Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-10-2016, 09:34 AM   #11
Rustic Rocks!
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Michigan
Posts: 10
The views about "Boondocking" and or "Dry Camping" will vary from person to person. We have been "Dry Camping", we call it "Rustic" for years. We do not have a generator. Will not own one either. We have a large Deep Cycle Battery and a solar panel. If you manage your power; LED lights, limit pump usage, Camp in the shade so you don't need AC, etc. you will have no issues. We camp generally for 2 week periods without ever needing a generator. Control use of water. We have several 7 gal jugs we carry and fill when near a water source. Limit use of the trailer toilet and sinks to avoid filling the holding tanks. (Wash dishes in tubs that fit in the sink) The best camping is Rustic for us. Larger sites, less noise, more solitude. Don't over think it. Learn to live without the 120V conveniences. Charge your phone in the car. Enjoy!
__________________

__________________
Rustic Bob and Lorie
St. Clair Shores, Michigan
2005 Grand Surveyor GS272
2016 F150
2 Border Collies
1 Frisbee
Rusticbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2016, 11:08 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 4,430
Quote:
Originally Posted by bikendan View Post
Generally:

Dry Camping is camping in developed campgrounds that don't have any hookups.

Boondocking is camping in areas that have no developed sites, such as deserts, BLM land, national or state forests, Walmart and so on.

This is how it's generally defined on most RV forums, that I've been on for the past 12 years.
So I guess the difference is boondocking means no refilling water tanks or dumping grey/black tanks.
__________________

__________________
1988 Coleman Sequoia - popup (1987-2009)
2012 Roo19 - hybid (2012-2015)

2016 Mini Lite 2503S - tt (2015 - ???)
2011 Traverse LT, 3.6L, FWD
2009 Silverado Ext Cab, 5.3L, 4x4, 3.73
2016 Silverado 2500HD Dbl Cab, 6.0L 4x4, 4.10
rockfordroo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2016, 12:29 PM   #13
Moderators' Assistant
 
bikendan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Camano Island, Washington
Posts: 10,728
I think it's more developed vs undeveloped.
For example, California state park campgrounds have less than 1% of their campsites with any hookups.
So you're not in the boondocks but you have nothing to hookup to.
I've also camped in California state forests, where there were no numbered campsites and you simply parked out in the "boonies ".
__________________
Dan-Retired Firefighter/EMT
Shawn-Musician/Entrepreneur/Wine Expert
and Zoe the Wonder Dog(R.I.P.)
'07 Roo 23SS pushing an '07 Chevy Avalanche
Equalizer WDH and Prodigy BC
bikendan is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2016, 05:49 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
Too Tall's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 809
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmbdcj View Post
Wow! Apparently there is a lot of things to consider ( and some math ) when boondocking. I think for the most part I would only be looking for extended weekends to get away however with summer coming on and being in South Florida it may not be in the cards again until next winter when I can go without the a/c.
I really appreciate everyone's comments and thoughts on the topic
IMO, the most important issue is maintaining your batteries, so the more Amp/ hrs you have the more safety factor and longer you can go. There's some very sophistitcated ways to measure charge rate and draw from your battery but for me a $50 DC clip on amp meter (and volts) tells you just about anything you need to know about your battery condition. This is what I do. It's not very high tech but works well.

https://youtu.be/ZWshTRjsqHY
__________________
Rockwood 2104S, 2014 Ram 2500 Diesel.
USMC 68 -70
Too Tall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2016, 06:05 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
ilmor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 738
I boondock at race tracks sometimes alone and sometimes with a friend. I have a small motor home and with it 3 days is the limit on the tanks unless one wants to pay for water and/or sewer service. Of course this is less of an issue with larger rv's.

I'll run the generator now and then (or the chassis engine) to charge the batteries and or run the a/c briefly to cool things a little.
__________________
2017 Forest River Sunseeker 2250SLE
ilmor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2016, 11:26 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
f5moab's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Idaho
Posts: 1,894
Quote:
Originally Posted by bikendan View Post
Generally:

Dry Camping is camping in developed campgrounds that don't have any hookups.

Boondocking is camping in areas that have no developed sites, such as deserts, BLM land, national or state forests, Walmart and so on.

This is how it's generally defined on most RV forums, that I've been on for the past 12 years.



