Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-17-2016, 09:07 AM   #201
Senior Member
 
hammer55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: central valley, california
Posts: 455
never seen solid wire from or to a battery, just sayin

Quote:
Originally Posted by OldBob View Post
Don't use stranded wire. You need solid battery cable. I got mine at Walmart. They have battery cable in 2, 4, and 6 gauge sizes at reasonable prices. 4 gauge is perfect for the job.
__________________

__________________
Mark & Annie
2014 COACHMEN PURSUIT 27 KB
Modesto, Central California
hammer55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2016, 09:48 AM   #202
Senior Member
 
Too Tall's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 813
I'm pretty sure stranded carries more current than solid?
__________________

__________________
Rockwood 2104S, 2014 Ram 2500 Diesel.
USMC 68 -70
Too Tall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2016, 09:49 AM   #203
jkoenig24
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Box Elder, SD (formerly NY)
Posts: 378
Stranded wire WILL carry more current AND, will be MUCH easier to bend and work with.
__________________
jkoenig24 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2016, 09:55 AM   #204
Senior Member
 
SeaDog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Idaho
Posts: 3,418
Actually there is no difference in the current carrying ability of stranded or solid in the same wire size. The difference is in the space required for the wire. Stranded is much larger in physical size then solid however it is much easier to bend and conform to curves and such.
__________________
Retired Navy
Jake my sidekick (yellow Lab)
2017 RAM 2500 CC 4X4 Cummins Diesel
2016 Flagstaff 26 FKWS
AF&AM of Idaho
SeaDog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2016, 10:43 AM   #205
Senior Member
 
hammer55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: central valley, california
Posts: 455
true, electricity flows on the outside of the wire, I have always used motor lead wire, it has a higher amp rating, and it is much easier to work with and makes hooking up motors in the pecker head(motor junction box much easier,,,,

Quote:
Originally Posted by SeaDog View Post
Actually there is no difference in the current carrying ability of stranded or solid in the same wire size. The difference is in the space required for the wire. Stranded is much larger in physical size then solid however it is much easier to bend and conform to curves and such.
__________________
Mark & Annie
2014 COACHMEN PURSUIT 27 KB
Modesto, Central California
hammer55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2016, 12:22 PM   #206
Site Team - Lou
 
Herk7769's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: South Eastern PA
Posts: 21,169
Quote:
Originally Posted by hammer55 View Post
true, electricity flows on the outside of the wire, I have always used motor lead wire, it has a higher amp rating, and it is much easier to work with and makes hooking up motors in the pecker head(motor junction box much easier,,,,
As I understand it:

In an AC current, current flows along the outside (skin) of the conductor and the depth of penetration is due to the circulating eddy currents (arising from a changing inductance field from the current alternating direction). These eddy currents cancel the current flow in the center of a conductor and reinforcing it in the skin. The higher the frequency of the alternating current, the more pronounced this effect.

Known as the "Skin Effect" you can get more info here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skin_effect

DC current goes through the wire in one direction only; basically an electron gets pushed in one end knocking an electron off the other.

A solid conductor will move DC current slightly more efficiently than stranded of similar gauge. However, for a similar current flow demand (wattage) a solid wire would have to be thicker and thus more inflexible (more like a Buss Bar than a wire). That is why battery wires in automobiles are made up of very thick stranded wire.

To reduce resistance in the connection between 2 6 volt deep cycle batteries, use the shortest heaviest battery cable you can find. O or even OO would be best.

6" AWG 1/0 Red Battery Interconnect Cable 3/8" Lugs Battery Banks

http://www.amazon.com/Battery-Interc...WJ212VKWX5V48M12" AWG 2/0 Red Battery Interconnect Cable 3/8" Lugs Battery Banks
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	ohms-law-illustrated.gif
Views:	47
Size:	142.3 KB
ID:	102145   Click image for larger version

Name:	330px-Skineffect_reason.svg.png
Views:	40
Size:	19.8 KB
ID:	102146  
__________________

