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Old 11-15-2019, 01:33 PM   #1
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Another Tire Problem

So I'm driving south out of Atlanta on I475( Macon bypass) and a trucker
gives the signal that something is not right. I pull over to find my bumper cap
had come loose and I'm dragging 20 foot sewer hose. Not too major. I put the
torn up hose back in the bumper and went on my way. I had a small chain
attached to cap and bumper so I did not loose it. What's this got to do with
tires you say. So,10 miles down the road,now on I75, the front passenger
side GY Marathon blows. And I can only guess the belts flopping around takes
out the rear passenger side tire. Two flats one spare. I call good SAM and they
send a repairman with 2 Hercules Power ST2 ST225/75R15 tires. (which I paid
lots of $$ for) They are Load Range E. The Flagstaff 8528RKWS came with
china bombs Load Range C which I replaced 4-5 years ago with the Marathons
Load Range D. The GVWR 9070lbs. I certainly don't need the "E"s but I need
to replace the other two Marathons. Assuming it is ok to have the "E"s on,
what PSI should I inflate them to? The Marathons were PSI 65 max and I
kept them at @ 62. The Hercules are PSI 80 MAX. So any suggestions on
how to handle this situation? Sorry this got a little wordy. It was quite the
trip.
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Old 11-15-2019, 01:41 PM   #2
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I would start with airing them up to the same PSI as the other side.

If I were you I would keep one of the E tires for a spare and replace 4 tires on the camper with D load range Endurance.
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Old 11-15-2019, 02:10 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dkrap View Post
So I'm driving south out of Atlanta on I475( Macon bypass) and a trucker
gives the signal that something is not right. I pull over to find my bumper cap
had come loose and I'm dragging 20 foot sewer hose. Not too major. I put the
torn up hose back in the bumper and went on my way. I had a small chain
attached to cap and bumper so I did not loose it. What's this got to do with
tires you say. So,10 miles down the road,now on I75, the front passenger
side GY Marathon blows. And I can only guess the belts flopping around takes
out the rear passenger side tire. Two flats one spare. I call good SAM and they
send a repairman with 2 Hercules Power ST2 ST225/75R15 tires. (which I paid
lots of $$ for) They are Load Range E. The Flagstaff 8528RKWS came with
china bombs Load Range C which I replaced 4-5 years ago with the Marathons
Load Range D. The GVWR 9070lbs. I certainly don't need the "E"s but I need
to replace the other two Marathons. Assuming it is ok to have the "E"s on,
what PSI should I inflate them to? The Marathons were PSI 65 max and I
kept them at @ 62. The Hercules are PSI 80 MAX. So any suggestions on
how to handle this situation? Sorry this got a little wordy. It was quite the
trip.
Oh,forgot to mention,not a peep from my Tire Minder TPMS.
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Old 11-15-2019, 02:15 PM   #4
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Well . . . . so much for the tire minder!

I'd guess the front tire had failed for awhile. This put much more pressure on the remaining rear tire which ultimately couldn't cope with the additional load. It happens a lot with tandem axles. It's not uncommon to see a tandem trailer beside the road with both tires on one side flat.

I'd definitely find out "what's up" with that tire minder.

Sorry you had all that trouble.
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Old 11-15-2019, 02:17 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rsdata View Post
I would start with airing them up to the same PSI as the other side.

If I were you I would keep one of the E tires for a spare and replace 4 tires on the camper with D load range Endurance.
If I do that,maybe you want to buy the other Hercules? haha
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Old 11-15-2019, 02:31 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by acadianbob View Post
Well . . . . so much for the tire minder!

I'd guess the front tire had failed for awhile. This put much more pressure on the remaining rear tire which ultimately couldn't cope with the additional load. It happens a lot with tandem axles. It's not uncommon to see a tandem trailer beside the road with both tires on one side flat.

I'd definitely find out "what's up" with that tire minder.

Sorry you had all that trouble.
I have on and off success with the tire minder. This was my first blowout
but have had a leaking tire at a campground which the minder alerted me.
You really need them to work while driving down an interstate.
Thanks for your comment.
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Old 11-15-2019, 02:45 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dkrap View Post
I have on and off success with the tire minder. This was my first blowout
but have had a leaking tire at a campground which the minder alerted me.
You really need them to work while driving down an interstate.
Thanks for your comment.
If a wireless TPMS system doesn't update properly one can drive a fair distance after a puncture before the "ALERT" will be sent out.

The timeliness of the warning is everything when it comes to driving down the road.

