Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-31-2015, 10:02 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 3,155
Dennis Kirk has a series of videos that shows what I consider the best way. Most people overdo it. I use a Condor and don't have it fastened to the floor. Straps near the floor do little. I dont use ratchet straps, nor do I compress the forks more tgan half way. I do secure the hooks so they won't slip off.
__________________

__________________
WolfWhistle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2015, 10:52 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Fulltimers
Posts: 234
I just wanted to add my experience in hauling a 750 lb bike about 8,000 miles in a toy hauler.


You will eventually hit a bump big enough to partially or totally dislodge the bike no matter how tight you crank the straps. Of course, tightening the straps that tight isn't good for the bike either! After the first time my bike came partially loose, I started using these screw on clamps and never had a problem again. In fact, I didn't have to over-tighten the tie downs either. I thread this clamp through the round steel ring of the strap (see arrow) and through the floor tie-down loop. Walla -- a strap can no longer come off the tie-down loop.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Capture.JPG
Views:	126
Size:	19.6 KB
ID:	72693  
Attached Images
 
__________________

__________________
F-350 Dually
Cedar Creek Silverback
Mazda Miata TOAD for sex appeal
danno2u is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2015, 06:38 AM   #13
Member
 
Tx_Rider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 65
I got the Bolt it on system for mine. Haven't used it yet but it seemed like a good option since I did not want to bolt anything to the floor.

__________________
2015 Thunderbolt XLR 340X12HP
2011 Ford F250, 6.7, CC, SB with B&W Companion Slider

US Army Retired
Tx_Rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2015, 08:19 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 3,155
Quote:
Originally Posted by danno2u View Post
I just wanted to add my experience in hauling a 750 lb bike about 8,000 miles in a toy hauler.

You will eventually hit a bump big enough to partially or totally dislodge the bike no matter how tight you crank the straps. Of course, tightening the straps that tight isn't good for the bike either! After the first time my bike came partially loose, I started using these screw on clamps and never had a problem again. In fact, I didn't have to over-tighten the tie downs either. I thread this clamp through the round steel ring of the strap (see arrow) and through the floor tie-down loop. Walla -- a strap can no longer come off the tie-down loop.
Excellent idea and tip Danno.

I run my straps very loose (compared to some), but know the hooks, without some kind of assistance will unhook on a big enough bump. I have used my method for many years on every bike I have hauled for many years; from small to large without incident, in probably a dozens trailers or trucks. All the straps are designed to do it to keep the bike vertical; the bike's suspension if allowed to move, keeps her planted and keeps tires from leaving the "ground"; if she does bottom out, it handles it just like when you are riding; no harm no foul.

To keep hooks from coming off, I rely on using the bitter end (the excess) of the straps to prevent hooks from coming off, but I am going to look into using these "quick links" or "removable links" on my straps.

On my latest setup I hit a big enough whoopdee to cause the axle to hit the frame (whole other story), so I know it works. However, until I ran a strap side to side and around the tire THREE (3) times, the back tire moved sideways; sometimes none at all, but one time a lot; which made getting her out of the Condor a royal PITA. Thats one strap, three times around the tire.

I know the side to side strap should not be pulling back on the bike, but it does a little; to pull it forward I would need to add 2 more tie points, which I probably won't do.

Thanks for the tip.
__________________
WolfWhistle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2015, 12:25 AM   #15
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 17
Bagger tie down

Quote:
Originally Posted by RVBikers View Post
Thanks Steve. Yeah, hidden is the same wheel chock. Its there, just hidden by the box of cardboard for fire strarter.
Being a bagger, makes it a little tough to get good tie down spots.
Harley sells chrome tie down braces that go on the front forks. You have to be careful putting the straps on the handle bars or light bar. They can be damaged if you hit some big bumps. Bolt-it-On makes a great product for securing the front tire. For the back, take a couple of ratchet straps and loop them around the wheel and tie off on the floor tie downs. Works great and the bike won't move. Seriously look into the front braces. They could saw you from pulling you're handle bars down.
__________________
msrafd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2015, 03:11 PM   #16
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 49
Tying down motorcycle

Before the a Biker Bars, to keep the rear from bouncing and moving side to side, I use a strip of Etrack. The two cleats and short bungee wrapped around the wheel keeps it from going anywhere. Cleats and bungee not shown in this pic.Click image for larger version

Name:	ImageUploadedByTapatalk1428001884.802936.jpg
Views:	158
Size:	355.2 KB
ID:	72850
__________________
Krawler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2015, 07:12 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 3,155
I couldn't think of the handlebar strap I use, its Canyon Dancer. It slips over both grips and has loops to attach straps to. The leverage and control the straps have way up and at the end of the bars, is incredible; you simply don't have to strap down too tightly. The straps are only there to keep the bike upright and pulled forward. I do strap the back since the backend does move sideways. IMO, any bump capable of bending my bars would probably damage to the floor mounted setup as well. Can you imagine the stress load placed on the Biker Bar; mounted below the frame and with 1000# sitting that high above it, hanking and pulling. You better darn sure have it bolted down well. The biker bar will not work on all bikes, either. Of course, neither will Canyon Dancer. Ask 20 people and get 20 answers how to tie down a bike. Only things more controversial is brand or tires, brand of bike, brand truck, religion and politics. But, not necessarily in that order.
__________________
WolfWhistle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2015, 03:09 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
chpence1's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 149
I will say, you cannot use velcro. ....
__________________
2005 Dodge Ram Laramie, SRW
5.9L Cummins Turbo Diesel 24 valve
2013 Forest River Thunderbolt XLR 380 AMP
Cow Bell
2010 Star Motorcycle Stratoliner Deluxe
chpence1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2015, 04:02 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
Taranwanderer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: NEPA
Posts: 1,446
Krawler and I have done it the same way for a while now with good results. I am digging the Biker Bar and will be springing for one soon...😈
__________________
2015 XLR Hyperlite 30HFS5 (mods being performed regularly)
2009 Salem LA 292fkds (gone)
Nights- ('12)23 ('13)23 ('14)15 ('15)31 ('16)27 ('17) 20
2016 Ford Fusion Titanium (gulping gas again, camping support vehicle)
2014 Harley Davidson FLHX (XLR cargo)
2011 Ram 2500 CC 4X4 CTD, B&W Companion (toy hauler hauler)
Taranwanderer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2015, 01:11 PM   #20
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Michigan
Posts: 76
Ouch

Can't really tell whats holding the front tire but those straps will rub the paint off of the front pods. The best solution is always one of the simpler ones described by several people here. I have the chrome tie down brackets the Harley sells, $59.99, 93500011 or 06 depending on year. Best solution ever, it gets the straps away from painted bits and gives a secure tie down location. All other locations (handle bars, crash bars (never) and front axles) all have their short comings or destroy the motorcycle. Lock the front tire in a good wheel chock and strap through a Harley tie down bracket, if the chock is good you don't need to crank that hard. Tens of thousands of miles, no trouble. With the rear d-rings available just put one ratchet strap through the tire and cross it over to the d-rings. With the rubber floor and tire the rear won't move. Check the set up at every stop. Things loosen up.
__________________

__________________
rocrider50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:25 AM.