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Old 08-12-2013, 08:32 PM   #11
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One of the reason ST tries are preferred is that the sidewall is designed for just that type of pressure in turns.

I worry more about my boat trailer tires. During summer months I will pull often several hundred miles in 100 degree heat to drop it directly in water. That sudden cool off has to be hard on the rubber compound.

Herk has posted some material that backs up my personal experience that many blowouts are caused by an impact to the tire breaking a cord. I specifically recall an impact about 200 mph before a blowout on a car hauler years ago.

With that said, I firmly believe the tires put on most travel trailers are the absolute cheapest available, and the lowest quality. We suffered a blowout in Eastern Colorado on a 9 month old trailer (tires were over a year by date code). I am pretty certain this was not impact damage. Compare that to my boat trailer - first set of tires replaced at 5 years, had around 11,000 miles on them, never a problem. Second set are 4 years now, only 6,000 miles (the cost of fuel really shut down a lot of travel) and still no problems.
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Old 08-20-2013, 06:10 PM   #12
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This past weekend we went to our favourite campsite about 80 kms (50 miles) south of here. About half way there we heard a loud pop sound, and since the highway was quite busy, I had to travel about a half mile before I found a spot to pull over. My worst fears were realized, a blowout on the rear passenger side tire, a complete hole about the size of a grapefruit on the inside tire sidewall . I check the pressure before every trip, 50 lbs, all seemed OK but the day was hot. The tire probably didn't have 2000 miles on them, load range C 6ply, but made in China and are the Forest River brand put on from the factory, Trail Express Power Touring. Luckily I had my ramps, so had it changed in about 20 minutes, my spare is much better than the running tires. This morning, I bought 4 new 10 ply load range E before we headed home from a local tire company in the town we were camping at. I was in and out in about 25 minutes, great service at a good price. The manager says he sells lots and hasn't had any complaints. My trailer is about 7200 lbs dry, the tires are rated to carry about 12,000 lbs, so I'll be really choked if one of these blows up.
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Old 08-20-2013, 06:29 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeeplj8 View Post
One of the reason ST tries are preferred is that the sidewall is designed for just that type of pressure in turns.

I worry more about my boat trailer tires. During summer months I will pull often several hundred miles in 100 degree heat to drop it directly in water. That sudden cool off has to be hard on the rubber compound.

Herk has posted some material that backs up my personal experience that many blowouts are caused by an impact to the tire breaking a cord. I specifically recall an impact about 200 mph before a blowout on a car hauler years ago.

With that said, I firmly believe the tires put on most travel trailers are the absolute cheapest available, and the lowest quality. We suffered a blowout in Eastern Colorado on a 9 month old trailer (tires were over a year by date code). I am pretty certain this was not impact damage. Compare that to my boat trailer - first set of tires replaced at 5 years, had around 11,000 miles on them, never a problem. Second set are 4 years now, only 6,000 miles (the cost of fuel really shut down a lot of travel) and still no problems.
Not to get off topic, but with the boat trailer example- always wait 15-20 minutes before you launch a boat after towing in warm temperatures. It's more to let the bearing cool than the tires. warm/hot bearings into cool/cold water is a recipe for changing bearings on the side of the highway. Just my .02
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Old 09-07-2013, 09:47 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by Windywest View Post
This past weekend we went to our favourite campsite about 80 kms (50 miles) south of here. About half way there we heard a loud pop sound, and since the highway was quite busy, I had to travel about a half mile before I found a spot to pull over. My worst fears were realized, a blowout on the rear passenger side tire, a complete hole about the size of a grapefruit on the inside tire sidewall . I check the pressure before every trip, 50 lbs, all seemed OK but the day was hot. The tire probably didn't have 2000 miles on them, load range C 6ply, but made in China and are the Forest River brand put on from the factory, Trail Express Power Touring. Luckily I had my ramps, so had it changed in about 20 minutes, my spare is much better than the running tires. This morning, I bought 4 new 10 ply load range E before we headed home from a local tire company in the town we were camping at. I was in and out in about 25 minutes, great service at a good price. The manager says he sells lots and hasn't had any complaints. My trailer is about 7200 lbs dry, the tires are rated to carry about 12,000 lbs, so I'll be really choked if one of these blows up.
You do realize your "10 ply" LR-E tires do not have 10 plies in the sidewall. There is a good possibility they have the same number of ply as a LR-D.

You might want to read your tire info. This post shows how.

Remember it is the air that carries the load not the tire.
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Old 09-07-2013, 11:23 AM   #15
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Hi Roger, over the past 2 weeks I've learned more about trailer tires than the average bear. I realize that I don't have 10 ply sidewalls, but I now have better tires than the ones that were originally on my trailer, to me that's what counts. Since I bought the trailer used, I have no idea what the previous owner ran over, ran into, or backed up to, but now I'm starting fresh from mile 1 with 4 new tires. I purchased a TPMS system, and have put this on my trailer so travelling should be relatively worry free. I have the tires pressured at 65 PSI, and I expect 65 to be adequate since my trailer is fairly light (7200 dry) and we don't carry a lot of water or extra stuff when we are on the road. 65 PSI is not the maximum of the tires, (80 is max) but as you say, it's the air that carries the load not the tire, and since my previous load range C tires were supposed to carry the load at 50 psi, I feel 65 will be great. One of my friends has a heavy trailer that came with LR E tires that he ran at 80psi. He had a flat, so went to LR G 14 ply on all 4 tires, but left the pressure at 80. He has put on probably 6000 miles over the past 2 years, and his tires are performing perfectly. To me, I just want a set of tires that I can "sort of" trust. None are perfect, all have their horror stories, but hopefully I have mitigated or minimized my issues, my fingers are crossed.
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Old 10-23-2013, 03:33 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Oakman View Post
Sometimes I wonder if backing into a site at a severe angle has more to do with blowouts than where the tire is made. Have you ever noticed how skewed out of shape a trailer tire becomes when backing at a very severe angle? Iíve seen some RVers back into sites and one tire on the front axle actually quits turning and is literally shoved sideways during the backing maneuver. This has to be tough on the sidewall and tread. You can see this at campgrounds with narrow roads and sites that are at a 90 degree angle to the road.
This extreme side loading is a function of the RV design and having tandem or triple axles. When turning a corner the tires try and center their rotation to point at the center of the radius they are rotating about. The problem is that the tires are all fighting each other and are generating significant inter-ply shear forces that is trying to tear the tire apart from the inside out. The "fix' for this is not inexpensive so don't hold your breath for the RV companies or axle mfg to make any effort along these lines.
The force is not really a problem in the sidewall but between the steel belts under the tread. The best thing you can do is to run the inflation molded on the sidewall of the tire that is associated with the tire maximum load. In the case of Goodyear Marathon tires you can run +10 psi above that inflation when setting the cold inflation.
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Old 10-23-2013, 03:41 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Brother Les View Post
Should never matter in going forward or 'backward'. the manufacturer puts on the sidewall, 'trailer tires' and the manufacturer should know very well what is done with a 'trailer' and build their product accordingly.

I have had 6/7 catastrophic blowouts. Sidewall blows out or the tread comes off. The damage amounts paid out by insurance for truck and trailers over the years would have bought me a new truck and trailer over that time.
Sidewall "blowouts" are usually run low flex failures.

Tread separation with the carcass retaining the air is a different failure mode with a different cause.
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