Another factor is where the warning point is set for low pressure. If the low pressure limit is let's say set for 10% less than recommended pressure, and the tire is at or near it's maximum capacity at recommended level, a 9% pressure drop won't trigger the alarm but it well could allow the tire to become overheated. Heat is the real reason tires fail. Punctures merely let the air out that was keeping the tire from overheating.
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Old 11-15-2019, 03:10 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dkrap View Post
Assuming it is ok to have the "E"s on,
what PSI should I inflate them to? The Marathons were PSI 65 max and I
kept them at @ 62. The Hercules are PSI 80 MAX. So any suggestions on
how to handle this situation?

Sorry to hear about your troubles. Until you purchase the new tires, remember that you should pair like tires on the same axle with a mis-matched set.
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Old 11-15-2019, 03:18 PM   #9
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If it was me, I'd go by the pressure on the tire,,not maxed but close. Did you find out why the tires failed?
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Old 11-15-2019, 03:40 PM   #10
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Why not go with the inflation recommendations from the tire manufacturer for the load you are carrying on them?

Why does everyone try to turn this into rocket science?

The manufacturers have done all the engineering and testing to come up with the recommended inflation pressures at given loads. Why doesn't anyone want to use that? Why is what someone on a R/V forum suggests, better than that?
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Old 11-15-2019, 04:05 PM   #11
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If it were me, I'd get two more of the Hercules tires mounted so you would have four identical on the road and inflate them to 75psi cold. Keep the two Marathons for spares.
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Old 11-15-2019, 05:19 PM   #12
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If it were me, I'd get two more of the Hercules tires mounted so you would have four identical on the road and inflate them to 75psi cold. Keep the two Marathons for spares.
^
X2.....I'm with slowrider, get all the same size....no fun on the side of road..
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Old 11-15-2019, 06:11 PM   #13
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You need to make sure your rims are rated for that much pressure, not a rims on these campers are rated for 80 PSI.
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Old 11-16-2019, 11:39 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by Lee Pedrick View Post
If it was me, I'd go by the pressure on the tire,,not maxed but close. Did you find out why the tires failed?
Repairman just thought possibly age. I think I might have picked up
something from the first stop.
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Old 11-19-2019, 08:54 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by 5picker View Post
Why not go with the inflation recommendations from the tire manufacturer for the load you are carrying on them?

Why does everyone try to turn this into rocket science?

The manufacturers have done all the engineering and testing to come up with the recommended inflation pressures at given loads. Why doesn't anyone want to use that? Why is what someone on a R/V forum suggests, better than that?
For many, your questions are valid, until they are compared with FMVSS (standards) and tire industry standards.

Tire manufacturers provide all the information necessary for the vehicle manufacturer to set recommended tire inflation pressures for your vehicle’s tires. It’s the sole responsibility of the vehicle manufacturer to do so for original equipment tires. No others have that responsibility.

The method used to set the initial recommended inflation pressures for any vehicle stay valid unless the vehicle’s GVWR is legally modified. This industry standard, written here in part, insures that; “Replacement tires MUST provide a load capacity equal to what the OE tires provided.” Remember, tire inflation pressures provide load capacity. Tire manufacturers provide load inflation charts to assist tire installers in establishing new tire inflation pressures for oversized replacement tires. (A load range increase has nothing to do with a tire’s designated size. It just gives it an option to provide more load capacity.)

All tires have a PSI rating printed on their sidewalls. It’s not a recommendation; it’s the amount of PSI necessary for the tire to provide its maximum load capacity, also displayed on the tire sidewall.
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Old 11-22-2019, 12:37 PM   #16
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TPMS are not intended or designed to warn of a belt separation that many call a "blowout".


I do wonder how many thought about how to proper program their TPMS for their personal conditions.


Also I bet none have ever run a test or check of their TPMS as I advised HERE.
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Old 11-22-2019, 12:48 PM   #17
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All tires have a PSI rating printed on their sidewalls. It’s not a recommendation; it’s the amount of PSI necessary for the tire to provide its maximum load capacity, also displayed on the tire sidewall.

Unfortunately too many feel that that number molded into the sidewall is the PROPER pressure for their tire even though the maximum load the tire will ever encounter, including safety margin, is a lot less than what the pressure is stated for.

Inflating a tire well beyond the pressure required to carry the ACTUAL load doesn't do the tire any favors. The harsher ride, potential for impact breaks, and irregular wear are common results of an over-inflated tire.
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Old 11-22-2019, 01:47 PM   #18
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Inflating a tire well beyond the pressure required to carry the ACTUAL load doesn't do the tire any favors. The harsher ride, potential for impact breaks, and irregular wear are common results of an over-inflated tire.
In your experience, what defines the, "ACTUAL load"?

Automotive industry tires have always been inflated to a value that allows for load capacity reserves.

RV trailer tires, for years, have needed load capacity reserves and with the new RVIA recommendation for 10% above GAWR they will now have it.

