Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-29-2016, 07:43 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Cedar Creek Lake, TX
Posts: 1,225
Mine drops to 13.18 so that us close. Still a bit high for long term.
__________________

__________________
Cedar Creek Lake, Texas
2017 Wildwood 27 RLSS
2016 Ram 5.7L crewcab, 8 speed transmission
CedarCreekWoody is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2016, 07:48 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
northstar1960's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: in my new 29hfsxlr
Posts: 1,658
When on shore power i keep my batteries disconnected . i do once a month use the inverter to watch tv a few evenings and then will put a charger on the batteries to bring them back up . just to keep them exercised
__________________

__________________
northstar1960 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2016, 10:46 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Mountain Foothills of Southern Alberta
Posts: 798
No need to exercise the batteries, actually they will last longer the less times they are discharged.
__________________

2007 Surveyor SV230
- 200 Watts Solar/MPPT Controller - 230 AH Battery Bank - 600 watt PSW Inverter - (2) 2000 watt Inverter Generators - LED Lighting - Boon Docking 99% of the time.
2009 F150 - 5.4 Litre - Tow Package
boondocking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2016, 08:09 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 3,155
Quote:
Originally Posted by CedarCreekWoody View Post
Mine drops to 13.18 so that us close. Still a bit high for long term.
Trimetric solar charger sometimes shows 13.2v, as does the Magnum inverter / charger. Both have temperature compensation, so I think this is normal and good.
WW
__________________
WolfWhistle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2016, 08:36 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 3,155
Quote:
Originally Posted by pgandw View Post
The best way to know whether the battery is being overcharged is to get out a voltmeter.

After fully charging the battery, the converter should drop down into a trickle charge mode (approx 13.1V for most converters), which simply maintains the battery. According to the WFCO manual, WFCO converters (common standard equipment in RVs) are supposed to drop from 13.6V (normal charging) to 13.1V after 44 hours of near constant current.

The WFCO in my A-frame will not go into trickle mode after several weeks, and with only the propane/CO detector and the stereo on. It remains at 13.7 volts, which is too high for long term storage. So I will be installing a new converter. In the meantime, I disconnect the battery after fully charging for several days after a trip.

I'm disappointed because 1) I finally figured this out 2 months after the 2nd year of warranty expired, 2) it may have caused the failure of my initial set of 12V batteries (I had 2 Size 24, one went bad and took the other one with it after bad decisions on my part), 3) the A-Frame has a combination converter/electrical panel which means more rewiring than just replacing a converter. On the bright side, I will get a better converter that will charge my batteries faster, and I can clean up the wiring rat's nest (and lack of proper color codes) that came standard behind the converter.

just my experiences, yours may differ
Fred W
2014 Rockwood A122 A-frame
2008 Hyundai Entourage minivan
camping Colorado and adjacent states one weekend at a time
p, I am not an expert, but rely on the battery manufacturers data when I make states like I do. If they are wrong, we certainly will not know better than they. 13.7v is too low for absorb and too high for float. So, this charger is junk.

And, is probably the reason your batteries aren't lasting like they should.

Absorb should be somewhere near 14.7v and depending on temperature; and as high as 15.1v it it is very cold outside, with temperature compensation in place.

I respectfully disagree with your statement that the best way to determine full is with a volt meter. Hydrometer is number one, because it isn't affected by the battery's temperature. If the battery under test was just under load or just being charged the battery is warm and needs to return to room temperature before being read. The difference in true voltage and the higher voltage is significant. Now, if the battery is sealed, a volt meter is the only way, but again the temperature needs to stabilize.
WW
__________________
WolfWhistle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2016, 08:37 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 3,155
Quote:
Originally Posted by boondocking View Post
No need to exercise the batteries, actually they will last longer the less times they are discharged.
Do you ever give them an equalize charge?
WW
__________________
WolfWhistle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2016, 08:40 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 203
I leave my TH plugged in to shore power 24/7 when I'm home. Batteries are at least 3 years old and no problems.
__________________
rblack22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2016, 10:17 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
northstar1960's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: in my new 29hfsxlr
Posts: 1,658
Quote:
Originally Posted by boondocking View Post
No need to exercise the batteries, actually they will last longer the less times they are discharged.
yes batteries have a cycle life . to let them sit un used will cause them to drain over time and lose charge and shorten life . to keep them on a maintainer can and does cause them to 1. boil out 2. sulfate . both ruin batteries . some smart maintainers that will stop charging and actually put a drain on the battery then into charge mode is ok , but imo just ok .
what i do is no different then a smart maintainer other then i choose when the battery is charged and when it is used . buy doing this i have batteries that last avg 7yrs
So to use a battery and run the charge level to around 65/70% and then recharge is better then a full time maintainer . i do this on avg once a month . the batteries sit get used a few days and then fully charged . doing this once a month is a good avg and does not shorten the life of a battery.
__________________
northstar1960 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2016, 11:16 AM   #19
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 969
Quote:
Originally Posted by WolfWhistle View Post
p, I am not an expert, but rely on the battery manufacturers data when I make states like I do. If they are wrong, we certainly will not know better than they. 13.7v is too low for absorb and too high for float. So, this charger is junk.

