Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-09-2016, 03:32 PM   #1
RailwayRog
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 71
Sand In Hot Water Tank

Earlier in the year I drained the water out of my Atwood GC6AA-10E.
I just came back to it today to put the drain plug back in and notice what appeared to be a fine light color sand where the water evaporated after it ran out. I use a water filter most of the time.
Could it be the aluminum tank or electric heater element disintegrating?
Electric water heater worked last time I used it, (extremely hot and no way to turn it down).
__________________

__________________
RailwayRog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2016, 03:35 PM   #2
Head Rambler
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Southwest Alabama
Posts: 4,321
It could be calcium deposits. It'll create a fine sand like powder when it dries out.
__________________

__________________
Salem 29RKSS Pushing a GMC Sierra 2500HD!
Gotta go campin!
Bama Rambler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2016, 03:55 PM   #3
Site Team
 
Flybob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 5,552
X2 most likely the minerals that were in the water. They should rinse out fairly easily.
__________________

2015 Freedom Express 248RBS
TV 2015 Silverado HD2500 Duramax
TST Tire Monitors
Honda 2000I + Companion
2 100W solar panels
Flybob is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2016, 04:28 PM   #4
RailwayRog
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 71
Thanx, I'm relieved that it isn't something serious.
__________________
RailwayRog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2016, 01:01 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Full timer,,,at Lake Georgetown in central Texas for the winter.
Posts: 426
RailwayRog,,,,,if you use propane instead of electric,,,,you'll develope sand from the calcium in the water. Upside?......Easy to flush out.....Downside????....Propane costs.
Flush it out a couple times a year with good water pressure, and make sure you use a sacrificial anode in your water heater.
__________________
Grampa Jim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2016, 01:06 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Waynesville
Posts: 12,015
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grampa Jim View Post
RailwayRog,,,,,if you use propane instead of electric,,,,you'll develope sand from the calcium in the water. Upside?......Easy to flush out.....Downside????....Propane costs.
Flush it out a couple times a year with good water pressure, and make sure you use a sacrificial anode in your water heater.
He has a Atwood,no A-Rod! Youroo!!
__________________
youroo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2016, 01:09 PM   #7
RailwayRog
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grampa Jim View Post
RailwayRog,,,,,if you use propane instead of electric,,,,you'll develope sand from the calcium in the water
Interesting, I learn something new everyday.
I do try to use electric as much as possible.
It's an aluminium tank, they suppose to have anodes?
__________________
RailwayRog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2016, 01:11 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Full timer,,,at Lake Georgetown in central Texas for the winter.
Posts: 426
Youroo,,,,I use an anode regardless of the brand. The rod gets eaten up regardless,,,,,so I think the rod is good for the tank. I was a chemistry major in another lifetime, so I know there are ions floating around looking for something to cling to and do their job. It's a very cheap insurance policy of less than $20 a year.
__________________
Grampa Jim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2016, 01:15 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Full timer,,,at Lake Georgetown in central Texas for the winter.
Posts: 426
A magnesium anode is good to have with an aluminum tank since magnesium is more vulnerable to attack by the ions. The magnesium is a good "sacrificial lamb" to protect the aluminum. I had a friend a few years ago who had pinholes in his heater. I asked him about the anode that wasn't there. "Anode? What's that." Nuf said bout that. I recommend putting one in there.
__________________
Grampa Jim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2016, 02:24 PM   #10
Head Rambler
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Southwest Alabama
Posts: 4,321
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grampa Jim View Post
RailwayRog,,,,,if you use propane instead of electric,,,,you'll develope sand from the calcium in the water. Upside?......Easy to flush out.....Downside????....Propane costs.
Flush it out a couple times a year with good water pressure, and make sure you use a sacrificial anode in your water heater.
How does the heat source affect the precipitation of minerals in the heater? Since they're both technically heating a metal tube and that transfers heat to the water. Granted, the tube is larger on the propane side, but the mechanism is the same.
__________________

__________________
Salem 29RKSS Pushing a GMC Sierra 2500HD!
Gotta go campin!
Bama Rambler is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
hot water, tank, water, water tank

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:37 PM.