The USTMA says any tire found to have an inflation pressure 20% lower than what has been recommended by the vehicle manufacturer is to be considered in a run flat condition.
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Old 11-22-2019, 02:22 PM   #19
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In your experience, what defines the, "ACTUAL load"?
A scale has always worked for me. Anything else is at best just a guess.

I also know what my axles are rated for as well as what the manufacturer has "certified" the vehicle to carry.

If scale weight doesn't exceed the certified weight and axle rating, and leaves me adequate safety margin I see no real reason to inflate my tires to as much as 25% more than the pressure spec which was right in line with "guidelines".

What do I inflate my ties to? With ST 205/75-15 LRD Goodyear Endurance I use 55 psi for my cold inflation. Trailer scale weight is only 6300 lbs and axle rating is 7,000. Tires say the max is 65 psi but unneeded in my situation. Trailer tows nice and steady regardless of trucks passing or wind. Ride isn't so stiff the bottoms of the drawers inside aren't falling out either.


As for weighing, I am lucky and have a State Patrol Scale near my house on a secondary highway. about 8 minutes from my house and it's unmanned most of the time. The operators leave the scale readout visible from the door window so anyone who wants to weigh can do so even when unattended. I can weigh truck AND trailer, truck only, trailer only, Left side of trailer only, Right Side only, and also each axle although I have to weigh one axle first, back on so second axle is also on scale, then calculate the second axle's weight by subtracting first axle's weight from the total of both axle's weight. Since the scale is unattended I have plenty of time and best of all, it costs me nothing (I paid for it in my gas taxes though).

I do one more thing that seems to have been lost over the years. I take a piece of kid's sidewalk chalk, rub a band of it across the tread of my tire from a couple inches up the sidewall on both sides of the tire, then drive down the road as straight as possible (the street in front of my house works well too).

Only have to drive a few hundred feet and I avoid turning totally. When I look at the tire I only want to see black out to where the edge of the tread ends and the tire transitions to the sidewall. This means I am getting maximum tread contact with the road and if the pressure is at or above that stated on the certification sticker all is good. If the chalk isn't worn away out to the edge of the tread face that's a sign of an over-inflated tire.

Note: the above assumes a properly aligned axle as excessive camber error can alter the results (toe angle can too). If chalk is worn more on inner or outer side of tread then an alignment check is in order.

BF Goodrich used to teach this method to tire workers for years for all their tires from passenger, performance, and commercial truck tires. Today? Nobody wants to take the time.
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Old 11-22-2019, 03:15 PM   #20
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A scale has always worked for me. Anything else is at best just a guess.

I also know what my axles are rated for as well as what the manufacturer has "certified" the vehicle to carry.

If scale weight doesn't exceed the certified weight and axle rating, and leaves me adequate safety margin I see no real reason to inflate my tires to as much as 25% more than the pressure spec which was right in line with "guidelines".

What do I inflate my ties to? With ST 305/75-15 LRD Goodyear Endurance I use 55 psi for my cold inflation. Trailer scale weight is only 6300 lbs and axle rating is 7,000. Tires say the max is 65 psi but unneeded in my situation. Trailer tows nice and steady regardless of trucks passing or wind. Ride isn't so stiff the bottoms of the drawers inside aren't falling out either.


As for weighing, I am lucky and have a State Patrol Scale near my house on a secondary highway. about 8 minutes from my house and it's unmanned most of the time. The operators leave the scale readout visible from the door window so anyone who wants to weigh can do so even when unattended. I can weigh truck AND trailer, truck only, trailer only, Left side of trailer only, Right Side only, and also each axle although I have to weigh one axle first, back on so second axle is also on scale, then calculate the second axle's weight by subtracting first axle's weight from the total of both axle's weight. Since the scale is unattended I have plenty of time and best of all, it costs me nothing (I paid for it in my gas taxes though).

I do one more thing that seems to have been lost over the years. I take a piece of kid's sidewalk chalk, rub a band of it across the tread of my tire from a couple inches up the sidewall on both sides of the tire, then drive down the road as straight as possible (the street in front of my house works well too).

Only have to drive a few hundred feet and I avoid turning totally. When I look at the tire I only want to see black out to where the edge of the tread ends and the tire transitions to the sidewall. This means I am getting maximum tread contact with the road and if the pressure is at or above that stated on the certification sticker all is good. If the chalk isn't worn away out to the edge of the tread face that's a sign of an over-inflated tire.

Note: the above assumes a properly aligned axle as excessive camber error can alter the results (toe angle can too). If chalk is worn more on inner or outer side of tread then an alignment check is in order.

BF Goodrich used to teach this method to tire workers for years for all their tires from passenger, performance, and commercial truck tires. Today? Nobody wants to take the time.
You are combining FMCSA regulations with FMVSS standards. Either one is not applicable with the other.
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