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Old 07-09-2014, 07:08 PM   #21
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I have another tire question. All these blowout and such has got me worried. The tires I have are Road Masters ST. Any good or should I think of replacing them? They have about 5 thousand mies on them. Thoughts?
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Old 07-09-2014, 08:06 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Salmon Hunter View Post
I have another tire question. All these blowout and such has got me worried. The tires I have are Road Masters ST. Any good or should I think of replacing them? They have about 5 thousand mies on them. Thoughts?
I see you have the same year and model Crusader as mine. Most of the posts here deal with the Chinese made tires which fall under a whole slew of different brand names,but are in fact made by just a handful or less companies located in China. It is only MY opinion,but based on my experience and that of many seasoned RVers here,I would look at changing them sooner than later. It seems that time is SOMETIMES more than miles,a contributing factor in the failure of these tires. Mine had about 3 years and 10-12k and BAM! and had great tread left on them. They were kept covered and run at 80psi....always!!
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Old 07-09-2014, 08:46 PM   #23
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So I guess it is time for some new tires. The damage from the blow could be more that the cost of the new tires.
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Old 07-09-2014, 09:23 PM   #24
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Kind of an interesting article I came across which helped me feel better about the tire direction I was heading.

The debate between ST vs. LT tire choice on a trailer.

Here is the info a guy compiled from the government site on tire testing....

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS & CONCLUSIONS

I found the testing requirements for both the ST and LT tires at the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) webpage.

The testing for each tire is comprised of (1) bead unseating resistance, (2) strength, (3) endurance, and (4) high speed performance.

The testing for (1) bead unseating resistance and (2) strength were identical for tires representative of moderate to heavy 5th wheels and thus no advantage is given to either tire type.

The testing for (3) endurance was found to be significantly different between the ST and LT tires.

Both the ST and LT are put through the same initial pressure, time and load profile. The total profile lasts 34 hours of continuous run time starting at 85% of rated load and ending at 100% of rated load. To further stress the tires, a load range E tire (nominal 80 psi rating) is tested at a reduced pressure of 60 psi to induce additional load on the tire during testing. (This is reasonable that testing should be conservative.)

But now the endurance testing diverges significantly.

The ST tire is tested at this pressure, time and load profile at 50 mph. After that, the ST test is over.

The LT tire is tested at this pressure, time and load profile at 75 mph. This is a 50% increase over the ST and will induce significant additional load and heating on the tire during testing. After that, the LT test is not complete. Next a “Low Inflation Pressure Performance” test is performed for the LT tire only. The tire pressure is decreased to 46 psi and the tire is immediately run for an additional 2 hours at 75 mph and 100% of rated load.

Thus, the LT tire endurance test is drastically more intense than the ST endurance test.

The testing for (4) high speed performance.

The difference in high speed performance testing between a ST and LT tire is significant. Both tires are tested through a 90 minute speed/time profile.

The ST tire is tested 88% of rated load while the LT tire is tested at 85% of rated load. Thus, the loading is 3% higher based on rated load and this slight advantage goes to the ST tire.

However, the LT tire is tested at significantly higher velocities when compared to a ST tire (99 vs. 85 mph maximum speed). This is a 16% advantage to the LT tire.

Thus, again the overall test for the LT is more rigorous than the ST test.

Conclusion:

It is reasonable to conclude that these test requirements force the tire manufacturer to construct an LT tire more substantially than an ST tire. This is also a reasonable explanation for the same size LT tire is rated at a slightly lower maximum load than a ST tire.

And now, for those of you who need to know all the details, read on!

REFERENCES

The references for my evaluation may be found at the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) webpage:
ST tire standard may be found at FMCSA Part 571, subsection 109.
http://www.fmcsa.dot...90163348008f295
LT tire standard may be found at FMCSA Part 571, subsection 139.
http://www.fmcsa.dot...90163348008f2a9
Part 571, subsection 139 references Part 571 subsection 119 which can be found at:
http://www.fmcsa.dot...90163348008f29d

QUICK NOTES

Each standard for the ST and LT tires has definitions, significant constraints on labeling, etc. that I will not address. There are also tire conditioning (temperature), tire break in, etc. that are the same or similar for ST and LT that I will not address. The details are in the references.

The (3) endurance, and (4) high speed performance tests must not result in tire failure. Tire failure includes visual evidence of tread, sidewall, ply, cord, inner liner, or bead separation, chunking, broken cords, cracking, or open splices, not just a blowout.

TESTING - BEAD UNSEATING RESISTANCE

ST Tire: (reference paragraph S5.2.2)

The tire is mounted horizontally and a vertical load is applied to the tire’s outer sidewall at a rate of 50 mm (2 inches) per minute.

Increase the load until the bead unseats or a specified value is reached.

Repeat the test at least four places equally spaced around the tire circumference.

LT Tire:

Paragraph “S6.6 Tubeless tire bead unseating resistance” references the ST tire procedure noted above.

Conclusion:

The testing for bead unseating resistance is identical for a ST and LT tire.

TESTING - STRENGTH

ST Tire: (reference paragraph S5.3.2.1)

Force a 19 mm (3?4 inch) diameter cylindrical steel plunger with a hemispherical end perpendicularly into the tread rib as near to the centerline as possible, avoiding penetration into the tread groove, at the rate of 50 mm (2 inches) per minute.

Compute the breaking energy for each test point by means of a provided formula.

LT Tire: (reference paragraph S6.5.2)

Each tire shall comply with the requirements of S7.3 of 571.119, which is tires for vehicles weighing 10,000 lb or more. Per S7.3 of 571.119 for our example tire, the testing is the same as the ST tire procedure noted above.

Conclusion:

The testing for strength is identical for a ST and LT tire.