Regular camping w/electrical hookup, but no water or sewer

Shoshone NF


Dry Camping No Hookups (Redfish Lake campground)


Boondocking:
Nothing but what you bring with you...




I can go for 4-5 days when the temps drop down into the 20s with 2-series 27 12V batteries, with all LED lighting. (Of course a lot depends on how warm you want the trailer at night; I prefer it cool.)

Also take along a small Honda generator to re-charge batteries if needed.

Also have a few inverters, and when out driving around, I'll use the TV to charge phones, tablets, etc., using 12 Volt of the built in 120V plug.
__________________
f5moab is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2016, 03:42 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 4,430
Quote:
Originally Posted by f5moab View Post



Regular camping w/electrical hookup, but no water or sewer

Shoshone NF


Dry Camping No Hookups (Redfish Lake campground)


Boondocking:
Nothing but what you bring with you...




I can go for 4-5 days when the temps drop down into the 20s with 2-series 27 12V batteries, with all LED lighting. (Of course a lot depends on how warm you want the trailer at night; I prefer it cool.)

Also take along a small Honda generator to re-charge batteries if needed.

Also have a few inverters, and when out driving around, I'll use the TV to charge phones, tablets, etc., using 12 Volt of the built in 120V plug.

Sorry, but I don't see any difference between your dry camping and boondocking. Both look like you only have what you brought with you, to me.

Only difference I see is your dry camping appears to be in some kind of "prepared campsite" while your boondocking is on some kind of "undeveloped" ground.

If so, then boondocking would seem to be "no hookups and no developed campsite."
__________________
1988 Coleman Sequoia - popup (1987-2009)
2012 Roo19 - hybid (2012-2015)

2016 Mini Lite 2503S - tt (2015 - ???)
2011 Traverse LT, 3.6L, FWD
2009 Silverado Ext Cab, 5.3L, 4x4, 3.73
2016 Silverado 2500HD Dbl Cab, 6.0L 4x4, 4.10
rockfordroo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2016, 04:39 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Too Tall's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 809
Quote:
Originally Posted by f5moab View Post
That campsite is so beautiful, it looks like a painting.
__________________
Rockwood 2104S, 2014 Ram 2500 Diesel.
USMC 68 -70
Too Tall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2016, 06:18 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
f5moab's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Idaho
Posts: 1,894
Quote:
Originally Posted by rockfordroo View Post
Sorry, but I don't see any difference between your dry camping and boondocking. Both look like you only have what you brought with you, to me.

Only difference I see is your dry camping appears to be in some kind of "prepared campsite" while your boondocking is on some kind of "undeveloped" ground.

If so, then boondocking would seem to be "no hookups and no developed campsite."
Did you read the quote that I quoted from bikenden" "Dry Camping is camping in developed campgrounds that don't have any hookups.

Boondocking is camping in areas that have no developed sites, such as deserts, BLM land, national or state forests, Walmart and so on.


So yea, what you imply is correct and I guess the distinction is narrow. However, there is one other major distinction that has not been mentioned. Dry camping is in a developed campground where there were probably 20 or more campsites, and you have to pay to camp.

Boondocking is just that "in the boonies," and there is NO fee to camp (free) and if lucky, no one but coyotes, mountain lions, lizards, etc., withing a mile or two.
__________________
f5moab is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2016, 06:27 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
f5moab's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Idaho
Posts: 1,894
Quote:
Originally Posted by Too Tall View Post
That campsite is so beautiful, it looks like a painting.
Thanks...
Wapiti Campground about 30 miles west of Cody, off Hwy 14. Might be my favorite, but been asked to leave a few times due to grizzly bear activity and the fact I have a soft sided trailer.

Kicked out last year before setup due to a lot of grizzlies hanging around eating choke cherries, they moved me to Rex Hale about 6 miles further west and was assured no grizzly activity. About 3AM the dogs got really antsy and growling, and a lot of shuffling going on outside, so I grabbed the 12 gauge, just in case someone popped in the tent and sat there till the noise went away and the dogs calmed down. Went back to sleep, next AM almost stepped in a grizzly turd about a foot from the bottom of the step.

The North Fork of the Shosone river is behind the campground...
__________________

__________________
f5moab is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:19 PM.