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Old 08-01-2019, 11:10 PM   #1
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Is a Water Filter Really Necessary?

I'm not sure why a water filter is necessary. When getting potable water the source would most likely be municipal water which by law is safe. Even in area where the RV park may be from a well the source still has to be safe to drink by law. So why is a filter a good idea?
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Old 08-01-2019, 11:21 PM   #2
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Old 08-02-2019, 12:05 AM   #3
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In Today's world of finicky water drinkers, I'll bet the overwhelming answer will be Yes.
Many will still drink bottled water, even when they have a water filter.
As a former backpacker, I'm used to drinking water with iodine tablets dissolved in it. So I ain't finicky.
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Old 08-02-2019, 12:09 AM   #4
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I'm not sure why a water filter is necessary. When getting pottable water the source would most likely be municipal water which by law is safe. Even in area where the RV park may be from a well the source still has to be safe to drink by law. So why is a filter a good idea?

Since many/most campgrounds are located in what could be considered rural/country areas, unless its a "down town" cg, ... I would think more are on a well system than not, ... our favorite cg is a Fed. park, with it's own well system, ... it has electrical only at the sites, but has a dump site and also a potable water faucet with a hose to fill the arriving campers fresh tanks, ... it also has about 6-8 roadside faucets around the park, so campers can add more water if necessary, but with these you must use buckets, ... the first time we needed to add to the fresh tank, using our clean white 5 gal. buckets to do so, we saw partials in the bottom of the buckets, ... was either rust from the metal piping or sand from the well, which we would not have seen with a colored bucket, ... thinking the stuff would stop after running the water for a while, it didn't, ... since it would settle to the bottom, we had to settle with stopping short of "bottoms up" when pouring into our fresh tank, ... but since then, I attach our blue Camco filter onto the hose at the potable water station when initially filling the tank when we first get to the cg, ...

you may get reports of, "been camping for 140 yrs., never used a filter, and never had a problem", ... and I suppose that's completely possible, cause rust or sand shouldn't kill you, but that's our experience and why we use a filter, ...
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Old 08-02-2019, 12:33 AM   #5
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Since many/most campgrounds are located in what could be considered rural/country areas, unless its a "down town" cg, ... I would think more are on a well system than not, ... our favorite cg is a Fed. park, with it's own well system, ... it has electrical only at the sites, but has a dump site and also a potable water faucet with a hose to fill the arriving campers fresh tanks, ... it also has about 6-8 water faucets beside the roadway around the park, so campers can add more water if necessary, but these do not have hoses and you can't attach a hose to them, must use buckets, ... the first time we needed to add to the fresh tank, using our clean white 5 gal. buckets to do so, we saw partials in the bottom of the buckets, ... was either rust from the metal piping or sand from the well, which we would not have seen with a colored bucket, ... thinking the stuff would stop after running the water for a while, it didn't, ... since it would settle to the bottom, we had to settle with stopping short of "bottoms up" when pouring into our fresh tank, ... but since then, I attach our blue Camco filter onto the hose at the potable water station when initially filling the tank when we first get to the cg, ...

you may get reports of, "been camping for 140 yrs., never used a filter of any sort, and never had a problem at all", ... and I suppose that's completely possible, cause rust or sand shouldn't kill you, but that's our experience and why we use a filter, even to fill the fresh tank, ...
But that situation was unusual and even if did ended up in your holding tank the sediment filter on the pump woul catch it. Consider that if you stay in a motel in a rual area the water could be from a well and you don't filter the water. People aren't becoming sick from using motel water.
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Old 08-02-2019, 12:46 AM   #6
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But that situation was unusual and even if did ended up in your holding tank the sediment filter on the pump woul catch it. Consider that if you stay in a motel in a rual area the water could be from a well and you don't filter the water. People aren't becoming sick from using motel water.

If I DON'T see it, it may or may not be in the water, ... but when I DO see it and know it's there, and do nothing, I'm choosing to ignore it, ... knowing that that cg system has "stuff" in the water system, I choose not to ignore it, so I choose to use a filter, ... I certainly don't have to, but I choose to, ... to each his own, ...
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Old 08-02-2019, 02:01 AM   #7
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Here's an interesting video to watch about drinking water and RV's.

I drink ice tea made at home that I take a couple gallon jugs with me and if I need more, I use a gallon of bottled water. Coffee the same way. That and brown pops and some juice keeps me hydrated just fine.

Campground water is for showers and dishwashing and I hesitate with the dishwashing if there is any odor at all, usually a sign of bacteria, sulfur or something that I don't want.
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Old 08-02-2019, 07:06 AM   #8
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Here's an interesting video to watch about drinking water and RV's.

I drink ice tea made at home that I take a couple gallon jugs with me and if I need more, I use a gallon of bottled water. Coffee the same way. That and brown pops and some juice keeps me hydrated just fine.

Campground water is for showers and dishwashing and I hesitate with the dishwashing if there is any odor at all, usually a sign of bacteria, sulfur or something that I don't want.
I saw that video as well and it's what got me thinking. I buy the filter that goes on the hose and think I may just be wasting my money. They really never mention that the water from an RV park has to be safe by law. Most RV parks get there water from a municipal water source so there isn't going to be bacteria in treated municipal water systems. If your in a National Park and drinking well water it still has to be treated and safe by law. There are water fountains, rest rooms in the park that the general public uses and when was the last time you heard of people getting sick from drinking the water. I have a clear collapsible water tote that I use that I have used when our fresh water has run out and after hauling water in it I've never seen any sand or rust particles in the tote. Just got me thinking that I'm wasting my money on inline water filters.
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Old 08-02-2019, 07:12 AM   #9
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This is one of those "Personal Preference" type situations. Personally...we've never had a water filter...internal or external since 1984. I also drank out of a hose at a young age.
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Old 08-02-2019, 07:42 AM   #10
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I starting to think that people just don't trust the municipal water system or the park to properly treat their water. I guess it's possible that a park could lapse on treating the water but I would think you would have heard something about people getting sick at a park.

I think that I will buy an inline filter and only use it when I smell odour from the water source. There are some areas out west that I have come across that have a sulfur smell and an inline charcoal filter should help but if the water smells and tastes fine I think I'm going filterless.
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