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Old 10-05-2016, 09:40 PM   #31
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I see a lot of different style heaters all rated as 1500 watts. But I never see what BTUs they produce. I would think that the heater design would effect the BTU output, or am I wrong? Is there some way to calculate BTU output?
1 kW = 3412.142 BTU/hr

So 1500 watts = 1.5kw = 5,118.213 BTU/hr
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Old 10-05-2016, 10:27 PM   #32
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yup, thats the joys of electric heat, pretty easy to calculate heat output!

Electric heat, regardless of their design can be calculated at nearly 100% efficiency, because inefficiency in electrical devices is what creates heat. If the unit is designed to produce heat, and the byproduct of its inefficiency is heat, you have heat

though, something like an oil filled radiant heater can help with overloading circuits that are just borderline tripping the breaker, as the heating element doesnt have to run as steady once the unit is warmed up.

Oh and dont forget your voltage drops too. If youve got a pretty wicked voltage drop, you increase the power draw on that circuit (resistive loads such as a heater will increase amperage/wattage as voltage decreases) so that 1500w might draw 10a @ 115v its going to draw more like 15a @ 100v.
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Old 10-06-2016, 05:46 PM   #33
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Oil filled radiator type
This is what we take. Good radiant heat. Once the oil gets hot you can run on low.
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Old 10-06-2016, 07:01 PM   #34
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Thank you. That clears the water somewhate. What I am hearing is that a 1500 watt heater, whether it's radiant, ceramic, or infra red will produce the same heat. A person needs to compare safety features, controls, and possible footprint to pick the best for them. Am I correct with that statement?
How long does it usually take to heat up an oil heater? It looks like they would take up a lot of room.
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Old 10-06-2016, 07:13 PM   #35
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My oil heater takes about 5/7 minutes......but I've actually ever timed it......they have wheels, and I don't feel they take up much room.....table for lap-top takes up more. Just measured it...25" high, i4" wide, 9" deep
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Old 10-06-2016, 08:49 PM   #36
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Thank you. That clears the water somewhate. What I am hearing is that a 1500 watt heater, whether it's radiant, ceramic, or infra red will produce the same heat. A person needs to compare safety features, controls, and possible footprint to pick the best for them. Am I correct with that statement?
How long does it usually take to heat up an oil heater? It looks like they would take up a lot of room.
Yes, you're correct. The oil heaters have a thermal mass that requires some time to heat up, and that then gives off heat for some time after the heating element shuts off. So the theory is that it provides a more even level of heating.
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Old 10-06-2016, 09:09 PM   #37
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[QUOTE=vasnipe;1334711]We plug an oil filled heater in the coach and a heavy extension cord to the pedestal for a small ceramic heater. QUOTE]

Beat me to it.

If we want to run 2 electric heaters, or 1 heater and a hair dryer we will run a heavy 12 gauge extension out through the slide seal directly to the pedestal.

That way the RVs breakers are not involved at all. Started doing this after a breakfast in February when we were asking "why is it cold in here and why isn't the coffee ready yet?"

Because of a tripped breaker.
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Old 10-06-2016, 09:11 PM   #38
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For that reason, I've added 2 dedicated circuits.....
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Old 10-06-2016, 11:00 PM   #39
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I like my very quiet and compact Heat Storm infrared heater for my small class C , especially for it's thermastat. I put it up on my stove top so the dogs won't knock it. I use the oil heaters at home in my hard to heat three story log cabin. I like that they are safe, quiet and efficient. They do take awhile to heat up. I think they are better suited for larger rv 's with more floor space for them or I would use one on the road too.
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Old 10-07-2016, 07:08 AM   #40
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The main reason I chuckle at the Eden Pure advertisements. What a rip off. 1500 watts consumed by an Eden Pure or a box store heater at 1/5th the price of an Eden Pure, produces EXACTLY the same BTU output.

And... under UL guidelines, the maximum (legal to be sold in the United States) current draw is 1500 watts for a 110/1 resistance heater.

Eden Pure is creative and deceptive advertising at it's best (and worst)....
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