Lou and Laura with Bella - German Short Hair Pointer
2008 GMC Sierra 2500HD Crewcab SB Allison Duramax
2010 Flagstaff 8526RLWS - Superglide 3300
HAM CALLSIGN - KC3FFW
Herk7769 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2016, 01:13 PM   #207
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Mountain Foothills of Southern Alberta
Posts: 798
The difference in resistance is very minimal 0 gauge = .00032 ohm/meter. 4 gauge = .00081 ohm/meter.
4 gauge would work just fine between your batteries.
__________________

2007 Surveyor SV230
- 200 Watts Solar/MPPT Controller - 230 AH Battery Bank - 600 watt PSW Inverter - (2) 2000 watt Inverter Generators - LED Lighting - Boon Docking 99% of the time.
2009 F150 - 5.4 Litre - Tow Package
boondocking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2016, 08:09 PM   #208
Senior Member
 
Too Tall's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 813
Quote:
Originally Posted by Herk7769 View Post
As I understand it:

In an AC current, current flows along the outside (skin) of the conductor and the depth of penetration is due to the circulating eddy currents (arising from a changing inductance field from the current alternating direction). These eddy currents cancel the current flow in the center of a conductor and reinforcing it in the skin. The higher the frequency of the alternating current, the more pronounced this effect.

Known as the "Skin Effect" you can get more info here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skin_effect

DC current goes through the wire in one direction only; basically an electron gets pushed in one end knocking an electron off the other.

A solid conductor will move DC current slightly more efficiently than stranded of similar gauge. However, for a similar current flow demand (wattage) a solid wire would have to be thicker and thus more inflexible (more like a Buss Bar than a wire). That is why battery wires in automobiles are made up of very thick stranded wire.

To reduce resistance in the connection between 2 6 volt deep cycle batteries, use the shortest heaviest battery cable you can find. O or even OO would be best.

6" AWG 1/0 Red Battery Interconnect Cable 3/8" Lugs Battery Banks

Amazon.com: 12" AWG 2/0 Red Battery Interconnect Cable 3/8" Lugs Battery Banks, Off Grid Applications DURABLE LONG LASTING ASSEMBLED IN THE USA: Automotive12" AWG 2/0 Red Battery Interconnect Cable 3/8" Lugs Battery Banks

Thanks for the link, Herk, I'm going to order one of those tonight.
__________________
Rockwood 2104S, 2014 Ram 2500 Diesel.
USMC 68 -70
Too Tall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2016, 09:15 PM   #209
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Englewood FL
Posts: 1,587
Quote:
Originally Posted by Too Tall View Post
Thanks for the link, Herk, I'm going to order one of those tonight.
Of course,Boondocking is exactly right. For a 12 inch cable at 200 amps, the difference between #4 and #00 in voltage drop is 34 millivolts or less than .3%...and 200 amps is a heavy load. The rest of the system (cable to loads, power panel, solenoids, etc) will drop a heck of a lot more and totally dominate.

By the way, stranded vs solid will add another millivolt for #4 and .3 millivolts for #00. I wouldn't want to even try to work with solid #00 copper.

Now, since the #00 cables are available, might as well buy them but your system probably has 30 feet of #4 or #6 in it anyway between the batteries and the loads...and back!
__________________

2015 335DS
ScottBrownstein is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2016, 10:45 PM   #210
Senior Member
 
Too Tall's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 813
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottBrownstein View Post
Of course,Boondocking is exactly right. For a 12 inch cable at 200 amps, the difference between #4 and #00 in voltage drop is 34 millivolts or less than .3%...and 200 amps is a heavy load. The rest of the system (cable to loads, power panel, solenoids, etc) will drop a heck of a lot more and totally dominate.

By the way, stranded vs solid will add another millivolt for #4 and .3 millivolts for #00. I wouldn't want to even try to work with solid #00 copper.

Now, since the #00 cables are available, might as well buy them but your system probably has 30 feet of #4 or #6 in it anyway between the batteries and the loads...and back!
Yea, good point. And I don't think I'll ever run anything in the camper that would draw more than a few amps.
__________________

__________________
Rockwood 2104S, 2014 Ram 2500 Diesel.
USMC 68 -70
Too Tall is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
battery

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:14 PM.