Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-25-2012, 05:01 PM   #21
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Bedford, IN
Posts: 41
The guys are right in saying that if a bearing is too hot to touch its too hot. A little info- you can't touch and hold hot metal @120 dg. and above. You can touch at 110 not easy but you can do it for a period of time. The bearing temp. will change with different conditions but still should be able to touch.
__________________

__________________
Chicken Legs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2012, 07:04 AM   #22
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 3,260
Take this for what it is worth, a few years ago I had lost a wheel bearing and had to replace the axle after I completed the work i spoke to a Tech at Alco who manufactured the axle and wheel assembly, he said it is normal for temp on the bearings to reach 180 degrees on the high end of the scale. If you ride the breaks the or in stop and go traffic the wheel assembly will stay hot. Remember, brakes on a camper are not self adjusting, I know the question is about bearings but this is just one thing that will effect temp on the wheels. When I re-pack my bearings I used RTV grease. In some cases depending on who did the bearing work if they tighten the nut down too tight it will cause the bearings to run hotter.
__________________

__________________
rockwood06 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2012, 03:00 PM   #23
Senior Member
 
gbpacker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Brookfield, WI
Posts: 192
After having my bearings re-packed by my dealer this spring I experienced a burning smell and very hot wheel hubs after a 50 mile trip. On the return trip we stopped at the dealer for an inspection.

Dealer told me that sometimes after bearing re-pack, the brake shoes drag, heating the brake drums and hubs. To correct the problem, I was advised to back the trailer and apply the trailer brakes with the manual control lever on the brake controller. This will force the brake shoes to rock backwards, unlocking the brake shoes.
__________________
gbpacker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2012, 04:34 PM   #24
DDC
Senior Member
 
DDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Komoka Ontario
Posts: 2,363
"" I was advised to back the trailer and apply the trailer brakes with the manual control lever on the brake controller. This will force the brake shoes to rock backwards, unlocking the brake shoes.""
I would stay away from this dealer they don't have a clue,I've been a mechanic for 40+ years and this statement is just pure wrong and based on stupidity.
__________________
"Well that didn't go as expected"
2015 Chev 2500HD Highcountry Duramax
Cedar Creek Silverback 33IK
Donald&Casey cairn terrier
Rest in Peace Mary my darling wife.
Scottish by birth Canadian by time.
DDC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2012, 04:51 PM   #25
Site Team - Lou
 
Herk7769's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: South Eastern PA
Posts: 21,169
Advice like that got me into the worst aircraft mishap of my career.

After several high gross weight assault landings with me in the command seat, we landed and switched pilots so my "copilot" who outranked me at the time, could get his landings in. Once the seat swap occurred, command of the aircraft switched to him.

We started to taxi out and the brakes would not release because they were hot. My advice to the new commander was to call the fire department and have them watch while they cooled enough to release.

He looked at me like I had horns on my head and told me that at his previous base in Texas, this happened all the time. They just advanced power to a higher power setting and they would "pop" free on their own.
I was VERY skeptical, but he was the boss. He did; and they did. A short taxi later using no brakes in order to let them further cool we took the runway.

At about 135 MPH, our aft right tire exploded and darn near destroyed the plane. Past our abort speed, we took the crippled plane into the air; circled while the fire department got ready; and landed right on centerline.

Dragging brakes are NO JOKE.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Martinsburg Class C Tire Failure.jpg
Views:	181
Size:	60.5 KB
ID:	15766   Click image for larger version

Name:	On the runway color.jpg
Views:	92
Size:	52.1 KB
ID:	15767   Click image for larger version

Name:	Tire Damage Color.jpg
Views:	118
Size:	56.7 KB
ID:	15768  
__________________

Lou and Laura with Bella - German Short Hair Pointer
2008 GMC Sierra 2500HD Crewcab SB Allison Duramax
2010 Flagstaff 8526RLWS - Superglide 3300
HAM CALLSIGN - KC3FFW
Herk7769 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2012, 06:50 PM   #26
COMer
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Erie, PA during summer
Posts: 9
You asked for specific temps. I check my trailer wheels at most rest stops and usually see temps in the 100 to 125 degrees. Depends on the highway temps and how hard I braked to come in. I am much less worried about exact temps as I am the range. If three are about 100 degrees and one is 150, I may well have a problem with the hotter one. I use a Harbor Freight laser temperature gun (about $25). Works well.
__________________
jbirrell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2012, 10:12 AM   #27
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 8
Great Information Thanks! But?

Thanks Guy's great information, but I'm sometimes not as clear as I need to be so let me try once more! Not your fault, mine.

