Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-24-2011, 11:38 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
grhodes50's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Eastern Oklahoma, USA
Posts: 2,613
Sanibel Construction

I found these illustrationson on PT's facebook page showing the construction of the new Sanibel 5er's.
Hey RV Guy, are all PT trailers constructed the same way?
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Sanibel Floor Construction.jpg
Views:	147
Size:	50.0 KB
ID:	6499   Click image for larger version

Name:	Sanibel Roof Construction.jpg
Views:	150
Size:	43.1 KB
ID:	6500   Click image for larger version

Name:	Sanibel Wall Construction.jpg
Views:	127
Size:	32.6 KB
ID:	6501  
__________________

__________________

Gary & Trish
"PT Crew Member Since 11/2010"
2017 Prime Time Crusader 315RST TE 6.0 : 2007 Flagstaff 206ST MAC Series
2012 F-250 Lariat : FX4 : CC : SB : 6.7L Diesel : 3/55 Gears

2017 Nights Camped - 4
grhodes50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2011, 12:02 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 1,283
The "wood" under the rubber roof in the illustration looks like OSB. I do hope they are not using chipboard in their trailers!

I was also checking out their site, and was under the impression that they used some kind of composite under the fibreglass exterior, but the site said they used wood luan like everyone else. So maybe their insn't anything special about PT?
__________________

__________________
crocus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2011, 12:39 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
grhodes50's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Eastern Oklahoma, USA
Posts: 2,613
That's a good point and one that I'll leave to RV Guy to address since he knows more about the construction details than I do.

I know that compared to the trailers I've owned in the past, this one feels alot more solid. There's really no compairison to how stable the trailer is while set up to camp. The floor is very solid, no soft spots even over the tank locations or heating ducts. The first time I stepped in the trailer I noticed a feeling of a solid, well built trailer and I still get that feeling today. I've read where other PT owners have said the same.
Now none of this is backed by anything. It's just my opinion. If I was to look for a new trailer today, PT would be first on my list.
__________________

Gary & Trish
"PT Crew Member Since 11/2010"
2017 Prime Time Crusader 315RST TE 6.0 : 2007 Flagstaff 206ST MAC Series
2012 F-250 Lariat : FX4 : CC : SB : 6.7L Diesel : 3/55 Gears

2017 Nights Camped - 4
grhodes50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2011, 12:50 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 1,283
I am very glad that you are pleased with your camper. That is all that matters!
We are also happy with our Flagstaff, as it also feels very solid. Before I bought it, I made sure they used plywood under the floor.
But I am sure they could all be better!
__________________
crocus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2011, 01:01 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
grhodes50's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Eastern Oklahoma, USA
Posts: 2,613
I guess were a couple of the "lucky" ones.
I've had the misfortune to owning a trailer that wasn't so good. There are lemons in every batch. The main thing is to keep up the preventive maintenance and also keep an eye out for potential problems. This forum is great for help and advice in those areas.

Good luck and happy camping!
__________________

Gary & Trish
"PT Crew Member Since 11/2010"
2017 Prime Time Crusader 315RST TE 6.0 : 2007 Flagstaff 206ST MAC Series
2012 F-250 Lariat : FX4 : CC : SB : 6.7L Diesel : 3/55 Gears

2017 Nights Camped - 4
grhodes50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2011, 08:39 AM   #6
Commercial Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 580
Gary - These are representations of the Sanibel construction only. There are similar construction features on many of our other brands but the details would take forever to post.

I resisted the temptation to comment further on the other posts

Have a great weekend!

PTM
__________________
RV Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2011, 08:51 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 1,283
RV Guy;
There are two basic questions that I think everyone would like to know.
1) does PT use luan under the fibreglass outer covering?
2) does PT use OSB in the roof or the floor?
Thanks
__________________
crocus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2011, 09:13 AM   #8
Commercial Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 580
Crocus - I'll post directly from our web site and add an editorial. I didn't realize so many people were curious so thanks for asking.