And, is probably the reason your batteries aren't lasting like they should.

Absorb should be somewhere near 14.7v and depending on temperature; and as high as 15.1v it it is very cold outside, with temperature compensation in place.

I respectfully disagree with your statement that the best way to determine full is with a volt meter. Hydrometer is number one, because it isn't affected by the battery's temperature. If the battery under test was just under load or just being charged the battery is warm and needs to return to room temperature before being read. The difference in true voltage and the higher voltage is significant. Now, if the battery is sealed, a volt meter is the only way, but again the temperature needs to stabilize.
A hydrometer is a more accurate read than a voltmeter - but it's reading the battery, not the converter. The OP was asking if his battery was being overcharged by his converter. The voltmeter tells me what my converter is doing when it is on - a hydrometer does not.

As far as charge voltages, what the battery manufacturers say only matters to the designers of converters. RV converters have preset, non-adjustable voltage points - at least models that will fit in a 12ft box A-frame. Temperature compensation is a joke when my batteries are out on the tongue, and the converter is inside under the dinette, next to the water heater.

The "normal mode" for both Progressive and WFCO converters is preset at 13.6 volts (my voltmeter measured 13.7 on my WFCO - either meter or converter calibration could be off by 0.1 volts).

Storage (trickle) mode on WFCO is 13.1V; PD says 13.2V. The WFCO cutover from normal is 44 hours, PD uses 30 hours. My problem is that my WFCO would never drop from normal mode into storage mode. That's why I'm replacing my WFCO, and not because of 13.7V normal mode output.

Absorb ("boost") mode is advertised by both WFCO and PD as 14.4 volts. Can most batteries handle a higher absorb voltage at normal temps, and thereby charge a little faster? Yes, but the higher the voltage, the more monitoring that should be in place to prevent boiling.

Bottom line is that no readily available converters for small RVs come close to meeting your proposed specs. I trust converter manufacturers like PD to put out a good automatic product that does not inadvertently destroy batteries.

My battery bank is two 232AH 6V Interstate golf cart batteries because they will carry me for 4 nights (high 20s or warmer) in Colorado without recharging. That's as long as we will stay in any one place with our A-frame. We wanted to keep things simple for weekend camping, which is why we chose an A-frame in the 1st place. No generator and fuel to lug, no solar panels to position.

And if my batteries only last 5 years instead of 7, I'm OK with that. I didn't waste camping time checking them with a hydrometer, and I only paid $150 for the pair, including tax. I just want the converter to recharge them fully when I'm at home so they are ready to go for the next trip.

Fred W
2014 Rockwood A122 A-Frame
2008 Hyundai Entourage minivan
camping Colorado and adjacent states one weekend at a time
__________________
pgandw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2016, 03:14 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Mountain Foothills of Southern Alberta
Posts: 798
Quote:
Originally Posted by WolfWhistle View Post
Do you ever give them an equalize charge?
WW
When they are being used in the summer I will do an equalization once a month. They are kept charged via solar.
If they are in storage for the winter a good maintainer is used. They will not sulfate or boil off if using a good maintainer.
__________________

__________________

2007 Surveyor SV230
- 200 Watts Solar/MPPT Controller - 230 AH Battery Bank - 600 watt PSW Inverter - (2) 2000 watt Inverter Generators - LED Lighting - Boon Docking 99% of the time.
2009 F150 - 5.4 Litre - Tow Package
boondocking is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
battery, converter

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:44 PM.