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Old 08-04-2014, 05:46 PM   #11
rce
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On the cheap....
Get the genny. That sounds like a good price for a genny. Is it new or used?
New , at Amazon.ca $179, CDN so a little more than I remembered:

Power Force KCG-951G 950-watt Portable Generator
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Old 08-04-2014, 06:12 PM   #12
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That genny is 800 watts continuous. Don't expect anything other than charging the batteries. If you try to put fridge on 120vac (Auto mode) that'll take 350-500 watts of that original 800 watts. So, keep the fridge on propane. Don't even try the water heater on electric!

FYI, keep an eye on the output voltage, It may vary a bit. At least monitor it during a trial run at home.

Good Luck! Enjoy the trip.
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Old 08-04-2014, 07:16 PM   #13
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Some generators put out "dirty power" You would not want to run sensitive electronic equpment on them. Plus if you have any problems with them you just throw them away because they are not worth the labor and parts to work on them.

I think if you shop around you can get a used 1000 watt inverter type generator (honda my preferance) for $300 to $400. It would be enough to power your frige 300 to 400 watts and your converter for charging the batteries. I agree if you have a electric water heater I would keep it on propane...
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Old 08-05-2014, 10:50 AM   #14
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Some generators put out "dirty power" You would not want to run sensitive electronic equpment on them. Plus if you have any problems with them you just throw them away because they are not worth the labor and parts to work on them.

I think if you shop around you can get a used 1000 watt inverter type generator (honda my preferance) for $300 to $400. It would be enough to power your frige 300 to 400 watts and your converter for charging the batteries. I agree if you have a electric water heater I would keep it on propane...
My thoughts are I would connect my battery charger/tender to the generator once a day for an hour or two and directly charge the battery
thus not putting any trailer electronics at risk (other than the battery!) But have no idea if this would be sufficient to keep just the fridge running day by day on propane only???
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Old 08-05-2014, 11:08 AM   #15
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That should be fine. I dry camp a few times a year and can get by with the fridge and a few lights sparingly along with running the furnace off and on lightly for about three nights without taking my two group 24s below 60%. A few hours a day with a charger should work for you.
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Old 08-05-2014, 03:45 PM   #16
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My thoughts are I would connect my battery charger/tender to the generator once a day for an hour or two and directly charge the battery
thus not putting any trailer electronics at risk (other than the battery!) But have no idea if this would be sufficient to keep just the fridge running day by day on propane only???
You'll be ok. I used to run a pair of cheapo dual purpose batteries for a couple of days, being very conservative with incandescent lights and minimal heat (as in just enough to take chill out right before bed) before charging.

If you have time, you could try to eliminate any parasitic draws to maximize the battery life.
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Old 08-05-2014, 04:37 PM   #17
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It will be easy enough to find out. You don't need to spend alot of money on a Volt meter. I would use this one Volt Minder. I would try to connect direct to your batteries. Once you have a battery meter at home set your furnace to come on about 5 or 10 degrees above outside temperature. Let it run all night and check to see what your battery level is in the morning.
VoltMinder Digital Volt Meter w/ 6 Foot Cord for 12V Batteries: Amazon.com: Industrial & Scientific

What I learned over several years of dry camping. When I had my single battery I could not even make it one night running the furnace set at 55 degrees inside at 40 degrees outside . We eventually stretched our dry camping into about 5 to 6 weeks without being plugged into shore power we had access to water and a dump station but no power. We use just a generator to charge the batteries. We beefed up our battery bank to four deep cycle batteries. I am not a power Mizer.. I watch TV with Satellite runing on inverters. I switched over half of my lighting to LED. I would run my generator (Honda 2000) about four hours a day. My battery charged would start out at about 13.2 volts and as time went on I would slowly see my battery level drop. After about two weeks...12.7...3 weeks 12.5 and by the 5th week 12.3. The story is four hours a day was just not enough time to FULLY charge the batteries. I have a 3 stage converter which charges at higher voltage at first then drops to a trickle as the batteries level starts to come up. Plust running a generator is not free. Even a small generator could drink a gallon of gas a day... A couple days not not much expense but over 30 days it could add up.

I have been researching solar. Problems with solar, COST although I have found a pretty good 300 watt panel with controler for under $700. Also I don't like parking in the SUN. I usally look for the best shady spot. Not too helpful for having solar. You could go with a portable panel but then the problems of hauling a large solar panel and theft to worry about. Eventually I probably will go with solar. As a Dry Camper it is the best option.
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Old 08-05-2014, 06:15 PM   #18
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We won't be running a furnace at all believe me. We're comfortable down to 32F (0 Celcius). Being from Canada have lots of sleeping bags good to -15 if necessary!

Also Utah in September they warn us will still be hot!

Have a Deltran Battery Tender Plus which seems to be highly rated so just need the small generator to run the Deltran (or lots of block ice).

Another crazy thought ... I have a 12 volt inverter for my truck. Could I use that plus the Deltran battery charger to charge my trailer battery using the truck battery? Or just asking for trouble? We will be driving around some to recharge the truck battery via the alternator.
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Old 08-05-2014, 06:46 PM   #19
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It would depend on where in Utah you are. Moab for example in September is warm during the day but can go below freezing at night. You have to keep the rig warm enough so pipes don't freeze..

It would depend on how many watts your inverter is and how many amps to watts your charger puts out.. All in all not very efficient...
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Old 08-05-2014, 07:34 PM   #20
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It would depend on where in Utah you are. Moab for example in September is warm during the day but can go below freezing at night. You have to keep the rig warm enough so pipes don't freeze..

It would depend on how many watts your inverter is and how many amps to watts your charger puts out.. All in all not very efficient...
Unfortunately only option will be to drain the water if it gets that cold! With the average low in Moab in September 53 F hoping that won't be an issue... Could pump some antifreeze through but then of course need battery power to run the water pump!
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