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Old 03-20-2012, 10:09 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by jriddering View Post
What are the second 2 digits mean?
I believe it is the "Traction Code"
AA being the highest traction code.

Since ST tires are designed for almost no "traction," so HH would be reasonable. Traction in an ST tire is counter productive. High traction in a trailer equals high rolling resistance and low tire life.
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Old 03-20-2012, 10:11 AM   #12
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My Cedar Creek came from the factory with LT235 85R16 tires. They are now 6+ years old, so this spring they are going away. My replacement tire of choice is Hankook DrnaPro AS LT235 85R16. To the OP. Get a LT235 85R16 and go camping. Michelin XPS Rib is a trailer service rated tire according to Michelin. Also BF Goodrich Commercial TA is a bit lower cost alternative. Someone suggested GoodJunk G614's. Problem is you probably do not have enough wheel to handle that tire. If you really want to do away with tire failures, change everything to 17.5 inch trailer tires and wheels. They come rated at over 4K per tire and should provide years of reliable service.
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Old 03-20-2012, 11:02 AM   #13
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Thanks, Lou, for the info on tires. My max tire pressure is 65 lbs. I cannot imagine having to put in 100 psi in a trailer tire. It must be the difference in trailer weight. Being I bought the 290 RLT last August, I hope the tires work ok.
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Old 03-20-2012, 01:21 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by herk7769 View Post
Was on the phone with a tire safety guy last week and he had an unusual twist in the ST vs LT debate.

LT tire tread is designed to provide optimum traction under power and turning performance in all weather conditions. As such, the tread design provides for high friction in side loading to provide "grip" while turning. It also has an aggressive tread for high friction when used as a drive tire. It also has channels for water to squirt out the sides to keep the drive and steering wheels from hydroplaning. These channels also provide high friction when the tire is twisted in hard turns.

ST tires have a unique tread design. There are only ribs and channels that follow the rotation of the tire. There are no (or few) side to side grooves and the tread itself is very "non-aggressive" to provide a minimum rolling friction for better tire life and fuel economy.

In the past, the higher tire loading in high end campers was not being served by the tire industry so to provide the load carrying capacity required they put LT tires on at the factory. Today, there are more choices available and for a given load factor better performance will come from an ST tire.

Under similar driving conditions, the ST tire will provide better gas mileage and longer tire life. During sharp turns the ST tire will crab sideways much more easily than an LT tire. This will reduce uneven wear and "scrubbing" of the tread.

ST tires also have a much higher emulsion content in the rubber since most ST tires don't get a lot of use. LT tires are run at highways speeds more often and the emulsion can lubricate the rubber more easily when the tires get hot at highway speeds. The higher content in the ST tire rubber prevents/delays dry rot in tires that don't get much use.

Paraphrased from a 2 hour conversation with
Walter C. Cannon
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RV Safety & Education Foundation

Don't shoot the messenger...
Excellent post Lou, I have ST tires now and when it is time for replacements I see (and this confirms) no reason to switch. Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by herk7769 View Post
I believe it is the "Traction Code"
AA being the highest traction code.

Since ST tires are designed for almost no "traction," so HH would be resonable. Traction in an ST tire is counter productive. High traction in a trailer equals high rolling resistance and low tire life.
Although it may appear counter intuitive to (re)include the tire size in the DOT marking (after all it is in much bigger print around the tire) that's exactly what the 3rd and 4th digits are, the tire size. An HH tire would be P225/75R15. Here is a link for the other DOT tire size codes, Tire Size
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Old 03-20-2012, 03:02 PM   #15
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Remember, ST tires have a speed limit of 65MPH. St tires have a long history of catastrophic failures. Often causing thousands of dollars in damage to the trailer. Why anyone in their right mind would put a known inferior product back on their trailer is beyond me? Over the years many many trailers have come equipped with LT tires. They have proved reliable and trouble free. The bla bla about economy is kind of questionable in my mind. If it were true, then people should be running ST tires on their trucks as well shouldn't they? This would save thousand of gallons of gasoline a year using that logic. Tires like the Michelin XPS RIB have a straight highway tread pattern that is very similar to the ST tire tread. But with a much stiffer sidewall. They are Trailer Service rated and an excellent replacement for the ST235 85R16 found on many larger trailers. As always it is the buyers choice as to what they consider their time and money is worth in regards to the safety of their family if one of the ST bombs blows out at 70MPH on the freeway causing an accident or major damage to their trailer. Personally I would not even consider using an ST tire on my trailer.
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Old 03-20-2012, 04:27 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by frankm View Post
Although it may appear counter intuitive to (re)include the tire size in the DOT marking (after all it is in much bigger print around the tire) that's exactly what the 3rd and 4th digits are, the tire size. An HH tire would be P225/75R15. Here is a link for the other DOT tire size codes, Tire Size
Thanks Frank, The HH business was a total guess on my part (I hope I conveyed that it was in my post) based on the letter codes.

I had never seen the last two digits mentioned before.
I again learned something new on this forum to add to my "Bag of Tricks".
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Old 03-20-2012, 04:32 PM   #17
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The bla bla about economy is kind of questionable in my mind. If it were true, then people should be running ST tires on their trucks as well shouldn't they?
Don, I think you missed the point of the post. A trailer does not need traction or turning performance. A car/truck does. Aggressive tread is desirable on a tow vehicle but is counter productive on a trailer.

PM me if you want Walter's phone number at the Safety Center.
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Old 03-20-2012, 04:45 PM   #18
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Guess you have never towed anything in a rain storm? Personally I am not interested as much in straight line performance as I am in longevity and the ability to handle rain soaked roads. A good quality AS truck tire will out perform a ST tire any day even on a trailer.
While this debate will not end soon I am still a firm believer in replacing what ever tire is under a persons trailer with something of far superior quality. To me that is an LT tire. Some people still think they have to have ST tires under their heavy trailers, and that is all well and good. But just don't come back here crying the blues about all the damage that the blowout did to your trailer. Heck, if I was still working my next upgrade would be 7K axles and 17.5 inch tire and wheel package. That would all but eliminate ever having tire issues in the future. Barring of course a nail puncture. IMHO the sole reason ST tires are being installed under larger trailers is $$$. The bottom line. Manufacturers are probably buying the Chinese ST tire for roughly 40 dollars each. So about $160 for tires, vs about $600 for a quality LT tire under each unit that rolls off the assembly line.
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Old 03-20-2012, 04:48 PM   #19
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Don't remember what kind of tires my 2011 Flagstaff 5th wheel has on it, but if I remember correctly, they said "made in China" on them. Wayne
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Old 03-20-2012, 05:31 PM   #20
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Remember, ST tires have a speed limit of 65MPH.
Shouldn't be towing over 65 mph anyway . . .
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