TESTING - ENDURANCE

The following is for a ST or LT tire of less than nominal cross section less than or equal to 295 mm (11.5 inches) which is typical of a 5th wheel application.

ST tire: (reference paragraph S5.4.2)

There are specifications for the contact of the tire mounted on a test axle and steel test wheel after the test that I will not address because they are similar for the ST and LT.

Inflate a load range E to 60 psi. (410 kPa)

Conduct the test at 80 kilometers per hour (km/h)(50 miles per hour) in accordance with the following schedule without pressure adjustment or other interruptions:

The loads for the following periods are the specified percentage of the maximum load rating marked on the tire sidewall:
Time and Percent of rated load
4 hours, 85%
6 hours, 90%
24 hours, 100%

LT Tire: (reference paragraph S6.3.1.2)

“Conduct the test, without interruptions, at the test speed of not less than 120 km/h…” (75 mph)

Inflate a load range E to 60 psi. (410 kPa)

This test uses the same profile as the ST tire.

Immediately following the above sequence perform a Low Inflation Pressure Performance test (reference paragraph S6.4):
This test uses the same tire/wheel as the previous sequence at a reduced pressure.

For a load range E tire the pressure is reduced to 46 psi. (320 kPa)

The same tire/wheel is run an additional 2 hours at the reduced pressure at a speed of 75 mph and 100% of rated load.

Conclusion:

The difference in endurance testing between a ST and LT tire is significant. Both tires are tested through a equivalent loading/time profile. However, the LT tire is tested at this profile at a higher speed (75 vs. 50 mph) and must still endure an additional 2 hour low pressure test without failure. Thus the overall test for the LT is far more rigorous than the ST test.

TESTING - HIGH SPEED PERFORMANCE

ST tire: (reference paragraph S5.5.4)

Load the tire to 88 percent of the tire’s maximum load rating as marked on the tire sidewall. Inflate to 72 psi (500 kPa). Run the test sequentially without interruption at:
75 mph (121 km/h) for 30 minutes
80 mph (129 km/h) for 30 minutes
85 mph (137 km/h) for 30 minutes

LT Tire: (reference paragraph S6.2.1.2.7)

Load the tire to 85 percent of the tire’s maximum load rating as marked on the tire sidewall. Inflate to 72 psi (500 kPa). Run the test sequentially without interruption at:
87 mph (140 km/h) for 30 minutes
93 mph (150 km/h) for 30 minutes
99 mph (160 km/h) for 30 minutes

Conclusion:

The difference in high speed performance testing between a ST and LT tire is significant. Both tires are tested through a speed/time profile. The ST tire is tested 88% of rated load while the LT tire is tested at 85% of rated load. Thus, the loading is 3% higher based on rated load and this slight advantage goes to the ST tire. However, the LT tire is tested at significantly higher velocities (nearly 100 mph!) when compared to a ST tire. This is a 16% advantage to the LT tire. Thus, again the overall test for the LT is more rigorous than the ST test.
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Old 07-10-2014, 10:01 AM   #25
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Thanks! That took a lot of work to post. I wonder what Tireman9 will say...
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Old 07-10-2014, 10:20 AM   #26
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That report kinda makes the 'squirm' on turns argument go away - as I already had known as I had already seen a similar report.

I'm already looking for new tires and we haven't even taken possession of our new 325RES.

Thanks for the very long ST vs LT post.
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Old 07-10-2014, 01:27 PM   #27
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Blowout! 320 Crusader!

Need help Please with tire purchase.
After all this discussion of blowout, I decided to look at my DOT date of MFG. Low and behold they are 2004 as best as I can tell.
I am second or third owner, and I recently purchased the TT privately. It's a 2004 FR FLAGSTAFF 26BHSS. So one would think they are original tires. Ten years old. I agree with conventional wisdom is five year max. Regardless of how good they look.They look amazing. Tread, no bulges or bubbles etc. After reading all the recent discussion etc re: age of tire, I am ready to purchase.
I went to my local Good Year dealer for four new Marathons this morning. Here's the puzzle.... My tire size on the build sticker attached to the TT states 205 75 15. However the tire that are on are Carlisle showing 215 75 15. Can anyone venture a guess why a different size and is of the same year of TT manufacture. Final Question, the one that really has me wondering what to do. Should I go with the original placard stated size of 205 etc or replace what is on there 215 etc. good year guy did not have Carlisle, but I was sold on GY Marathons from what I've read here. Thanks in advance for the help. This forum is amazing, I've learned so much as a newbie, just listening.


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Old 07-10-2014, 02:11 PM   #28
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I feel your pain. Or should I say I've felt your pain. 4 blowouts on 2 travel 5ers and one caught just in time. $5000 total in damage, worst was over $3000. ALL were Trail Express maintained at max pressure. E-s were at 80 and C was at 50 psi.
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Old 07-10-2014, 02:26 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by Salmon Hunter View Post
So I guess it is time for some new tires. The damage from the blow could be more that the cost of the new tires.
Salmon I just replaced yesterday with GY Marathons, Carlisle were available
slightly more money actually . I had 4k km on them in year and the bead was rotten inside the one tire that leaked and another was on the way out. Trail Distress for sure as some have coined. Saw some recent blowouts that tore up a trailer pretty good.
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Old 07-10-2014, 02:29 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dcheatwood View Post
I feel your pain. Or should I say I've felt your pain. 4 blowouts on 2 travel 5ers and one caught just in time. $5000 total in damage, worst was over $3000. ALL were Trail Express maintained at max pressure. E-s were at 80 and C was at 50 psi.
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This is why I replaced yesterday! worth the $770.00 for piece of mind! What pressure are your new GY running at Dcheatwood?
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