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Old 03-05-2013, 07:40 AM   #11
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ok. I understand that it was an evolution of sorts. I thought you might have something like an external kitchen with electric fridge on the 300 watt and everything else on the 1000 watt.
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Old 03-05-2013, 12:13 PM   #12
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Got another question. Something I didn't think about. My Morningstar TS-MPPT-60 controller puts out 60 amps maximum. With my panels I'm guessing on a good sunny day I'll be putting out 40+ amps to the batteries. Will this roast my two batteries or will the charge controller have the smarts to reduce output? I'll have the temperature and voltage leads from the MPPT 60 connected to the battery for monitoring.

solar array: 4 x 145 Watt

If the controller does not limit the current going to the battery is there some other way I can do it? One thing I was thinking was to only have 2 solar panels connected at a time. It's a bummer though. I was hoping the charge controller would limit the current automatically and on cloudy days I'd get a little more kick from the added wattage of the four panels.
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Old 03-05-2013, 06:46 PM   #13
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the controller monitors the battery state and will lower the voltage as needed to charge to the parameters you set. By dropping the voltage, the current will drop as well. My controller allows me to set the bulk rate, absorption rate, absorption time and float voltages among others. These settings are found at the battery manufacturer site.

Don't be upset if you never see 40 amps output. I understand mathematical you could see that amount of current. You would have to aim the panels perfectly, at the right ambient temperatures, perfectly clear skies and, here's the biggie..a dead battery. Yep, a mppt charge controller charges based on battery state. If it ain't drained, it won't put out the current. My system should max out at 25 amps. With my batteries around 67% (-71AHr) the charge controller only put out something like 16 amps. The battery was at 100% by mid day. I added load to panels by turning on lights and fans to get it to around 19 amps. I can't my notes so don't take the numbers exact. The point is, the controller will only put out what it determines the battery needs.
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Old 03-06-2013, 09:26 AM   #14
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On another forum somebody said you have to match your batteries and charge controller. They had also said it had no ability to figure out how many batteries you are using so it would blindly put out amps. I'll probably hook my solar panels up to a single battery this weekend via the Morning star and see what's going on. Thanks for the info man.
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Old 03-06-2013, 10:48 AM   #15
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well, you sort of do have to match them up. Use your set up for a single 12v hybrid battery, and you're wasting money. too much generation. Put a 15watt panel on dual T145, and its like peeing in a lake. plus it will sulfate the batteries.

it's true that the mppt controller doesn't know what's hooked up. To help it with charging rates, it pauses the charge and measures the battery voltage, and panel output. from this information it calculates what the charge voltage should be. charge current is directly related charge voltage. If you have a programmable controller

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, you can tweak the calculations with the battery manufacturer's data and temperature compensation.
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Old 03-06-2013, 06:33 PM   #16
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Spoke with Trojan tech today. He said that with 260 AH of battery I should be able to put 26-52 amps in without problems. I'm back to being excited about everything being well matched for my 25RR.

Let's see... I'm guessing I can burn up to about 80 AH a night and be good on battery usage. Should allow me to watch a couple movies. I'd be just fine with reading my Kindle but I can't cuddle with the wife reading the Kindle.

Glad to be nearing the end of my Solar project. Thanks to you guys. Now I just need to find a creek to throw 2 new 31D truck batteries into.
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