Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-21-2016, 09:15 PM   #21
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 6
gas wont light except when on 12 volt
__________________

__________________
agsadt56 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2016, 09:26 PM   #22
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Warsaw,NC
Posts: 4,284
When I saw the furnace was off I knew something else was wrong. I like 6 volt batteries, I have used 6 volt batteries for a long time, just one at a time


Sent from my iPhone using Forest River Forums
__________________

__________________
2015 Cedar Creek 32RL
2012 Silverado 3500HD SRW
http://www.forestriverforums.com/for...ignhavefun.gif
spock123 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2016, 10:42 PM   #23
Site Team - Lou
 
Herk7769's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: South Eastern PA
Posts: 21,169
Quote:
Originally Posted by EdnKat View Post
Herk, I think that first diagram will result in 24 volts. 'Batteries connected in series', doubles the voltage. Parallel + to +, - to -, doubles the amp hr.
That is correct; one image is how to properly connect 2 6 volt batteries and the other how to properly connect 2 12 volt batteries.
__________________

Lou and Laura with Bella - German Short Hair Pointer
2008 GMC Sierra 2500HD Crewcab SB Allison Duramax
2010 Flagstaff 8526RLWS - Superglide 3300
HAM CALLSIGN - KC3FFW
Herk7769 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2016, 11:08 PM   #24
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Florida
Posts: 282
Quote:
Originally Posted by thunderstruck View Post
Trying to figure out 6 volt batteries. Would like to upgrade to 2- 6 volt batteries to get more off Generator TV time at non hook up sites. Having a hard time shopping for them. I understand I'm looking for " golf cart " batteries but any other ways to do research or recommendation on places to purchase. Also any opinions on if this is a good way to go. Right now I have 2-12 volts on a Rockwood 2604ws
My own opinion after over 65 years of camping is that 2 6v are by far better than 2 12v.. The 6v plates are about twice as thick as a 12v battery's plate. I'm only buy Trojan T-105 golf cart batteries. Down here in the Tampa Bay area I pay $105 for each battery. They usually last about 8 years. During the time I was using 12v batteries I never had them last more than 3 years. Often less than 2 years. I switched to 6v batteries about 25 years ago and never looked back.

Just my own experience. I know others have different preferences.
__________________
OldBob

I may be old but I'm trying, very trying.
2015 RAM 1500 - EcoDiesel
Rockwood Ultra V 2715VS
OldBob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2016, 06:52 AM   #25
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Englewood FL
Posts: 1,587
I have read and participated in the 6 v 12 volt discussions many times over the years. Batteries are all about weight. More weight...more capacity. It all depends on how much space you have to yield the maximum weight. The decision is actually quite simple. A 12 volt battery contains 6-2 volt cells in series (6 caps) while a 6 volt unit has 3 of those cells in series (3 caps.) This means that for the same volume, a 12 volt battery needs to allow space for 6 additional cell walls (more plastic) and as a result has less room for thicker plates and electrolyte. Of course it gets a little complicated since there is no exact 6v to 12v comparison, but you can compare a Trojan T105(6V) against a Trojan 27TMH (12V), both flooded and both deep cycle. The 12v is longer (those extra cells!) and the 6V is both a little wider and higher. However, both weigh around 61 to 62 pounds. Two 27TMHs in parallel should give you 400 minutes at 25 amps while two T105s in series will definitely yield 447 minutes at 25 amps, which is a 10% increase in boondocking capacity, even at an identical weight. An additional benefit is that the two 6 volt batteries in series will always equalize better (all cells getting the same recharge) while the two 12 volt units could be prone to one battery getting more charge or discharge than the other since they are used in parallel and one path will always have slightly lower resistance. This means that one of the batteries will charge and discharge slightly faster and age more quickly than the other.

An additional benefit of the 6 Volt units is that there are more weight options at the same footprint. You can go to T145's with the same physical footprint, get another 10 pounds of lead and be rewarded with 530 minutes at 25 amps, which is a whopping 33% increase (after your bank account has healed!)

If you have only one battery...you have no choice. Two or more...go with 6 volt deep cycle.
__________________

2015 335DS
ScottBrownstein is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2016, 08:54 AM   #26
Site Team - Lou
 
Herk7769's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: South Eastern PA
Posts: 21,169
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkoenig24 View Post
DON'T SCRIMP ON THE CABLING!!!!!!!

A welding shop can custom fabricate the heavy duty cables that will allow you to get the most out of your batteries. "Standard" battery cables will restrict the amps that can flow.
It is critically important to make the battery "interconnecting" cables as short as possible; as BIG in diameter as possible; and of as equal in length as possible. The idea is to reduce and equalize the resistance between the charge/load source and the battery system ground by as much you can.

Even small differences in Ohms can cause major differences in how each battery responds to loads and charge rates.

