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Old 05-20-2014, 10:42 PM   #11
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Here is the procedure to check if your clutch fan is operating at proper efficiency. You will need two persons to do this simple check.

Start the engine and observe the clutch fan operating. (it's spinning)

While you are observing the rotating fan, have the second person shut off the engine.

The clutch fan should spin, no more than one to two and a half complete revolutions, before coming to a complete stop.

If your fan continues to free spin for more revolutions than specified, after shut off, your clutch fan is not operating within design perameters, and needs to be replaced.

The fan needs to pull enough air past the radiator to properly cool the coolant when it circulates through the radiator.



Let us know how this test turns out.

My fan is concealed behind the radiator; so, I'll try this in the AM when I can crawl under the engine and observe the fan directly. Unless you think I can judge by sound or the breeze coming out the back.
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Old 05-20-2014, 10:50 PM   #12
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Unfortunately not. You need to observe the rotations. At least you will know if that is the problem, and can then deal from a position of authority, with your repair shop.
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Old 05-20-2014, 10:52 PM   #13
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Oh, and continued operation of your engine beyond normal operating temperature for repeated cycles, WILL cause serious engine damage, including but not limited too, head warpage, head gasket failure etc.

My mechanic said stop before 230F. What do you think?
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Old 05-20-2014, 10:58 PM   #14
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My mechanic said stop before 230F. What do you think?
I suspect that high temp indication is just that, false indication. As you describe the engine cools quickly without the water pump running! Impossible if truly overheated. Do you carry a IR thermometer? Chose a spot and record the temp on the block. If over heated it will show an increase at that spot.
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Old 05-20-2014, 11:19 PM   #15
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Unless your moving it to get it to a safe spot to park it, You shouldn't drive it. Mechanics who say its ok to use the graduated dash gauge, I assume thats on the dash for temperature, that is telling you 230 degrees, is not in your best interest. Can't remember what coolants' boiling point is under pressure, but I do know water boils at 212 degrees, at STP ( stand temperature pressure) Not good.
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Old 05-20-2014, 11:21 PM   #16
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I suspect that high temp indication is just that, false indication. As you describe the engine cools quickly without the water pump running! Impossible if truly overheated. Do you carry a IR thermometer? Chose a spot and record the temp on the block. If over heated it will show an increase at that spot.

Sorry if I was unclear, but I do not suspect that the water pump is not running. I think the fan might not come on when it should.
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Old 05-20-2014, 11:32 PM   #17
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Sorry if I was unclear, but I do not suspect that the water pump is not running. I think the fan might not come on when it should.
I understand the water pump is operable, but you indicated you come off the highway and shut it down, no pump. I agree with your first post, the electronics of the fan are goofy, but that's another reason to believe the temp is off. BTW I don't have steam tables with me. The table will indicate if you contain water in a pressure cooker or boiler, the temp needed to boil rises with pressure. IE a 15 psi radiator cap will raise the temp of water boiling from 212 at atmospheric pressure to approx. 250F when contained to 15 psi containment, radiator. Also agree you need to get it repaired soonest, you really don't know where it is.
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Old 05-20-2014, 11:35 PM   #18
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Unless your moving it to get it to a safe spot to park it, You shouldn't drive it. Mechanics who say its ok to use the graduated dash gauge, I assume thats on the dash for temperature, that is telling you 230 degrees, is not in your best interest. Can't remember what coolants' boiling point is under pressure, but I do know water boils at 212 degrees, at STP ( stand temperature pressure) Not good.

Well, the boiling point is a function of the pressure...more pressure, higher boiling point. The cooling system is definitely under pressure. I've not let the coolant boil, if that's the concern, but the temp has reached the high 220s. To me, it seems like the logic for the fan likes to come on at initial start, then, if the engine is already hot, the logic tells the fan to continue to run. It just won't start if the trigger temperature is arrived at from the cool side, but it does have a better chance of doing the right thing if the engine is started with an elevated temp already. Then the fan just keeps running (most of the time).

My question is, what temp would be problematic to reach, say, 4-6 times in the next 3 weeks? If 228F is ok, I'll make sure I stop by then. That temp usually triggers the fan to run upon restart.

The "gauge" I'm using is the engine diagnostic readout on the LCD on the dash. Probably not perfect, but better than a dash needle.
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Old 05-20-2014, 11:43 PM   #19
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Well, the boiling point is a function of the pressure...more pressure, higher boiling point. The cooling system is definitely under pressure. I've not let the coolant boil, if that's the concern, but the temp has reached the high 220s. To me, it seems like the logic for the fan likes to come on at initial start, then, if the engine is already hot, the logic tells the fan to continue to run. It just won't start if the trigger temperature is arrived at from the cool side, but it does have a better chance of doing the right thing if the engine is started with an elevated temp already. Then the fan just keeps running (most of the time).

My question is, what temp would be problematic to reach, say, 4-6 times in the next 3 weeks? If 228F is ok, I'll make sure I stop by then. That temp usually triggers the fan to run upon restart.

The "gauge" I'm using is the engine diagnostic readout on the LCD on the dash. Probably not perfect, but better than a dash needle.
That's what I said, the cap is probably rated to 15 psi which is 249.7, I guessed 250F. That's where the mechanics of the system says enough! Around 250 degrees and will open the relief valve and steam out. 230 is about 10% below this rating and is safe, don't push it however. I'm thinkin the clutch is there to cut out the fan when you have enough road speed for draft cooling. Not a diesel engine designer though. Check the cap rating and you are good to go.
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Old 05-20-2014, 11:45 PM   #20
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I understand the water pump is operable, but you indicated you come off the highway and shut it down, no pump. I agree with your first post, the electronics of the fan are goofy, but that's another reason to believe the temp is off. BTW I don't have steam tables with me. The table will indicate if you contain water in a pressure cooker or boiler, the temp needed to boil rises with pressure. IE a 15 psi radiator cap will raise the temp of water boiling from 212 at atmospheric pressure to approx. 250F when contained to 15 psi containment, radiator. Also agree you need to get it repaired soonest, you really don't know where it is.

Here's a table I found...you're right about 15 psi and 250F

http://www.heat-transfer-fluid.com/p...ling-point.pdf

I'd be crazy to go that high, but I wouldn't boil over with a 15 pound cap if I did. I just want to ensure that the engine can take 228F when I try to trigger the fan, even if the coolant is still liquid. The mechanic seems to think so, but it's my rig.

And you're also correct, I need to get this fixed.
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