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Old 06-27-2012, 01:09 PM   #31
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Thanks to all who replied, and to DDC for the advice. Just wanted to let everyone know about the change in the bearings. Through me for a loop when I pulled the dust cover and seen the nylon nut and not a castle nut! And to HERK7769, WOO and I thought I was have a bad day with a tire blow-out! Look forward to conversing in the future! Be safe and thanks.
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Old 06-27-2012, 01:43 PM   #32
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I suspect that any reference above to nylon nuts should actually be called NyLOCK nuts. They are still steel nuts, but have a small plastic insert to act as a thread locking device.

I'm going to then assume that the O/P's trailer has sealed-type hubs. I, too, have not seen them used in trailer service, but new stuff happens every day.

The front hubs on my 4WD F-350 are of the sealed, lubed-for-life type, too. "Life" is not MY life, nor the truck's life, just the bearing's life. It could be extended considerably if they could be lubed in a conventional way.

We have found a way to do this on our trucks by removing the ABS sensor and pumping the cavity almost full of a quality GC-LB #2 lithium-complex grease. I use Delo Grease.

I have 209,000 miles on one of mine (the other one failed at ~120,000 before we started lubing them), and there's not a hint of looseness. Many others obtain similar results.

I suspect that sealed hubs are easier for an OEM to deal with, but in the long run more costly to the end user. They are also a boon to the bearing manufacturer's sales figures.

If/when I someday end up with a trailer with sealed hubs, I will figure out a way to get the lubricant occasionally replenished.

Who knows, by then there may be ABS mandated on travel trailers!

Pop
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Old 06-27-2012, 02:08 PM   #33
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sealed bearings (and ujoints, tie rod ends/ball joints) last longer than a greasable one and incur no maintence costs. For the overwhelming majority of people this is way better than having to have things lubed (and not having something skipped, over-lubed with grease blowing a seal letting in dirt/moisture). And with wheel bearings of the old type they'd often be pulled part for brake work or other 'inspections' enabling contamination (or the customer would be advised- and charged-for bearing repack).

I don't recall many wheel bearings of the old type lasting 80k miles let alone more. My last taurus got them at 135k, current one got one at 110k the other is still good, my windstar is at 108 with the original bearings and no issues (inspected last week). My expy has 236k on the original bearings.

Having been a tech in the early 80s then working as a service advisor/manager in the early 2000s I can attest there is world of improvement in almost every aspect of cars today, wheel bearing included.

Like so many I know that complained about electronic ignition, how expensive it was to replace when it failed. Do you remember points? Remember needing a tune up every 10 to 12k miles? Remember having condensation get into the cap and having wet points and needing a tow? When was the last time you had a tune up?
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Old 06-27-2012, 02:16 PM   #34
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sealed bearings (and ujoints, tie rod ends/ball joints) last longer than a greasable one and incur no maintence costs. For the overwhelming majority of people this is way better than having to have things lubed (and not having something skipped, over-lubed with grease blowing a seal letting in dirt/moisture). And with wheel bearings of the old type they'd often be pulled part for brake work or other 'inspections' enabling contamination (or the customer would be advised- and charged-for bearing repack).

I don't recall many wheel bearings of the old type lasting 80k miles let alone more. My last taurus got them at 135k, current one got one at 110k the other is still good, my windstar is at 108 with the original bearings and no issues (inspected last week). My expy has 236k on the original bearings.

Having been a tech in the early 80s then working as a service advisor/manager in the early 2000s I can attest there is world of improvement in almost every aspect of cars today, wheel bearing included.

