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Old 03-17-2013, 06:24 PM   #1
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Towing some things to consider.

Check it out... interesting article.

Towing? 5 Things to Never Overlook - PickupTrucks.com News
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Old 03-18-2013, 11:01 PM   #2
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Great article.
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Old 03-18-2013, 11:46 PM   #3
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Definitely a great article. It certainly can't hurt to be safe, alert and aware. Let's all keep it safe.
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Old 03-19-2013, 01:00 AM   #4
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Great article but I've got to disagree with one comment made regarding disc brakes. They said in article #2 and I quote, "Hydraulic brakes are used on our trucks because they are powerful, dependable, and create less heat." Actually they create more heat but they do a better job of getting rid of it. We are talking about the laws of physics. "Energy can neither be created nor destroyed merely transformed from one form to another." If you are driving a 20,000 LB. TT and it stops very quickly over and over and over without problems then your brakes are converting the energy of motion into heat energy and getting rid of that heat quickly before it glazes the shoes and warps or creates hard spots on the drums. If you don't create heat you don't stop.
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Old 03-19-2013, 07:20 AM   #5
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Great article but I've got to disagree with one comment made regarding disc brakes. They said in article #2 and I quote, "Hydraulic brakes are used on our trucks because they are powerful, dependable, and create less heat." Actually they create more heat but they do a better job of getting rid of it. We are talking about the laws of physics. "Energy can neither be created nor destroyed merely transformed from one form to another." If you are driving a 20,000 LB. TT and it stops very quickly over and over and over without problems then your brakes are converting the energy of motion into heat energy and getting rid of that heat quickly before it glazes the shoes and warps or creates hard spots on the drums. If you don't create heat you don't stop.
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That would be (Rotors) disc brakes. Youroo!!
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Old 03-19-2013, 08:06 AM   #6
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Agreed, Disc brakes are inherently more efficient. They apply the pressure directly to pads instead of arced shoes to arced drums, there are two sides instead of one and the exposure to the air for the removal of the heat. My comment was in regard to the principal of heat generation. Using either drums or discs the principal of brakes was incorrectly stated.

This is a forum to share opinions, information, experiences and to gain knowledge. When and if that knowledge is incorrect or misleading, if we can, we owe it to the forum members to correct the information.

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Old 03-19-2013, 08:17 AM   #7
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That was a very good article and as always with PTC articles,

The usual bashing at the end of the article made for good reading and laughing with all the trolls.
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Old 03-19-2013, 08:44 AM   #8
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One thing I learned just recently is that trailer balls have a load rating. It makes me wonder how many people out there are towing a trailer well above the ball's capacity. Easy to overlook when your ball is old and dirty and rusty.
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Old 03-19-2013, 09:07 AM   #9
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One thing I learned just recently is that trailer balls have a load rating. It makes me wonder how many people out there are towing a trailer well above the ball's capacity. Easy to overlook when your ball is old and dirty and rusty.
It's always best to keep your keep your trailer balls clean.

Edited: So not to bother those easily offended!
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Old 03-19-2013, 09:13 AM   #10
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Do you use STEEL WOOL to clean 'em ? Sorry I couldn't help myself.
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Old 03-19-2013, 09:16 AM   #11
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Do you use STEEL WOOL to clean 'em ? Sorry I couldn't help myself.
That's a great idea. I usually just use a stiff brush with some degreaser/cleaner.
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Old 03-19-2013, 09:18 AM   #12
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That's a great idea. I usually just use a stiff brush with some degreaser/cleaner.


OUCH !!!
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Old 03-19-2013, 09:29 AM   #13
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Oh my this thread has degraded....

Interesting article.
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Old 03-19-2013, 11:39 AM   #14
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I think we need to get out of the sand box ( myself included) and back on subject.... Article comments.
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Old 03-19-2013, 11:41 AM   #15
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And frog thought I was bad ... u guys should be ashamed of yourselves.
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Old 03-19-2013, 11:49 AM   #16
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And frog thought I was bad ... u guys should be ashamed of yourselves.


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Old 03-19-2013, 12:00 PM   #17
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You guys should really be ashamed of yourselves, back on topic puuuleeeease.
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Old 03-19-2013, 12:00 PM   #18
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Ok- can someone explain to me the part of the article where it talked about the trailers GVWR. I understand that it's typically axle weight plus 20% for tongue weight. But then it started talking something like police only look at axle weights and you could be accountable in case of an accident if you exceed the axle weights (ignoring the GVWR and tongue weight entirely).

Or did I completely misread that?



p.s. nice job self-governing.
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Old 03-19-2013, 01:43 PM   #19
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Know you didn't misread that part. Since in reality the truck does take some of the trailer weight the TT industry uses that fact so they can justify putting smaller axles. How much is born by the truck varies. I've heard anywhere from 10-15% up to 20% and maybe more. Of course that also varies from a TT to a 5-ver and that is called pin-weight. I know for a fact the TT industry does do this. Our Flagstaff is rated at, and I'll round the numbers, 6,000 dry weight, 1,000 lb cargo for a total of 7,000. The TT came with 2-3,000 lb axles. If my tongue weight is say 600-lbs then I'm only over by 400-lbs if I load it to the max. The police are not interested in tongue wrights or pin weights. They are concerned if a TT was carrying more than it was rated for and couldn't stop and that caused or contributed to an accident. They use the axle carrying capacity to determine those loads.

Have you read the other thread concerning cracked frames??? That will open up your eyes concerning who accepts liability. According to the OP his extended warranty covers the frame. FR is putting the responsibility on to Lippert and they are saying know.
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Old 03-19-2013, 02:16 PM   #20
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Interesting - my trailer came with two 7k axles and has a GVWR of something like 15,825. But, if I'm in an accident- the police may consider me overweight if I'm over 14k. Hmm.

We have a week-long trip coming up in a few weeks. It's the first of the season, so I imagine we won't be fully loaded. But- I do plan on weighing on our way out of town to get real numbers (and to try a dose of practicing what I preach!).

That cracked frame thread is heart-wrenching to read.
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