Had tire failure, Cheap tires, replaced! Tried to service bearing on trailer! Could not, they are sealed bearings from the factory, bearing races and seals come as (1) one unit, pressed into hub. When you remove the nylon lock nut from the axle (NOTE: Not the normal Key type nut with cotter pin) the entire hub, drum and everything comes off! Could not repack the bearings at all. Of the four wheels I pulled three had very little grease at all in them!

Using High Temp grease and two fingers I tried to pack the inner and outer bearings inside the hubs before replacing them back on the axle. Replaced the big flat washer and nylon nut tighten the nut and then backed off 1/4 turn.

Now here is the issue and my question! These new nylon nuts have to be torqued down to between 180-200 ft-lbs. When the tire blew and I jacked the wheel up off the ground the entire hub moved 1/4 to 1/2" in all directions. The shop who replaced the tire advised me this new bearing is different and the hub nut needs to be torqued down. He checked all four wheel and the other three were also just as loose. Using an Impact gun he torqued the hub nuts down. When I returned home I used a torque wrench and set the torque on each hub at 180 ft-lbs. My hub temps with the temp gun shows between 95 to 120 degree's after about an hour on the Interstate. Is this about right or in the neighborhood? With your past replies it seems I'm Ok with bearing temperatures! Has anyone else had any experience with these type of bearings?

My vehicle mechanic advised most all new cars and trucks are coming equipped with this type of bearing assemble, but mine was the first time he had seen them used in trailers!!!

Just wanted to see if anyone had any experience with them or knew of a way to maybe extend their life by forcing grease into them! Because what I have seen when I pulled mine, you may get three years out of them and then you will be going to a machine shop to get the old ones pressed out and new ones pressed in! If you are lucky and don't burn an axle up first!

Once again sorry for the confusion, I'm new to these forums and know all of your time is valuable. But be aware these things are out there!

Be safe and Thanks to all!
__________________
2011 Powerstroke-Wildcat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2012, 10:35 AM   #28
DDC
Senior Member
 
DDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Komoka Ontario
Posts: 2,363
Just pack as much grease as you can into them and keep them torqued there should be no play or looseness in these bearings they will not last as long as tapered bearings thats why the automotive switched "cheaper".
__________________
"Well that didn't go as expected"
2015 Chev 2500HD Highcountry Duramax
Cedar Creek Silverback 33IK
Donald&Casey cairn terrier
Rest in Peace Mary my darling wife.
Scottish by birth Canadian by time.
DDC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2012, 10:55 AM   #29
Senior Member
 
prof_fate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Beaver, PA
Posts: 911
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbirrell View Post
You asked for specific temps. I check my trailer wheels at most rest stops and usually see temps in the 100 to 125 degrees. Depends on the highway temps and how hard I braked to come in. I am much less worried about exact temps as I am the range. If three are about 100 degrees and one is 150, I may well have a problem with the hotter one. I use a Harbor Freight laser temperature gun (about $25). Works well.
WHile I don't have such a guage (been tempted..) last check I had the same thing - one hotter than the others (measured by touch). The TT is at the campground for a month or so and I'll check the temps again on the ride home next month - could be a slightly tighter brake adj or bearing adj or grease issue, or just a random issue.

Do you ever measure tire temps? Can this identify a more loaded side/tire? A low air pressure tire?
__________________
Chris, Wills (16) Evie (13) & Toby our collie (6)
2011 Grey Wolf 28BH
2013 Chevy K1500 Crew w/ Reese StraitLine Dual Cam

Nights camped 2011: 11 2012: 18 2013: 12 2014: 12 2015: 13 2016: 56 2017: 8+
prof_fate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2012, 11:03 AM   #30
Senior Member
 
prof_fate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Beaver, PA
Posts: 911
Hadn't heard of them used on trailers, but I guess it was inevitable. They are WAY better than the old tapered roller bearings.
They don't need greased - every front wheel drive car I've seen for then past 20+ years have them in the front and there is no way to grease them - and they'll last 100, 150, 200,000 miles no problem.

Again, they're sealed - dirt is the enemy more than grease being their friend.


Quote:
Originally Posted by 2011 Powerstroke-Wildcat View Post
Just wanted to see if anyone had any experience with them or knew of a way to maybe extend their life by forcing grease into them! Because what I have seen when I pulled mine, you may get three years out of them and then you will be going to a machine shop to get the old ones pressed out and new ones pressed in! If you are lucky and don't burn an axle up first!

Once again sorry for the confusion, I'm new to these forums and know all of your time is valuable. But be aware these things are out there!

Be safe and Thanks to all!
__________________

__________________
Chris, Wills (16) Evie (13) & Toby our collie (6)
2011 Grey Wolf 28BH
2013 Chevy K1500 Crew w/ Reese StraitLine Dual Cam

Nights camped 2011: 11 2012: 18 2013: 12 2014: 12 2015: 13 2016: 56 2017: 8+
prof_fate is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
bearings, led pad

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:59 PM.