Like so many I know that complained about electronic ignition, how expensive it was to replace when it failed. Do you remember points? Remember needing a tune up every 10 to 12k miles? Remember having condensation get into the cap and having wet points and needing a tow? When was the last time you had a tune up?
Definitely agree with the electronic ignitions being much better, but in all my driving since 1955, have never had to replace a front wheel bearing although I have had to replace a couple of rear axle bearings that were sealed on one side. I prefer the tapered roller brgs for the front wheels on rear wheel drive cars.
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Old 06-27-2012, 02:25 PM   #35
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Pop you assumed right, was not sure of have to spell the correct name. Thanks for the help. I just forced as much grease as I could between the inter and outer bearing as I could. There seemed to be a gap of about 3/8 to 1/2 inch between them. Then I slid the hub back into the axle packed a little more on the outside, then replaced the flat washer and Nylock nut back on. Just did torque the nut like I should until I spoke to the mechanic and found the info on Lippert Components Web site. They are called SBS (Sealed Bearing System). Thanks for the help and Info.
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Old 06-27-2012, 02:55 PM   #36
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Not to change the subject, but I love those Springers, Cockers and Brittanys .

Beautiful dog POP
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Old 06-27-2012, 02:59 PM   #37
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Grease in not all the same - some kinds are not compatible with one another. Make sure what whatever type you added is the right 'base' as what was in there or you can cause more problems than you're trying to solve.
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Old 06-27-2012, 04:09 PM   #38
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Grease in not all the same - some kinds are not compatible with one another. Make sure what whatever type you added is the right 'base' as what was in there or you can cause more problems than you're trying to solve.
The Professor is sure right about grease compatability! If you are going to re-grease serviceable bearings you are well-advised to completely clean all the old lubricant from the bearings to ensure you only have one thickener type, and not a mix. Ford (actually Timken) uses Mobil Infinitec 152, which is lithium-complex based, so I know we can use Delo. Here is a chart of thickener compatability.

I do not agree with him, however, at the assertion that newer, non-servicable, bearings will last longer due to no moisture or dust incursion. As long as conventional bearings are properly maintained, they last a very-long time indeed. Of course, the key is maintenance, and if you don't wish to do it, you pay the price. The Professor rightly called the maintenance schedule for the "overwhelming majority", i.e. run it 'till it breaks then replace it. That works, but it's just usually more costly and time-consuming that way. I prefer to do maintenance on MY schedule, not (pardon the pun) fate's.

A complete cleaning in some kind of solvent (I use diesel fuel) is a good idea to enable you to carefully inspect the rollers and cones for any wear or pitting. It occasionally happens, and I encountered it just last month on an outer.

When spotless, besides a visual inspection, I usually run the dry roller assembly against the cone and feel for even the slightest irregularity. If it doesn't run completely smooth all the way around for a few turns, it gets replaced!

Maybe that pitted bearing would have made it the mere 200 miles that we were going, but I don't make it a habit of finding myself along the side of the road, either, and do what I can to prevent it from happening.

Sealed units may be the wave of the future, but I think we're going to see more roadside hub failures as a result.

YMMV

Pop
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Old 06-27-2012, 04:19 PM   #39
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Not to change the subject, but I love those Springers, Cockers and Brittanys .

Beautiful dog POP
His name is Buddy, and he can be found here:

Now, back to our regularly-scheduled discussion on bearings and hub over-heating problems.

Pop
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Old 07-15-2012, 10:08 PM   #40
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run with hub covers?

Looks like I found the right thread.
I just finished checking brakes & bearings, reset the bearings according to instructions here, adjusted the brakes, and replaced all 4 tires...this in prep for our 2 week trip, leaving next weekend. I did the 20 ft-lb, back off, 7 ft-lb, install pin procedure. If in doubt, I backed off to avoid high temps.

I just took a test drive...only about 10 miles. All 4 hubs felt the same...too hot to touch for more than 1 second. But, I was adjusting the Prodigy brake controller on my way back into the subdivision. Plenty of full manual stops. I'm driving it again tomorrow on the way to work, and will check again with normal driving (light on the brakes).

1. Can fiddling with the brakes make the hub shaft too hot to touch?
2. Thinking about getting a IR temp gun at Harbor Freight. My camper has the little plastic hub caps. Do you guys run without any caps, so you can get temps right on the cast hubs?
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