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Old 02-06-2016, 06:19 PM   #21
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Trailer King load range E are rated for 75 mph...
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Old 02-06-2016, 08:44 PM   #22
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The linked article was very interesting and informative. However, claims that ST tires are more robust than LT tires are comparing apples to oranges. Sure, an ST may be stronger than an identically sized LT but you'll have a hard time finding a 15 inch LT.

The claims that one has to have ST because LT does not require as much side load capacity seem suspicious. A trailer tire should experience minimally more side load than a truck tire experiences, but it does not experience the loads caused by acceleration. What difference does it make if one has a, i.e., ST225/75R15 rated at 2,500 pounds or a LT225/70R16 also rated at 2,500 pounds mounted on the trailer. Both of those tires have an 8.9 inch tread width but the 16 incher is 1/10 of an inch taller...insignificant. The important thing is that either tire used must have an adequate (actually, much more than adequate) weight limit.

I'm not sure of the reasoning behind Goodyears statement about wider not being better for a trailer tire, but I'll defer to their expertise and accept that.

Now...consider hydroplaning. Here's where the LT tire shines. Most LT tires (not all, but most) are inflated to 80 psi. Most ST tires (again, not all but most) are inflated to 65 psi. Based on ⅛ inch of standing water, the basic rule is that hydroplaning occurs at a speed which equals nine times the square root of the pressure. For an 80 psi tire that is 80 mph and for a 65 psi tire that is 72 mph. The Goodyear 614 at 110 psi has a basic hydroplaning speed of 94 mph. And, an E-rated 10 ply ST tire uses 80 psi so it becomes equal to the LT.

Don't take those numbers as an operating limit (or goal) because they can change a lot with ľ inch of water, oil mixed with water, etc etc.
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Old 02-06-2016, 09:05 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by emm-dee View Post
The linked article was very interesting and informative. However, claims that ST tires are more robust than LT tires are comparing apples to oranges. Sure, an ST may be stronger than an identically sized LT but you'll have a hard time finding a 15 inch LT.

The claims that one has to have ST because LT does not require as much side load capacity seem suspicious. A trailer tire should experience minimally more side load than a truck tire experiences, but it does not experience the loads caused by acceleration. What difference does it make if one has a, i.e., ST225/75R15 rated at 2,500 pounds or a LT225/70R16 also rated at 2,500 pounds mounted on the trailer. Both of those tires have an 8.9 inch tread width but the 16 incher is 1/10 of an inch taller...insignificant. The important thing is that either tire used must have an adequate (actually, much more than adequate) weight limit.

I'm not sure of the reasoning behind Goodyears statement about wider not being better for a trailer tire, but I'll defer to their expertise and accept that.

Now...consider hydroplaning. Here's where the LT tire shines. Most LT tires (not all, but most) are inflated to 80 psi. Most ST tires (again, not all but most) are inflated to 65 psi. Based on ⅛ inch of standing water, the basic rule is that hydroplaning occurs at a speed which equals nine times the square root of the pressure. For an 80 psi tire that is 80 mph and for a 65 psi tire that is 72 mph. The Goodyear 614 at 110 psi has a basic hydroplaning speed of 94 mph. And, an E-rated 10 ply ST tire uses 80 psi so it becomes equal to the LT.

Don't take those numbers as an operating limit (or goal) because they can change a lot with ľ inch of water, oil mixed with water, etc etc.


Just askin why would it be hard to find an LT in a 15 inch that is / was the most common size of Light truck tires????????. and as I mentioned why does Goodyear recommend ST or trailer rated tires on trailers and most reputable tire dealers refuse to put Light Truck tires on trailers .

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Old 02-06-2016, 09:10 PM   #24
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Just askin why would it be hard to find an LT in a 15 inch that is / was the most common size of Light truck tires????????. and as I mentioned why does Goodyear recommend ST or trailer rated tires on trailers and most reputable tire dealer refuse to put Light Truck tires on trailers .

