________
John and Julie Parish
Lansdowne, Ontario, Canada
2015 Ford F250 Diesel
2009 Cedar Creek 34RLSA
Retired but still working sometimes to pay for toys
jdp105 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2016, 05:52 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 386
Same thing happened to me on my 14 work n play . Only had towed it home from the dealer. Ended up buy complete brakes with backer plates and magnets threw Etrailer.com. Use a good degreaser and angle grinder with a wire wheel to clean the hubs up.
__________________

__________________
Big Red and 30WR is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
brakes

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:26 PM.