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Old 10-18-2012, 02:49 PM   #1
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Nitrogen in tires, again!

Hi folks, a couple of years ago got into a discussion about nitrogen in tires. Someone wanted to get technical on me.
I will say this, we put the Michelin 10-ply's on at 81,000 miles and just replaced them at 176,000. That's 95,000 on that set and they were still just barely legal. I run nitrogen and 50PSI in them.
They were more than 5 years old with no cracking!
Jack
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Old 10-18-2012, 03:01 PM   #2
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Jack, I am currently in the process of upgrading to Michelin 10 ply tires and was wondering about the best air pressure to use both towing, trailer weighs 9500 lbs with a pin weight of 1700 lbs, and when empty. You state that you run 50 PSI, is that towing, empty or both.
Thanks
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Old 10-18-2012, 03:17 PM   #3
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I think the type of driving, proper inflation, and rotation have much more to do with tire longevity than what they are filled with.

I have gotten 80K plus from BFG's, Hankooks and even a set of Kunmho's. Some of those were standard passenger tires on my cars.
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Old 10-18-2012, 03:18 PM   #4
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I run 50PSI year round.
Make sure they put the high pressure stems in the wheel, I had two of the regular ones fail during the five years they were on the truck.
Jack
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Old 10-18-2012, 03:21 PM   #5
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Jeepij8, big difference in cars and a 6,000 pound pick up.
And I drive city, highway, mountains, the whole thing.
Which begs the question from the diesel owners, how many miles average on a set of tires?
Jack
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Old 10-18-2012, 03:24 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jackhartjr View Post
Jeepij8, big difference in cars and a 6,000 pound pick up.
And I drive city, highway, mountains, the whole thing.
Which begs the question from the diesel owners, how many miles average on a set of tires?
Jack
first set of BFG long trails on my 05 Ram 2500 CTD were replaced at 98k. I generally find that load range e tries will wear better than passenger tires. However got 84K out of a set of Hankook's on a Magnum.

My current diesel only has 40K on the current set of Hankooks, but I expect they will make at least 80K.
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Old 10-18-2012, 03:31 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeeplj8 View Post
I think the type of driving, proper inflation, and rotation have much more to do with tire longevity than what they are filled with...
X2, makes absolutely no difference what is inside the tire as far as air or nitrogen. Keeping the correct pressure and alignment is what counts.
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Old 10-18-2012, 07:08 PM   #8
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Normal air is about 70% nitrogen anyway so why pay all that extra for a couple of % more???
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Old 10-18-2012, 07:38 PM   #9
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chemistry

Nitrogen is an inert gas whereas oxygen is a reactive gas, specifically it is an oxidizer and can cause compounds to change into something other than the original compound with its original properties. Iron oxide (a.k.a. rust) is a prime example.
I would also think the nitrogen used to fill tires is much drier than ambient air compressed and pump into tires. There are water separators on most good pump systems but they do little to extract water vapor from the ambient air.
I don't know how much longer the inside of a tire will last being filled with dry nitrogen vice wet oxygen, but I have to agree with the folks that say this has no effect on the wear and tear on the outside. Proper pressure, alignment, balance, rotation, and avoiding UV and curb damage to the sidewalls is the key.
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Old 10-18-2012, 07:49 PM   #10
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X2, makes absolutely no difference what is inside the tire as far as air or nitrogen. Keeping the correct pressure and alignment is what counts.
Well, I'll agree and disagree.

I will agree that nitrogen or air makes no difference to the rubber itself.

Where nitrogen makes a difference in how many miles is in that it keeps the pressure longer and is more consistent.

Given most drivers penchant to ignore tire pressures for long periods of time (if they ever check it at all), nitrogen enable the tire to run longer by maintaining pressure and reducing under-inflation tire wear and heat build up....

Nitrogen in tires is kind of like "fool proofing" them against under inflation. Well, for a longer time that is....

We use nitrogen in aircraft tires but that is because it is an inert gas and if you have a brake fire all you have to worry about is the pressure blow out instead of adding a jet of combustible air from the blow out plugs....
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