I've checked the Michelin, BFG, Goodyear, Firestone/Bridgestone, etc, and other reputable (read non-chinese tire builders) and can only find LT in 16 inch or larger. The 15 inch 10-ply tires seem to only be available as ST tires.
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Old 02-06-2016, 09:21 PM   #25
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I've checked the Michelin, BFG, Goodyear, Firestone/Bridgestone, etc, and other reputable (read non-chinese tire builders) and can only find LT in 16 inch or larger. The 15 inch 10-ply tires seem to only be available as ST tires.

I used 15" LT tires on all my F150s maybe I misunderstood you You didn't say you were talking about 10 ply tires. LT 15s Tires are made by most of the manufacturers Goodyear, BF Goodrich and the others .

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Old 02-06-2016, 09:31 PM   #26
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I used 15" LT tires on all my F150s maybe I misunderstood you You didn't say you were talking about 10 ply tires. LT 15s Tires are made by most of the manufacturers Goodyear, BF Goodrich and the others .

I probably wasn't clear. I just associate an LT tire with being a 10 ply tire. I also wasn't aware that any pickup truck was equipped with anything less than a 16 inch tire.
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Old 02-06-2016, 09:54 PM   #27
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I probably wasn't clear. I just associate an LT tire with being a 10 ply tire. I also wasn't aware that any pickup truck was equipped with anything less than a 16 inch tire.
All the F150s and others had 15 in tires up through the 90s and maybe early 2000s. Can't afford new trucks so have no idea when they went to 16s

Back in the 90s there were big issues with Ford Dodge and Chey 3/4 and 1 tons some ran 16s some ran 16 1/2s and there were big issues making sure the 16.5in tires did not get on the 16 in rims

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Old 02-06-2016, 10:25 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by emm-dee View Post
The linked article was very interesting and informative. However, claims that ST tires are more robust than LT tires are comparing apples to oranges. Sure, an ST may be stronger than an identically sized LT but you'll have a hard time finding a 15 inch LT.

The claims that one has to have ST because LT does not require as much side load capacity seem suspicious. A trailer tire should experience minimally more side load than a truck tire experiences, but it does not experience the loads caused by acceleration. What difference does it make if one has a, i.e., ST225/75R15 rated at 2,500 pounds or a LT225/70R16 also rated at 2,500 pounds mounted on the trailer. Both of those tires have an 8.9 inch tread width but the 16 incher is 1/10 of an inch taller...insignificant. The important thing is that either tire used must have an adequate (actually, much more than adequate) weight limit.

I'm not sure of the reasoning behind Goodyears statement about wider not being better for a trailer tire, but I'll defer to their expertise and accept that.

Now...consider hydroplaning. Here's where the LT tire shines. Most LT tires (not all, but most) are inflated to 80 psi. Most ST tires (again, not all but most) are inflated to 65 psi. Based on ⅛ inch of standing water, the basic rule is that hydroplaning occurs at a speed which equals nine times the square root of the pressure. For an 80 psi tire that is 80 mph and for a 65 psi tire that is 72 mph. The Goodyear 614 at 110 psi has a basic hydroplaning speed of 94 mph. And, an E-rated 10 ply ST tire uses 80 psi so it becomes equal to the LT.

Don't take those numbers as an operating limit (or goal) because they can change a lot with ľ inch of water, oil mixed with water, etc etc.
Good info emm-dee, but if you are traveling at 70mph towing your trailer when there is any chance of hydroplaning, you had better slow down!
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Old 02-06-2016, 10:30 PM   #29
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Good info emm-dee, but if you are traveling at 70mph towing your trailer when there is any chance of hydroplaning, you had better slow down!
Oh yes, I completely agree. Although I'm new to the travel trailer thing, I have decades of experience towing pretty heavy horse trailers which taught me that anything faster than 60-65 is just not worth the stress that comes with that. (I guess since most of my horse trailer had full living quarters they qualify as an RV).
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Old 02-06-2016, 10:39 PM   #30
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Do they really?
ST tires are load and speed rated to only 65 MPH
LT tires generally are speed and load rated at 99 MPH.
Which is better?

I'm not arguing "better" - I'm stating that the tires should be used within their stated specs. Look at the specs and you'll find that LT tires in equivalent sizes to ST tires have less stated carrying capacity.
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