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Old 04-04-2011, 06:36 PM   #1
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Nail in trailer tire

I picked up a nail in one of my tires as I was pulling my camper to the farm for spring Turkey season. I noticed the hissing as I was setting up.
The tire was not flat yet so I think I picked it up pretty close to the farm.
It took it another hour to go flat.

My question is
Can It be patched just like a conventional tire?
If so can I patch it in place and just re-inflate?

Would it be better to mount the spare to be safe? (I have never had to change a tire on a tandem before)

I am ready to buy new tires but I would like to pull the camper to the tire shop and let them do it (50 miles).

Thanks in advance.
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Old 04-04-2011, 06:53 PM   #2
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My answer is:

Can It be patched just like a conventional tire? Not Recommended

If so can I patch it in place and just re-inflate? Not Recommended

Would it be better to mount the spare to be safe? (I have never had to change a tire on a tandem before) HIGHLY Recommended

Easy to do. Just support the frame. You need a jack capable of lifting 1/2 the camper's weight. Both wheels will be off the ground by the time you get the bad tire high enough to put the spare on.

I am ready to buy new tires but I would like to pull the camper to the tire shop and let them do it (50 miles).

Do it on the spare. Keep the best of your old tires as a spare. (It may be your current spare as it will have been covered its whole life and have the least mileage on it.)
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Old 04-04-2011, 07:32 PM   #3
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When I got my first flat on my TT, I traded it in on a 5th wheel!

Well, seriously, it just happened to coincide with the time I traded it in.

Oh, and I think Herk has you pretty well covered!
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Old 04-05-2011, 05:50 AM   #4
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I think it would be best to put the spare tire on, if the nail is in the tread are have the tire pulled from the rim and patch it from the inside, if the nail entered the side wall of the tire then replace the tire....For one reason or another i just done like plugged tires, I just think that this is the safest way to go.
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Old 04-05-2011, 11:46 AM   #5
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Someone certainly correct me if I'm wrong, but I think I once came across some nifty looking devices that would be great for tandem axle trailers, such as using a ramp or a rocker to push or pull the non-flat tire(or axle) off of the ground, and thus also elevating the the wheel that needs the work to be done. Sure would beat wrestling with a jack. I'll have to see if I can find a link for what I saw.
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Old 04-05-2011, 12:05 PM   #6
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i just use my 2x8's that I level the trailer with. I drive only the good tire on them. I got my first flat in my driveway (had the trailer about 2 days), turned out the bead needed to be seated.
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Old 04-05-2011, 12:08 PM   #7
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Jiffy Jack;* HitchesOnline.com Here's one example
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Old 04-05-2011, 12:48 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyinguy68 View Post
Someone certainly correct me if I'm wrong, but I think I once came across some nifty looking devices that would be great for tandem axle trailers, such as using a ramp or a rocker to push or pull the non-flat tire(or axle) off of the ground, and thus also elevating the the wheel that needs the work to be done. Sure would beat wrestling with a jack. I'll have to see if I can find a link for what I saw.
This is the one I have; EZ Trailer Jack and Wheel Chock Blaylock Industries Trailer Jack,Wheel Chocks EZ-JACK
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Old 04-05-2011, 12:51 PM   #9
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I just used a 4X4 (maybe a 4X6), and drove one wheel up on it. Much easier than a jack.
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Old 04-05-2011, 01:07 PM   #10
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There is nothing wrong with using plugs.......as long as you use the right ones. You have to get the expensive "self-vulcanizing" plugs. The Black Jack brand is the best I have found.

I have used the good plugs for 15 years now and have never had one leak or fall out. I have used them on everything from car tires to our tractor tires and not one problem. The tires will wear out and be replaced before the plug does. I couldn't even tell you when the last time was I paid somebody to fix a tire. I have a compressor with me at all times so tire repair takes me about 10 minutes and we are back up and running.

Obviously if it is in the side wall, the tire needs to be replaced for your safety. You can use plugs in the sidewall to get you were you need to go, but I wouldn't for a permanent sidewall fix.
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