Sidewall Construction
ETERNABOND Construction starts with the 5-layered sidewall standard on all Prime Time products. The frame of the sidewall is created with aircraft quality aluminum tubes that provide for a sidewall that is lightweight yet strong. This advanced framing technique will never rot, warp, deteriorate, mold, or mildew. The aluminum tubes are welded together, not screwed, to ensure a lifetime of structural integrity. The sidewalls are then stuffed with hi density EPS foam that creates a wall with very high insulative properties and sound-deadening qualities. In order to provide a secure anchor-point for interior walls and cabinets, a layer of electrogalvanized sheet metal (EGS) is strategically placed on the interior side of the aluminum and foam wall assembly. On top of the EGS, a layer of plywood decorative board is laminated to the aluminum and foam wall assembly providing a residential look that is extremely resistant to damage and punctures. The exterior layer of the sidewall is formed utilizing a one-piece, Gel Coated fiberglass. The Gel Coated fiberglass looks great, is extremely durable, and is easy to clean. The fifth layer of the sidewall is a plywood panel that is bonded between the fiberglass and the aluminum and foam wall assembly. This additional layer provides increased strength and a smooth exterior appearance.
An additional benefit to using solid EPS foam in the sidewalls is that it will never settle over time. Fiberglass insulation will often settle or “fall” in the sidewall after exposure to constant transit vibrations. It might be only a couple of inches, but the void created at the top of your wall allows warm air to escape in the winter, cool air to escape in the summer, and extreme condensation inside your unit. ETERNABOND Construction eliminates these voids for long-term thermal efficiency.

Your terminology of "luan" would be correct in our walls.

Floor Construction
Traditional RV floor construction often flexes in the middle of the coach where the holding tanks are located. However, with ETERNABOND Construction, Prime Time has created a 6-layered floor system that is lightweight, yet strong that virtually eliminates the flex commonly found in RV floor construction. Prime Time’s laminated floor system features aircraft quality aluminum tubes welded together and stuffed with hi density EPS foam. For maximum strength and reduced flex, two layers of plywood are bonded on the top of the aluminum and foam floor assembly with seams staggered. On the bottom of the floor a layer of plywood is bonded to the floor assembly which is then bonded to a fifth and final layer of moisture barrier called “Blandex”. Another benefit of ETERNABOND Construction is that the resulting floor is virtually squeak-free.

We do NOT use OSB in the floor construction of Tracer or LaCrosse. On 1 model in Crusader (the 355), we build the same laminated floor, but then we add an additional layer of 5/8" OSB for additonal strength and support. All other Crusaders are built as described above (same as Tracer and LaCrosse).

All of Prime Time's units have a fully walkable 3/8" marine grade OSB roof decking except for our Tracer Micros. We use a laminated roof design on these.

I will add this additional information from our web site that does show that our product is built differently than MOST of our competition:

Endwall Construction
ETERNABOND represents more than just sidewall construction. In order to save money, most manufacturers choose to use non-laminated wood studding in places you might not expect – particularly the end walls. Not at Prime Time! Using the same advanced construction techniques found in our 5-layered sidewall, the end walls of your Prime Time recreational vehicle are built with lightweight, yet strong construction specifications.
Not sure how others might be built? Simply look closely at a rear wall. Is it flat, smooth, and solid to the touch? Then it’s probably built like a Prime Time. Is it wavy, bowed out, and spongy to the touch? Probably not built like a Prime Time.

Slide Out Construction
On a large percentage of Prime Time recreational vehicles, you will find a slide room enhancing the livability and function of the RV. Recognizing that the slide out construction is critical to the long term performance and durability of your RV, ETERNABOND Construction means advanced construction techniques are utilized in the slide rooms, too. All three walls of the slide out are built using our 5-layer, aluminum frame, bonded construction offering lightweight, yet strong construction that also provides excellent insulation and sound deadening properties. A Prime Time RV is unique in that the SLIDE OUT ROOF is aluminum framed and bonded with EPS foam to create a slide out roof strong enough to walk on.

Again, thanks for asking and have a great weekend!
__________________
RV Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2011, 10:18 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 1,283
Thanks for the detailed response.
Unfortunately, PT still uses luan under the fibreglass, the supposed cause of a lot of the delamination issues. When PT first came out, the rumor was that they were using a composite instead of luan, which wouldn't react to any moisture leaks.
PT still looks like a very well-built unit, and I really like the layout of the 290RLT. Saw one at our local RV show, awesome unit!
__________________
crocus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2011, 10:46 AM   #10
Commercial Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 580
You're welcome.

Personally, I think the luan gets a bad name. Without boring you regarding the details, I will say with 100% certainty in my mind that our industry has more lamination problems that are created by composite materials than luan. Every manufacturer who uses something else will obviously tout the advantages of their material but I doubt there are many people who have been directly involved with the manufacture of more laminated units than our Management Team. Almost every MAJOR issue I've encountered has been the direct result of a defective composite material or the reaction of a composite material to heat.

Let the debate begin . . .
__________________

__________________
RV Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:12 AM.