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Old 03-27-2016, 12:00 AM   #1
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Axle Weight Rating Question

I have a 2016 Roo19 Hybrid with two Dexter Torflex axels in tandem. The trailer GVWR is approximately 4800 pounds. I had a question regarding the axel weight ratings. A Dexter representative told me my axels are Dexter #9 Torflex axels, each rated for 2200lbs. according to the manual. I'm confused because the GVWR is 4800 lbs. Can someone please explain to me why the trailer GVWR is 4800 lbs, but the sum of the axel ratings are only 4400lbs? Does the fact that the tow vehicle bears some of the trailer weight through the hitch have something to do with it?



Thanks in advance for the info. Fly Navy!!!
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Old 03-27-2016, 12:14 AM   #2
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You're truck carries the remaining portion. GVWR is generally defined at axles ratings + empty tongue weight.
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Old 03-27-2016, 02:57 PM   #3
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GAWR = The maximum permissible weight on an axle(s) when fully loaded.

FMVSS 571.110 paragraph S9.2; On RV trailers, the sum of the GAWRs of all axles on the vehicle plus the vehicle manufacturer's recommended tongue weight must not be less than the GVWR. If tongue weight is specified as a range, the minimum value must be used.

That information is standard for all RV trailers 10,000# (GVWR) or less.

It's important to remember that the GAWR is set by the vehicle manufacturer. The axle builder tags the axle with the maximum load capacity it was designed to support. So the proper place to look for your trailer's axle capacity is on the certification label or in the owner's manual for the trailer
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Old 03-27-2016, 04:16 PM   #4
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The link below is a long discussion on this subject. The answer is they design the trailer so the tow vehicle carries the remainder of the weight on the tongue.

Brand New Trailer - Axles Too Light for GVWR
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Old 03-27-2016, 04:49 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Too Tall View Post
The link below is a long discussion on this subject. The answer is they design the trailer so the tow vehicle carries the remainder of the weight on the tongue.

Brand New Trailer - Axles Too Light for GVWR
No matter how they design the trailer they MUST conform to the regulations and standards outlined in the FMVSS and certify that conformance.

It can be pondered it all day but the bottom line is the vehicle manufacturer has done their part.

Here is a verbatim quote from a NHTSA Q&A PDF file.

The FMVSS have requirements for the manufacturer to use proper tires and rims for the gross axle weight rating (GAWR) and the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). The manufacturer may determine the GVWR by adding cargo capacity (if any) to the curb weight of the vehicle as manufactured. The wise consumer, before purchase, will determine if the vehicle has sufficient cargo capacity to carry the weight of water, additional equipment (such as televisions, and microwave ovens), and luggage. The manufacturer’s certification label must show the GVWR. The GVWR must not be exceeded by overloading the vehicle. There is little the government can do to assist a consumer who has purchased a vehicle that has insufficient cargo capacity for its intended use.
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Old 03-27-2016, 06:01 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OK3wire View Post
I have a 2016 Roo19 Hybrid with two Dexter Torflex axels in tandem. The trailer GVWR is approximately 4800 pounds. I had a question regarding the axel weight ratings. A Dexter representative told me my axels are Dexter #9 Torflex axels, each rated for 2200lbs. according to the manual. I'm confused because the GVWR is 4800 lbs. Can someone please explain to me why the trailer GVWR is 4800 lbs, but the sum of the axel ratings are only 4400lbs? Does the fact that the tow vehicle bears some of the trailer weight through the hitch have something to do with it?



Thanks in advance for the info. Fly Navy!!!
I looked at the specs for your trailer. It currently shows a UVW (Unloaded Vehicle Weight) of 3654# that is the typical weight of the unit as manufactured at the factory. It includes all weight at the unit’s axle(s) and tongue or pin and LP Gas. The UVW does not include cargo, fresh potable water, additional optional equipment or dealer installed accessories.

The current cargo capacity is 1140#. When you add that to the GVW 3654 you get 4794# which should end up being the GVWR. From the 4794# you have to subtract the published hitch weight of 394# leaving 4400# to be carried by two 2200# GAWR axles. That’s the math the manufacturer must use on all RV trailers, GVW + CCC - hitch weight equals or exceeds GVWR. Any options the dealer installs will be deducted from the cargo label if the weight exceeds the regulations allowances.

http://www.forestriverinc.com/product-details.aspx?LineID=156&Image=5057&ModelID=959#Mai n
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Old 03-27-2016, 07:03 PM   #7
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My axles have a rating of like 3876 on the sticker derived from the math above. My axles are actually stamped 4K. Crawl under and look at the axles. They may be higher than the sticker.


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Old 03-27-2016, 08:15 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Airdale View Post
No matter how they design the trailer they MUST conform to the regulations and standards outlined in the FMVSS and certify that conformance.

It can be pondered it all day but the bottom line is the vehicle manufacturer has done their part.

Here is a verbatim quote from a NHTSA Q&A PDF file.

The FMVSS have requirements for the manufacturer to use proper tires and rims for the gross axle weight rating (GAWR) and the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). The manufacturer may determine the GVWR by adding cargo capacity (if any) to the curb weight of the vehicle as manufactured. The wise consumer, before purchase, will determine if the vehicle has sufficient cargo capacity to carry the weight of water, additional equipment (such as televisions, and microwave ovens), and luggage. The manufacturer’s certification label must show the GVWR. The GVWR must not be exceeded by overloading the vehicle. There is little the government can do to assist a consumer who has purchased a vehicle that has insufficient cargo capacity for its intended use.
Cool, I'm not questioning any of that, just referring the OP to the link that was all recently discussed for his reading pleasure.
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