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Old 08-06-2015, 05:04 PM   #31
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So back to the OP's question instead of your debate.
Who has had a tire failure?
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Old 08-06-2015, 05:29 PM   #32
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Goodyear marathon

It seems like quite a few Goodyear marathons about 1-2 years old are blowing. We blew two on the way to Elkhart. Stopped after 2 and bought new set of carlisles. All discount tire had in stock We were correctly inflated and not overloaded
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Old 08-06-2015, 05:54 PM   #33
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Like some others have posted here, I've never had a blow-out. However, I've been lucky... or maybe just vigilant. I did my usual pre-trip inspection and found one of my OEM tires with tread separation at about 8K miles, and replaced it with a Maxxis. I went to Phoenix and back (2K miles) and inspected the OEMs during and after the trip. I decided to replace the other 3 OEMs before going out again. The tire dealer showed me that 2 more of the OEMs were having tread separation problems. We're going to have to face the fact that there are a lot of junk ST tires coming into this country, and the RV builders are getting them dirt cheap. They are in business to make money, as any good business should be. But until some hot-shot reporter starts digging like happened in the Ford/Firestone thing, we're going to have to either cross our fingers, or pay the extra bucks to change new tires... and even then... cross our fingers...
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Old 08-06-2015, 05:56 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mud yapster View Post
Who has had a tire failure?
I have... Multiple...

I've forgotten the name of the OEMs that FR put under my HW276, but the Driver-side showed "terminal" sidewall damage "Rock Bruising" before 1000 mi. (Caught it just before a probable Blowout.)
The replacement Carlisle on the same side developed similar issue within 500-1000mi (again caught just before a probable Blowout - suspect a Gravel section of an AZ State Highway).
This Spring I had an actual Blowout, Curb-side tire this time, running a Carlisle that had been purchased the previous Fall through Big-O. The Blowout took out some of the Wheelwell and a Propane Line and Wiring. I limped in on a Spare (still the OEM brand but now sporting a serious Sidewall Separation) to a Big-O (wouldn't you know just 1 exit of the I-10 past my Blowout), where they replaced that bulged Spare with another Carlisle based on the Road Hazard Warranty.

I've found that I have Very Few Choices in Tires. RF designed the HW276 to within a few Lbs of the Dexter Torsion Axle Rating and chose to design the Wheelwells very tight in order to save on Ride Height and Interior Space. And they placed much more of the Weight over the Driver-side Tire (Slide + John + deepest portion of the Fresh Water Tank). I already have the highest rated 14in STs, and no one makes higher load-rated LTs in 14, and even with a 2in Dexter Lift would probably have Rubbing at the back of the Wheelwell if I tried to move up to 15s.
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Old 08-06-2015, 08:06 PM   #35
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Airdale, I agree with part of your comments, but I am convinced that there is a serious problem with the design and quality of RV products as compared with previous years. I am a compulsive maintenance freak especially when it comes to my TT tires. I have owned four different units over the years and did not have any problems until the last two TTs which cover the past 7 years or so. Brand new TTs that have undersized axles and tires are not uncommon and the tires themselves simply do not wear and hold up even with regular checks and maintenance. I simply do not understand why the manufacturers do not address these problems because they are real as validated by the many horror stories posted here and on other forums. When I talk to fellow campers these days it seems the conversation always gets around to problems we are having with quality control in manufacturing these RVs and war stories about tires blowing and tearing the sides out of the campers. Many of these folks are experienced, knowledgable and careful in taking care of their RVs. There is a serious problem in the industry, period.
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Old 08-06-2015, 09:09 PM   #36
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I’m trying to stay within the guide lines the OP has set in post #1.

The catastrophic failures we see with trailer tires are mostly tread separations in combination with a complete carcass failure. Damage to exterior materials in and around the RV trailer wheel wells are often extensive.

The following NHTSA quote is a little out of context but it adds to a trailer owners dilemma.

“The GVWR must not be exceeded by overloading the vehicle. There is little the government can do to assist a consumer who has purchased a vehicle that has insufficient cargo capacity for its intended use.”

It’s a “buyer beware” market and they often take full advantage of it.

