Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-06-2012, 02:31 PM   #1
Graduate Member
 
RoadTrip's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Columbia, MO
Posts: 508
Re-tightening the lugnuts as regular maintenence?

First time caller - long time listener.

So we're brand new (since August) RVers. We've never used one until we bought one, and I'm not the most mechanical guy in the world. That said...here's the question:

Am I supposed to retighten/retorque the lugnuts on a Class C (Sunseeker 2860)?

My mechanic BIL mentioned that his friends who own an RV said the lugs are designed to loosen over time, and he thinks once per year I need to retighten, but that was the end of his knowledge/hearsay.

So I ask the experts...am I?

I can go buy one of those fancy torque pound measuring wrenches and all that - I'm not afraid of the work. And I've searched the forum - but there doesn't seem to be a clear newbie directive of "this is what you do".

Thanks all - appreciate the help (and any other tips on general upkeep/maintenence - except for winterizing, we keep ours in the garage and plan to use it year around with a heated hose)
__________________

__________________
--2009 Sunseeker 2860DS (Class C)
- one Hotwife, and two boys under 2(with one on the way!)
2013 - 53 days
2012 - 26 days

RoadTrip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2012, 02:47 PM   #2
Moderator Emeritus
 
Dave_Monica's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 4,329
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoadTrip View Post
My mechanic BIL mentioned that his friends who own an RV said the lugs are designed to loosen over time, and he thinks once per year I need to retighten, but that was the end of his knowledge/hearsay.
I've never heard of that before...isn't any different than the vehicle that you drive every day.

It's recommended to check the lugnut torque on aluminum wheel a couple of timesin the first few hundred miles to ensure that they haven't loosened. No harm in checking the torque with a proper torque wrench periodically...don't loosen and retighten, just check.

Dave
__________________

__________________


Nights camped in 2013 - 55, 2014 - 105, 2015 - 63
Dave_Monica is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2012, 02:48 PM   #3
Too old to be too smart
 
SpringerPop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: La La Land
Posts: 409
"Designed to loosen"? No.

However, they can, and sometimes do, loosen a bit over time.

If I were you, I would buy a "cheaper" torque wrench. You need one with a one-half-inch drive, and the appropriate socket that will fit your lug nuts.

Though this is not meant as an endorsement, Harbor Freight runs coupon specials all the time, and you should be able to get one there to suit your needs nicely.

The important thing isn't the accuracy (though even the cheap ones will be relatively close), but the "even-ness" with which all the nuts are tightened around the hub.

Your torque specs aren't on the tips of my fingers, but it's encyclopedic information anyway, so......

Pop
__________________
2005 Terry 250RKS, perfect for the two of us and the pups.
It recently replaced our Flagstaff 21FB (which we still have)

2000 F-350 7.3L CC/LB 4WD Lariat 3.73's
SpringerPop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2012, 02:57 PM   #4
Graduate Member
 
RoadTrip's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Columbia, MO
Posts: 508
whew! thanks guys - that takes a load off my mind.

Since we bought it with 45,000 miles, I'm not worried about the first 100 mile thing.

And excellent point SpringerPop - makes sense to check that they're all even on the tightening.

Thanks again - you guys are the best
__________________
--2009 Sunseeker 2860DS (Class C)
- one Hotwife, and two boys under 2(with one on the way!)
2013 - 53 days
2012 - 26 days

RoadTrip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2012, 09:45 PM   #5
Member
 
kevinC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 44
Designed to loosen? I've never heard of such a thing. That guy needs a refresher on mechanics 101.
__________________

2006 T23FBL Wildwood Lite
2009 Ford E-350 Super Duty 5.4L 3.73
kevinC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2012, 10:06 PM   #6
Oklahoma Proud
 
MillerTime's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: central OK
Posts: 2,775
Aluminum wheels are more common to loosen and overlly tighten do to the aluminum expanding and contracting with heat and cold at a different rate than steel. Also on steel, many wheels will have a raised area that the lugs contact, so when tightened they will deflect in slightly and retain pressure- kind of like lock washers do. Heavy steel wheels don't have those dimpled areas but steel on steel seems to not be as problamatic.

Ps. Anti-siese works great on threads to ease removal in the future
__________________
MillerTime is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2012, 10:13 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Waynesville
Posts: 12,036
Not very many Class C units come with Alum.rims. The Mfg. of the chass.will dictate the torque specifications. Youroo!!
__________________
youroo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2012, 10:19 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Waynesville
Posts: 12,036
Lug nuts & studs are a DRY fit,never use Anti-sieze! Youroo!!
__________________
youroo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2012, 10:31 PM   #9
Member
 
kevinC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 44
As a mechanical engineer I will say that there is a huge difference with the phrase "designed to loosen" and "can loosen by design", which is mentioned on aluminum and certain steel rims. The first is by purpose and the later is a component of design. Trailer wheels see a tremendous side loading especially when backing in and can cause lugs to loosen from flexing. Even your alloy rims on your vehicle should be checked periodically as the lugs can loosen if you are an aggressive driver.
__________________

2006 T23FBL Wildwood Lite
2009 Ford E-350 Super Duty 5.4L 3.73
kevinC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2012, 10:34 PM   #10
Oklahoma Proud
 
MillerTime's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: central OK
Posts: 2,775
Quote:
Originally Posted by youroo
Lug nuts & studs are a DRY fit,never use Anti-sieze! Youroo!!
You might ask at a tire shop or dealership. Specs may be dry for tork. I have always used on studs at our dealership and most other guys do too, prevents the threads frim gauling and the next time I work on that vehicle I wont have to worry about twisting studs off.

All of my big rigs, vehicles, trailers, farm equipment and the hundreds I
of customer vehicles i work on every year get anti-sieze (on the studs) with no comebacks, and no plan to stop using it.
__________________

__________________
MillerTime is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
lugnuts, torque

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:56 PM.