(This is another reason why charging your camper battery with your truck while towing is terribly inefficient - though better than nothing) - See attached document regarding this topic.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Automobile Alternators as Chargers.pdf (805.9 KB, 42 views)
__________________

Lou and Laura with Bella - German Short Hair Pointer
2008 GMC Sierra 2500HD Crewcab SB Allison Duramax
2010 Flagstaff 8526RLWS - Superglide 3300
HAM CALLSIGN - KC3FFW
Herk7769 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2016, 09:17 AM   #27
Senior Member
 
tahoe1840's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Lake Tahoe
Posts: 128
Batteries Plus

I just did a cross over from 12 volt to 6's, consider Batteries Plus for a store. They typically carry Trojan T-105s so you wont have to pay shipping. Their price point is real good. I read a few things about the Costco Batteries that I did not like so we cut to the chase and went with Trojans. Also 6's are taller so you will have to purchase new boxes or a box system that will accommodate the height. We will not go back to 12's these 6's are amazing!
__________________
tahoe1840 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2016, 09:29 AM   #28
Senior Member
 
SeaDog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Idaho
Posts: 3,418
The 6 Volt option is a good one and has worked well for many folks, with that said myself I'll stick with the 12V batteries and the ease to find replacement should I have a problem. My stay length is not dependent on batteries or converter should either fail I have 2 yamaha's and a 12 volt charger.
__________________
Retired Navy
Jake my sidekick (yellow Lab)
2017 RAM 2500 CC 4X4 Cummins Diesel
2016 Flagstaff 26 FKWS
AF&AM of Idaho
SeaDog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2016, 09:44 AM   #29
Site Team - Lou
 
Herk7769's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: South Eastern PA
Posts: 21,169
Make sure you are comparing apples to apples.

When considering the decision between 6 volt and 12 volt banks, these items should be considered:

1) Weight - Good quality TRUE deep cycle batteries are heavy.

NOTE - most batteries delivered with travel trailers are not deep cycle batteries; they are the so called "Dual Purpose Marine" batteries. Marine batteries have thinner plates than deep storage batteries because they are expected to be able to START the boat engine and then provide some limited storage for accessories at anchorage. BUT THEY ARE LIGHTER and CHEAPER so they get put in by the dealerships (not FR who ships units without batteries).

NEVER use "automobile" batteries. They are for starting only and have almost NO storage capability. With the engine in ACC, turn on the radio and play the radio for a few hours. You won't have enough oomph to start the car.

2) Cost - True Deep Cycle batteries have more than twice the lead of Dual Purpose batteries and three times the lead of starting batteries to hold that capacity. Lead is expensive.

3) Amp Hours - Whether provided by 6 volt or 12 volt batteries, AH is EVERYTHING. Nothing else matters to determine how long a battery bank will last when being used.

NOTE: CCA is Cold Cranking Amps and that means you DON'T want that battery. Dual Purpose batteries have CCA and RC numbers. RC stands for "Reserve Capacity" and is in MINUTES of life when disconnected from a charging source. To Convert RC to AH you must multiply the RC by 0.4167

An RC of 200 minutes is equal to a storage battery of 83.3 AH for example.

4) Battery size - There are several "common" sizes (24, 27, etc) each battery size increase has more plates, more weight, and is bigger physically that the previous size.

If you upgraded your stock 12 volt batteries to Trojan 12 volt deep discharge batteries of similar size you will be VERY pleased with the result. Similar sized Deep Cycle storage batteries have about 50% more capacity than Dual Purpose batteries.

Buying large batteries that won't fit your camper is wasted money.
Measure many times before you order.

5) Venting - Make sure your vents are large enough to handle the gasses created during charging larger banks. Battery gasses are flammable (explosively so in confined spaces) and have been known to set off your propane detector.

I am sure there is more, but need to get going...
__________________

Lou and Laura with Bella - German Short Hair Pointer
2008 GMC Sierra 2500HD Crewcab SB Allison Duramax
2010 Flagstaff 8526RLWS - Superglide 3300
HAM CALLSIGN - KC3FFW
Herk7769 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2016, 10:01 AM   #30
Senior Member
 
SKnight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,428
One thing I keep hearing here and in all of these discussions. If you have a 6V battery die, you're dead in the water. But if you have a 12V die you can go on with the other 12V (in a dual system) or just go find a replacement.

If a 6V up and dies, you're not out of business. If all you can find is a 12V battery, then get it, drop it in the box and connect your cables to that battery only, leaving your good 6V disconnected in its box. From an equipment standpoint, the cables are the same, you just connect them differently.

Because honestly, while we boondock how often are we that isolated from civilization? Plus, batteries rarely just up and die. A hydrometer check will usually indicate issues before they become issues and should be part of every boondock trip.
__________________

__________________
Now-2014 Sierra 346RETS 5er BUB
Then-2002 Keystone Springdale 286RLDS TT

Nights camped in 2014-28, 2015-127, 2016-10
SKnight is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
battery

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:12 AM.