In another regulation the trailer manufacturer MUST publish a pin/hitch weight. The trailer manufacturer is allowed to set the GAWR for each axle. A brochure may say your trailer has 5800# axles but in fact you will only be allowed to use 5080# of that amount if the trailer manufacturer has set them at 5080# and put that figure on the trailer’s certification label. Now the trailer manufacturer must use the published pin weight with the total GAWR so that they will equal or exceed the trailer’s GVWR. What is in between is cargo and it’s also on a mandated placard inside of the trailer. The trailer manufacturer must fit tires to each axle with a load capacity equal to or greater than the axle’s GAWR. One of the standard 15” trailer tires has a load capacity of 2540# at it’s maximum inflation pressure. According to all existing regulations those tires are a legal fit for the 5080# certified GAWRs above. There is zero load capacity reserves with a fully loaded axle. How long will they last? Will the owner figure out what has happened after they fail? What is the solution? It’s very doubtful that the trailer manufacturer will recommend anything other than what they put on there because according to the regulations their fitments were within the regulations and suitable.
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Old 08-07-2015, 02:21 PM   #37
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This past Saturday I was just starting a 3 month trip to the east coast. Had only gone 250 miles when one Goodyear Marathon ST235/80R16 blew, causing quite a bit of damage to the passenger side: end of trip. Turned around to come home and had gone 120 miles when the second tire on the passenger side blew. Had to wait in the heat of the Nevada desert for 4 1/2 hours for a service technician to show up and replace that tire (no second spare tire). Tires were properly inflated and was only going 60 MPH. Original tires on rig with less than 2500 miles on them. Just filed a complaint with safecar.gov website.
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Old 08-07-2015, 03:23 PM   #38
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Good info jackdn0610
At least now we have someone to file these reports with (safe car.gov). I personally did not know of this website, so now my question from a previous post has been answered, "what do we do?" But that still doesn't change the fact that every manufacturer is subject to having their product fail. I tend to agree with some of the other forum members who believe a lot of these issues are our own faults. Maybe we aren't doing quite as good a job of managing our tires as we think we are,ME included.
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Old 10-08-2015, 03:25 PM   #39
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I'm a little late to the party, but will add my experience to the list.
I've got a 2015 Rockwood 2604WS with less than 1000 miles on it.
Factory tires are Constancy LY188 205/75R14 LRC.
We had an unexplained tire failure somewhere between Gunnison, CO and Buena Vista, CO. Most likely this occurred on Monarch Pass.
Tire pressure was checked that morning, and tires visually inspected at a lunch stop before the failure.
Speeds were not excessive...you really can't speed on Monarch Pass.

Actions I took:
-filed complaint with NHTSA
-complained to Forest River
-bought a TPMS
-bought an infrared thermometer
-bought a set of Kumho 857 205/75R14 LRD tires

One thing I noticed is that the load rating of the factory tires has just barely the capacity to support my trailer when it's standing still. I revisited college Physics 101 and some civil engineering information on force vectors on curves. If my math is right, each time I take a curve at the posted advisory speed (yellow speed limit sign), I overstress my outside tires by about 350lbs each. The problem is that weight shifts to an outside wheel on curves. If tires are already marginal quality, and if they're loaded to the max by the manufacturer, this might explain some failures.
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Old 10-08-2015, 05:32 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gyrogearloose View Post
I'm a little late to the party, but will add my experience to the list.
I've got a 2015 Rockwood 2604WS with less than 1000 miles on it.
Factory tires are Constancy LY188 205/75R14 LRC.
We had an unexplained tire failure somewhere between Gunnison, CO and Buena Vista, CO. Most likely this occurred on Monarch Pass.
Tire pressure was checked that morning, and tires visually inspected at a lunch stop before the failure.
Speeds were not excessive...you really can't speed on Monarch Pass.

Actions I took:
-filed complaint with NHTSA
-complained to Forest River
-bought a TPMS
-bought an infrared thermometer
-bought a set of Kumho 857 205/75R14 LRD tires

One thing I noticed is that the load rating of the factory tires has just barely the capacity to support my trailer when it's standing still. I revisited college Physics 101 and some civil engineering information on force vectors on curves. If my math is right, each time I take a curve at the posted advisory speed (yellow speed limit sign), I overstress my outside tires by about 350lbs each. The problem is that weight shifts to an outside wheel on curves. If tires are already marginal quality, and if they're loaded to the max by the manufacturer, this might explain some failures.
That's really interesting. Esp if you took into account tongue weight.
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