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Old 04-08-2015, 12:57 PM   #41
B47
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I respectfully disagree with the above statement. Soldering in effect "tins" the wire. . Which gives MUCH greater resistance to corrosion. When I use tinned wire on marine electrical I can fix it and forget about it.
Probably true in marine applications and other highly corressive environments In which a crimped connection shouldn't be used in the first place.

For RV's and other applications,a properly crimped connection is fine.
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Old 04-08-2015, 01:01 PM   #42
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We'll have to agree to disagree....
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Old 04-08-2015, 01:05 PM   #43
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We'll have to agree to disagree....
No problem - I know how to do that.
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Old 04-08-2015, 01:08 PM   #44
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In an attempt to bridge the gap...I'll mention that you can get adhesive lined connectors that keep the water out and are much less subject to corrosion than plain crimps...and less of a pain than soldering.
Everything you need to know about crimping is here. Note the section on the type of crimper to be used vs. the $2 ones that most people have. Makes a big difference to have a proper rachet crimp.
Cable crimping - DIYWiki
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Old 04-08-2015, 01:22 PM   #45
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In an attempt to bridge the gap...I'll mention that you can get adhesive lined connectors that keep the water out and are much less subject to corrosion than plain crimps...and less of a pain than soldering.
Everything you need to know about crimping is here. Note the section on the type of crimper to be used vs. the $2 ones that most people have. Makes a big difference to have a proper rachet crimp.
Cable crimping - DIYWiki
Good article. Like almost everything else, use the right tool,the right materials and the proper technique and life is much easier.

Getting the connector crimped 360 degrees around the wire is essistial to getting the proper crimp.

I have seen and used connectors like those shown,but they had little "windows" in them to ensure the wire was fully inserted before crimping.
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Old 04-08-2015, 01:29 PM   #46
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Good advice camaraderie, this is a step above a "naked" crimp. Some of the adhesive lined connectors are crimp, some require heat, and some are a combination of both. Make sure you get the correct ones for your application .I've also on occasion have used the adhesive lined shrink tubing over a crimp. This requires heat tho'
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