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Old 12-05-2011, 01:08 PM   #11
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It sure makes them tires look good though.
It sure does.

I thought I had posted here before about "blooming", but may not have. Here is a copy of what I posted in the TrailManor trailer forums that Mtnguy and I frequent. It may help explain it better for everyone......or bore them to death.

Vehicles which are parked for extended periods often experience tire sidewall deterioration. Sometimes called tire dry-rot, these sidewalls literally dry, check and eventually crack and split. Each year the loss for RVers, trailer boaters and owners of classic cars adds up to millions of dollars. This article examines this problem.

Tires today commonly contain chemical ingredients which lessen damage from ozone and ultraviolet light, the main environmental enemies of tires. Ozone is an odorless gas, which some people call the electric train smell. Although it is more concentrated in cities and manufacturing centers, ozone is a normal part of the air we breathe everywhere. When combined with ultraviolet (UV) light, ozone causes rubber to dry and become brittle and results in tire sidewall deterioration.

Black Tires

To protect rubber against UV damage is why tires are black. Tire makers use a common type of UV stabilizer called a competitive absorber. Competitive absorbers capture and absorb the UV light instead of the tire's rubber. Carbon black, a very cheap ingredient, is used as a competitive absorber whereas, all other UV stabilizers are extremely expensive. This is why tires are black.

UV stabilizers are called sacrificial, meaning they are gradually used up and reach a point where they can no longer protect the tire against UV damage. As carbon black loses its ability to do this job, it turns gray, which explains why tires appear gray as the get older.

Ozone Protection

Waxes are used to protect tires against ozone. When tires are being driven they flex. This flexing causes the protective waxes to move to the surface where they form a physical barrier between the air --which contains ozone and oxygen-- and the tire polymer. This is called blooming.

When tires are not regularly used, such as a parked RV, boat trailer, classic car, spares, this blooming does not happen. Ozone then starts eating away the protective wax and before long reaches the tire polymer. Often by this time, the surface carbon black has lost its ability to protect against UV. With UV light and ozone working together, deterioration starts. The tire dries, checks, and will eventually crack.

Other Degradants

Petrochemicals and silicone oils can also remove protective waxes and increase the rate of decay. Common automotive protectants and tire dressings can contain chemicals and/or silicone oils which dissolve protective waxes and can actually attack the sidewalls. In the event of failure, one of the first things tire manufacturers look for is evidence of the use of these types of products. If it is found it may be a cause for invalidating a warrant against manufacturing defects.


Here is a link to a Michelin site for rv tires. You can click on the pdf motorhome article on the bottom-left of the page, and kinda read their take on using (or not using) tire dressing products.

Welcome to Michelin North America RV Website
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Old 12-05-2011, 01:17 PM   #12
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My take away from this is to run tires on some level surface such as wood or plastic and use tire covers to protect from harmful UV rays. I am 1/2 way there. Gotta get me some of those tire covers. Thanks for the info and the article.
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Old 12-06-2011, 08:34 AM   #13
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My take away from this is to run tires on some level surface such as wood or plastic and use tire covers to protect from harmful UV rays. I am 1/2 way there. Gotta get me some of those tire covers. Thanks for the info and the article.
Sounds like you got it down pat.

About twice a year, I take my truck down to a full service car wash and mini-detail shop. I always have to tell them NOT to put anything on my tires.........which just messes their head all up.

It's actually good for my business that they do mess up other people's tires.......just not my own that I have to buy. Maybe I am sharing too much info with everyone. LOL
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Old 12-06-2011, 11:12 AM   #14
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I usually find this to be a good method.
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Old 12-06-2011, 11:45 AM   #15
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I usually find this to be a good method.
lol if i could do that i would!
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Old 12-06-2011, 12:02 PM   #16
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Don't know how true it is (maybe put out by turtle wax) but I have heard rumors that Armor-All can get between the tire bead and wheel and cause the tire to go flat. Wayne
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